Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Closing the Isotope Hydrology at Summit: Measurements of Source Regions, Precipitation and Post-deposition Processes (Award# 1023574)

PI: Abdalati, Waleed (waleed.abdalati@colorado.edu)
Phone: 0(301) 614.5706 
Institute/Department: National Aeronautical and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Geochemistry | Meteorology and Climate\Paleoclimatology |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The stable isotopic records from the Greenland Ice Sheet are the gold standard for understanding climate variations in the Arctic on decadal to millennial scales. While the basic tenets that underlie interpretation of isotopic information appear robust in a mean sense, meteorological and glaciological processes can confound simple interpretations. Processes of concern are variations in moisture sources, cloud processes, surface ablation, blowing snow and vapor diffusion in the firn. The project objectives are to resolve fundamental uncertainties in the controls on the isotopic composition of the ice sheet through a 3-year measurement campaign at Summit, Eureka and Reykjavik. The project will use measurements and modeling to evaluate 1) the degree to which oxygen isotopic composition and deuterium excess of snow capture variations in moisture sources versus cloud microphysical conditions, and 2) the degree to which blowing snow and vapor diffusion within the firn confound accurate interpretation of variability in the isotopic record. Continuous measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapor and daily measurements of the isotopic composition of freshly-fallen and blowing snow will be made at Summit, Eureka and Reykjavik. These will be combined with measurements of the amount, size distribution, and approximate habit of falling and blowing snow, turbulence measurements to evaluate snow lofting, surface latent heat flux (ablation and frost) and energy balance, and remote sensing of polar clouds and atmospheric structure. High-resolution firn cores will be drilled to reconcile the detailed isotopic measurements and modeling with glaciological records. The new isotope measurements will jump start an emerging international pan-Arctic cooperative network of isotope measurements, which complements Arctic observations under existing Arctic Observing Network activities. The advanced measurements at Summit enhance the site as a comprehensive observatory for monitoring and understanding Arctic change.

Logistics Summary:
This project involves an installation of instrumentation at Summit Station, Greenland, to measure processes that influence the isotopic composition of snow on the Greenland ice sheet. While the team will also work at Eureka and Reykjavik, measurements at Summit Station are the focal point of the study, and this support plan only details the work at Summit Station. The experiments will require a suite of meteorological and turbulence instruments, precipitation and cloud particle spectrometers, and a water vapor isotopic composition analyzer. The Summit Station work also includes snow collection and drilling a series of shallow ice cores (15-20m) to study firn properties. Researchers will work at Summit Station for four years, summer 2011 through summer 2014. During each season, a team of three to four will travel via the Air National Guard logistics chain to Summit Station, and spend two to four weeks working at the site. In the first year, instruments were installed on the existing 50-meter tower, with further instrumentation in an adjacent below-surface workspace. During the following two years the instruments were maintained by the Summit Station science technicians, with annual maintenance/upgrade visits from the researchers. In the final year the team will remove all instrumentation. In addition to working with the instrument suite as described above, each year the research team will conduct additional snow measurements and drill 3-5 shallow (15-20 meter) ice cores at locations around, and up to 5km away from, Summit Station. Processing of the core samples, and snow samples collected during storm events, will occur on-site prior to shipment to the home institution (samples will be retrograded as melt, not frozen). On-station science technicians will collect the snow samples and monitor the experiment when research personnel are off-station. CPS will ship processed samples as cargo requirements allow.

CPS will provide ANG support coordination for a team of three people and their cargo, accommodations and lodging in Kangerlussuaq, user days and access to Summit infrastructure and project workspace, procurement and installation and maintenance of a 10’x10’ below-surface structure, use of existing 50-meter tower, science technician support, and pre-deployment tower climb training. IDDO will provide drilling equipment. The PI will arrange for all other support—including that from Environment Canada and CANDAC at Eureka, and from University of Iceland in Reykjavik—and pay for it through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island07 / 07 / 2011 07 / 14 / 20112
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 30 / 2011 06 / 15 / 20114
2011Greenland - Summit05 / 03 / 2011 06 / 13 / 20114
2012Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island07 / 07 / 2012 07 / 14 / 20121
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 14 / 2012 06 / 28 / 20124
2012Greenland - Summit05 / 16 / 2012 06 / 26 / 20124
2013Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island07 / 24 / 2013 07 / 31 / 20131
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 25 / 2013 07 / 19 / 20133
2013Greenland - Summit06 / 26 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20133
2014Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island07 / 07 / 2014 07 / 14 / 20141
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 27 / 2014 07 / 18 / 20143
2014Greenland - Summit06 / 28 / 2014 07 / 17 / 20143
 


Project Title: Collaborative research: Spatial and temporal variability of surface albedo and light absorbing chemical species in Greenland (Award# 1203889)

PI: Bergin, Michael H (mhb34@duke.edu)
Phone: 0(919) 660.5401  
Institute/Department: Duke University, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Blog: https://coldregionscience.wordpress.com/

Science Summary:
The collaborative team will take advantage of the currently funded Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) traveling between Thule and Summit Greenland to access a spatially diverse area of the GIS in order to better understand albedo variability and the snow properties that influence albedo. The GrIT route offers a unique opportunity to study a wide range of snow accumulation zones (i.e. the ablation zone, soaked snow zone, the percolation zone and the dry snow zone) across Greenland, which are expected to have a broad range of albedo values as well as significant variability in snow physical properties and concentrations of light absorbing compounds (i.e. dust, elemental carbon, and brown carbon). The project's field component will take place over two seasons during the spring of 2013 and 2014. The approach will include stopping along the traverse to collect coincident daily measurements of snow spectral albedo, snow physical properties (i.e. specific surface area, density), surface snow light absorption properties (i.e. wavelength dependent absorption of water soluble compounds and particulates), and the concentrations of trace elements, organic, and elemental carbon. Additionally, the temporal evolution of spectral albedo will be monitored continuously during the sunlit months using autonomous stations deployed along the traverse route to track seasonal variations of snow albedo and to help attribute these variations to the physical and chemical composition of the snow. The results of this project will yield a unique data set characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of surface albedo as well as the physical and chemical properties of Greenland snow, which are broadly useful to both modeling, ice mass balance, and remote sensing communities. Conference presentations, rapid publication of results, and most importantly close collaboration with modelers, (i.e. through work with the CESM PCWG) will ensure that this knowledge used to improve process parameterizations in predictive global climate models. The team will also build on international collaborations begun in the Dartmouth IGERT program, including a week-long ambassadorship to Nuuk by co-PI Polashenski including lectures at the college and Katuuaq cultural center. Graduate, undergraduate, and high school student training will also be included in the project.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaborative effort between Courville (1204145, CRREL, lead), Dibb (1203876, UNH), Bergin (1203889, Duke) and Schauer (1204059, WISC) will study the chemical, physical and reflective properties of near-surface snow in northern Greenland in order to better understand the large-scale spatial variability of these properties. Field work will take place in 2013 and 2014. [NOTE *Bergin changed institutions from GA Tech to Duke at which time a new grant was given to Bergin (1546002). The 2013-2014 work is carried under grant 1203889 and any work will be concluded in 2015 under 1546002. The lead on the collaboration is still Courville, 1204145 for this collaboration.] Logistic details under 1204145.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Thule0
2014Other - GrIT0
 


Project Title: Ultraviolet Radiation in the Arctic: 2012-2015 (Award# 1203250)

PI: Bernhard, Germar Hermann (bernhard@biospherical.com)
Phone: 0(619) 686.1888 
Institute/Department: Biospherical Instruments, Inc.,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Radiation | Meteorology and Climate\Surface UV Radiation |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://uv.biospherical.com
Data: http://www.ndsc.ncep.noaa.gov/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: http://www.woudc.org
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Biospherical Instruments Inc (BSI) has operated NSF’s Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitoring Network (UVSIMN) between 1988 and 2008. The network included three locations in Antarctica, two in the Arctic (Barrow, Alaska, and Summit, Greenland) and two mid-latitude sites. In 2009, the instruments at Barrow and Summit have been integrated into NSF’s Arctic Observing Network as part of the AON projects “Ultraviolet Radiation in the Arctic” and, since 2012, “Ultraviolet Radiation in the Arctic: 2012-2015.” The award is jointly overseen by Prof. John E. Frederick of the University of Chicago and Dr. Germar Bernhard of BSI and will end on 31-August 2015. To date, the network has produced one of the longest Climate Data Records (CDR) of UV radiation in existence. Measurements at Barrow span the 21-year period of 1991-2012. Measurements at Summit started in 2004 and are ideally suited to probe the free troposphere and study the effects of long-range transport of pollutants and aerosols on UV radiation. Data can also be used for validation of satellite observations, verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere, advancement of climate models, and addressing the SEARCH question such as whether the Arctic is moving to a new state. Data have been used by hundreds of researchers investigating the effects of stratospheric ozone depletion and other climatic factors on UV radiation at the Earth’s surface and subsequent consequences on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and humans. Several researchers from other AON projects have used data. Recently, data were used to interpret radiosonde and LIDAR observations at Summit as part of the AON project “High Resolution, Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Microphysics at Summit, Greenland with Polarized Raman Lidar” (NSF Award 1303864) and to calibrate down-welling irradiance measurements at Summit in support of the AON project “Direct radiative forcing over central Greenland - assessment of the coupled effect of light absorbing aerosols and snow albedo variability” (NSF Award 1023227) [Wright et al., 2014]. Spectral UV data from Barrow have recently been used to interpret a massive phytoplankton bloom observed in the Chukchi Sea under first-year sea ice in 2011 [Palmer et al., 2014].

Logistics Summary:
This grant supports continued UV-visible solar irradiance observing experiments. BSI will operate several radiometers at Barrow, Alaska, and Summit, Greenland. This project is a continuation of the NSF's Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance monitoring Network (UVSIMN) and NSF grants 0907819 and 0856268. For information regarding the project's prior logistics, see records for 0907819 (2009 only), 0856268, and UVSIMN. At Summit, the instrument is primarily maintained by on-site science technicians, with occasional visits by the research team for maintenance, or tear down/set-up when the structure where the experiment is housed must be relocated. During 2013 the team will make two deployments. In June the team will visit Summit to dismantle the instrument for storage while the Green House structure is relocated. The PI will return to Summit in July to reinstall the instrument in the Green House at the new location. At Barrow, on-site technicians in the employ of Arctic Administrators LLC maintain the instruments.

At Summit Station, CPS will provide access to the Summit infrastructure, accommodations and meals in Kangerlussuaq, user days at Summit, and science technician services. The PI will not send a research team to Barrow using local CPS support in 2013 and 2014, though a visit may be arranged using grant funds. All other logistics will be coordinated by the researchers through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 25 / 2013 07 / 19 / 20133
2013Greenland - Summit06 / 26 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20133
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 17 / 2015 07 / 27 / 20151
2015Greenland - Summit07 / 18 / 2015 07 / 25 / 20151
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2016Greenland - Summit0
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2017Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Investigating the potential of carbon-14 in polar firn and ice as a tracer of past cosmic ray flux and an absolute dating tool (Award# 1204084)

PI: Brook, Edward J (brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu)
Phone: 0(541) 737.8197 
Institute/Department: Oregon State University, Department of Geosciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate | Space Physics |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This grant will investigate the potential of carbon-14 in ice cores as an absolute dating tool, as a tracer of the past cosmic ray flux and as a recorder of the past fossil fraction of the global methane budget. Cosmic ray particles produce carbon-14 from oxygen-16 directly within near-surface glacial ice and firn. This in-situ produced carbon-14 quickly reacts to form 14C-containing carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane in the ice matrix. Some or all of the resulting 14C-bearing gases may be lost from the firn to the atmosphere. This research will provide a thorough characterization of in-situ cosmogenic 14C in glacial firn and shallow ice in the Summit region of Greenland. It will examine the retention of cosmogenic 14C in ice grains at all depth levels in the firn column, the partitioning of 14C between carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane, as well as the production rates and accumulation of cosmogenic 14C in shallow ice below firn close-off. A thorough understanding of cosmogenic C-14 in firn and shallow ice will likely enable the use of C-14 in ice for one or more of the following applications:
 1) If a relatively large amount of cosmogenic 14C is present in ice below the depth at which air bubbles become sealed off, it will be useful as a tracer for past cosmic ray flux. The investigators believe that this is the likely case for 14C-carbon monoxide. 2) If the amount of retained in-situ-produced 14C-carbon dioxide is relatively small compared to 14C-carbon dioxide from trapped air, the study will demonstrate the validity of using 14C-carbon dioxide for absolute dating of ice cores; this has long been a target of ice core studies. 3) If the amount of retained in-situ-produced 14C-methane is relatively small compared to 14C-methane from trapped air, the study will demonstrate the validity of using 14C-methane in glacial ice for determinations of the fossil fraction of the past methane budget, including releases from methane clathrates. This project will establish a new international collaboration between University of Rochester (UR) and University of Bern and result in novel laboratory and field analytical systems. The data from the study will be made available to the scientific community and the broad public through the ACADIS data service. One graduate student will be trained at UR, and one postdoc and one graduate student will be partially supported at Oregon State University. Three UR undergraduates will be involved in fieldwork and research. The work will support an early career scientist. All of the investigators will continue to participate in public outreach.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Petrenko (1203779, U of Rochester), Severinghaus (1203686, UCSD) and Brook (1204084, OSU) will conduct a 3 year project drilling in the vicinity of Summit Station (~7 km away from the Station proper). Logistic details located under 1203779.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2014Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2015Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2015Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: A pan-Arctic, storm-by-storm isotopic investigation of the influence of Arctic sea ice on precipitation - a crucial link in the coupled climate system (Award# 1023651)

PI: Burkhart, John F (jburkhart@ucmerced.edu)
Phone: 0(209) 658.7142 
Institute/Department: U of California, Merced, School of Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Erica Key (ekey@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Isotope Hydrology |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This project will quantify the relationship between the ice-free area of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas, and evaporation and precipitation in the Arctic. The methodology uses isotopic compositions of storm-by-storm precipitation samples, pan-Arctic meteorological data, satellite sea ice data, and numerical modeling. Precipitation samples will be collected at nine Arctic observatories, and by three high schools in Greenland. Samples will be analyzed for D/H and 18O/16O ratios. The track of a given storm will be reconstructed using reanalysis data and a Lagrangian trajectory algorithm. The project will yield a quantitative understanding of the links among sea ice, and moisture sources and amounts of Arctic precipitation, which comprise an important part of climate dynamics on a wide range of time scales. The results will be pertinent to the interpretation of ice core data, ice age dynamics, abrupt climate change, and global warming. This project also intends to integrate research with education and outreach, which will directly benefit participating arctic communities. The project aims to improve community understanding of how climate change research is done, by providing arctic students with new knowledge and skills, and by inspiring them to pursue advanced studies. At the same time, the PI's will benefit from learning traditional methods of observing, categorizing, and forecasting weather and climate from the indigenous communities participating in the study.

Logistics Summary:
For this research collaboration between 1022032 (Feng, Dartmouth) and 1023651 (Burkhart, UC Merced), the PIs will conduct precipitation sampling at nine Arctic Observatories: Barrow, Atqasuk and Fairbanks, Alaska; Eureka and Cambridge Bay, Canada; Summit Station, Greenland; Cherskii and Tiksi, Russia; and Zeppelin, Norway. In addition, the scientists will work with several communities on the western coast of Greenland to establish precipitation sampling stations there. Refer to 1022032 for logistics details.

See 1022032 for support details.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Alaska - Atqasuk0
2011Alaska - Fairbanks0
2011Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2011Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2011Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2011Greenland - Aasiaat0
2011Greenland - Ikerasaarsuk 0
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2011Greenland - Nuuk0
2011Greenland - Summit0
2011Norway - Zeppelin0
2011Russia - Cherskii0
2011Russia - Tiksi0
2012Alaska - Fairbanks0
2012Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2012Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2012Greenland - Nuuk0
2012Greenland - Qaanaaq0
2012Greenland - Qeqertarsuaq0
2012Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Thule0
2012Norway - Zeppelin0
2012Russia - Cherskii0
2012Russia - Tiksi0
2013Alaska - Fairbanks0
2013Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2013Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Nuuk0
2013Greenland - Qaanaaq0
2013Greenland - Qeqertarsuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2013Norway - Zeppelin0
2013Russia - Cherskii0
2013Russia - Tiksi0
2014Alaska - Fairbanks0
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2014Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2014Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2014Norway - Zeppelin0
2014Russia - Cherskii0
2014Russia - Tiksi0
2016Russia - Tiksi0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Science Coordination Office for Summit Station and the Greenland Traverse (Award# 1042531)

PI: Burkhart, John F (jburkhart@ucmerced.edu)
Phone: 0(209) 658.7142 
Institute/Department: U of California, Merced, School of Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\RSL
Program Manager: Ms. Renee Crain (rcrain@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach | Legacy Projects |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.geosummit.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The Science Coordination Office (SCO) serves the scientific community, NSF/Division of Polar Sciences (PLR), and the arctic logistics contractor by coordinating input and providing an organized advisory mechanism for PLR regarding decisions impacting Summit Station. SCO makes recommendations to CPS about ways to accommodate or mitigate conflicting requests from different science teams, and suggests ways investigators might accomplish science objectives with smaller logistical impacts. SCO advocates on behalf of the community, suggesting science-based priorities for capital investments by PLR at Summit that will maintain and enhance the value of the site for research while striving to keep the station financially sustainable. This renewal grant includes two new SCO members to represent the broader research community and diversify generations of researchers. It also adds functionality to the existing SCO by increasing SCO guidance and oversight to include research projects on the Greenland Inland Traverse and future research sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet that may host investigations similar to work done at Summit Station. This award supports activities that expand communication: significant updates to the current GEOSummit webpage (e.g. a virtual tour, Summit bibliography, and Summit GIS); a new Summit Listserv and town-hall-style meetings at the Fall AGU meeting; increased efforts at informal direct contact; and semi-annual teleconferences involving the scientific community. The SCO role in long-range and annual planning is to focus on the economic and environmental sustainability of the station in parallel with the preservation of core station scientific activities. These objectives are captured in a developing Long-range Plan for Summit Station.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration—Dibb (UNH, 1042410, LEAD), Burkhart (UC Merced, 1042531), and Hawley (Dartmouth, 1042358)—will continue support for the Summit Science Coordination Office (SCO) begun under NSF grant 0455623. The SCO was established to coordinate measurements between investigators and the sharing of facilities and personnel on-site; to provide scientific requirements to NSF, its support contractor and European partners as the facility is developed; and to stimulate sharing of data among science projects. Logistics details under 1042410.

Support details under 1042410.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: NOAA Summit Clean Air Program (Award# NOAASummit)

PI: Butler, James H (James.H.Butler@noaa.gov)
Phone: 0(303) 497.6898 
Institute/Department: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, Global Monitoring Division 
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\DOC\NOAA
Program Manager: Dr. Jennifer Mercer (jmercer@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Institute: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aero/
Institute: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/
Institute: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/hats/
Institute: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/
Institute: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ozwv/
Media: http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2005/s2393.htm

Science Summary:
Researchers at NOAA’s Earth System Research Lab (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) conduct continuous measurements of atmospheric composition at Summit Station to better understand changes occurring in the Arctic and Earth system. Continuous measurements include: 1. Halocarbon and other Atmospheric Trace Gases (HATS) Flasks: weekly to biweekly air sampling collection to measure trace gases that are important components of global halocarbon chemistry. These measurements have been ongoing since 2004. 2. Carbon Cycle Greenhouse Gas (CCGG) Flasks: weekly air sampling experiment to analyze levels of trace gases that are part of the global carbon cycle. These measurements were taken during winter of 1997-1998, 2000-2001, 2001-2002, and have been on-going since the 2003-2004 winter period. 3. In-situ Aerosol Sampling Suite: continual measurements of aerosol optical properties to determine aerosol radiative effects. These measurements were initiated in 2003 with an updated suite of instruments in 2009. 4. Surface ozone measurements: continual tropospheric air sampling efforts for ozone levels. These measurements were taken from 2000 to 2002, and from 2003 on. 5. Balloon-borne ozonesondes: measurements of year-round ozone atmospheric profiles. These measurements were first conducted during the late-winter of 2005. 6. In-situ Monitoring with the Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (CATS): a three-channel gas chromatograph performs hourly measurements of ozone depleting gases identified in the Montreal Protocol and amendments including nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, chloroform, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride. These measurements began in 2007. 7. Surface Meteorology: continuous measurements of surface meteorological properties to support both science and flight operations. These measurements have been continuous since summer 2005. 8. Surface Solar Radiation: continuous measurements of broadband solar and thermal radiation. These measurements began in 2013 with additional instruments added in 2016.

Logistics Summary:
For this NOAA program, on-site science technicians maintain a suite of year-round measurements on behalf of NOAA researchers. These measurements began in the mid 1990s and are ongoing (part of GEOSummit since 2003). NOAA representatives visit Summit Station annually to install / maintain instruments, train science technicians, and conduct measurements. Starting in 2005, NOAA began staffing science technician rotations as Summit Station during the winter phases. Beginning in 2008 NOAA increased staffing to be year-round. Monitoring projects on site include: carbon cycle gas sampling flasks, black carbon measurement, halocarbons and trace species flask sampling, meteorology suite, stratospheric ozonesondes, aerosol measurements, surface ozone measurements, and an in-situ gas chromatograph for greenhouse gas measurements. NOAA will continue to collaborate with Georgia Tech on activities related to the aerosol instrument suite that was previously installed and maintained by the Bergin project (NSF grant #1023227). NOAA program highlights at Summit Station over the last few years include: - During summer 2007 a four channel gas chromatograph was added to the suite of NOAA instruments. - During summer 2008, in addition to ongoing work, researchers extended the ozonesonde experiment by launching about 20 additional balloons in April and again in July for an intensive field campaign. - In February 2009, a NOAA staff member flew to Summit Station via the Twin Otter on a crew turnover flight to repair an instrument, departing the station on the return flight approximately one week later. - During August 2009, the NOAA field coordinator attended an on-site planning meeting. - In 2010, in addition to ongoing measurements, CPS staff relocated the Temporary Atmospheric Watch Observatory (TAWO) and instrument tower (where the NOAA instruments are mounted) to approximately 1 km south of Summit Station. - During 2011 and 2012 the NOAA field coordinator made a routine visit to Summit Station for instrument maintenance. - During 2013 the TAWO building was lifted and the TAWO tower was extended. The on-site science technicians coordinated with the Boulder-based NOAA team to support the instrumentation during the transition. - Also during 2013, the NOAA ESRL GMD deputy director traveled to Summit Station in late June for a site visit. During 2014, one NOAA researcher will travel to Summit in June for maintenance and upgrade activities. NOAA will continue to hire and deploy science technicians for all the three staffing phases. During 2015, three researchers will travel to Summit in June, July, and August for maintenance and upgrade activities. These include upgrading the meteorological sensor suite, assisting with the science impacts from the TAWO facility raise project, and performing a quality control visit to evaluate the setup of the aerosol measuring suite of instrumentation. In 2016, NOAA researchers will travel to Summit to relocate the meteorological suite of instruments from the TAWO tower to the 50m tower, install broadband solar radiometers to inter-compare with existing solar measurements from Summit station, reinstall instrument inlets on the TAWO inlet mast, and potentially reconfigure the TAWO interior layout of instruments to optimize the available footprint. Additionally, NOAA is planning to modify the CATS GC to eliminate methane containing P5 carrier gas to directly address concerns about elevated methane levels within the facility. In 2017 a field team of two will demobilize a portion of the NOAA project activities including the ozonesonde system and materials, the CATS GC, and the solar radiation suite (contingent on the timing of calibrated radiometers being returned by the Steffen/NASAAWS project). The field team will also recover components of the meteorological suite from the failed 50m tower and re-install met instruments on the TAWO tower which was relocated 80m south TAWO during June 2017. The science technician position provided via inter-agency transfer will be ended on or about 28 August 2017. Researchers may return in 2018, details are TBD.

CPS will coordinate personnel and cargo transport to and from Summit, provide access to Summit Station infrastructure, Summit user days, Kangerlussuaq user days, and science technician support with tasking shared between the NOAA and CPS year-round technicians. The PI will arrange and pay for all other logistics through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
1997Greenland - Summit0
1998Greenland - Summit0
2000Greenland - Summit0
2001Greenland - Summit0
2002Greenland - Summit0
2003Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 28 / 2003 08 / 16 / 20032
2003Greenland - Summit07 / 29 / 2003 08 / 14 / 20032
2004Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 13 / 2004 06 / 26 / 20041
2004Greenland - Summit06 / 14 / 2004 06 / 24 / 20041
2005Greenland - Kangerlussuaq02 / 09 / 2005 12 / 31 / 20054
2005Greenland - Summit02 / 11 / 2005 12 / 31 / 20054
2006Greenland - Kangerlussuaq01 / 01 / 2006 12 / 31 / 20063
2006Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2006 12 / 31 / 20063
2007Greenland - Kangerlussuaq01 / 01 / 2007 07 / 27 / 20073
2007Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2007 07 / 26 / 20073
2008Greenland - Kangerlussuaq02 / 04 / 2008 11 / 13 / 20086
2008Greenland - Summit02 / 15 / 2008 11 / 13 / 20086
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq02 / 05 / 2009 10 / 30 / 20094
2009Greenland - Summit02 / 09 / 2009 08 / 21 / 20093
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq02 / 02 / 2010 12 / 31 / 20108
2010Greenland - Summit02 / 02 / 2010 12 / 31 / 20108
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq01 / 01 / 2011 11 / 08 / 20116
2011Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2011 12 / 31 / 20116
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq01 / 01 / 2012 08 / 22 / 20125
2012Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2012 12 / 31 / 20126
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 21 / 2013 08 / 21 / 20135
2013Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2013 12 / 31 / 20137
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 02 / 2014 06 / 30 / 20143
2014Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2014 12 / 31 / 20144
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 08 / 22 / 20154
2015Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2015 10 / 16 / 20155
2016Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 23 / 2016 08 / 19 / 20163
2016Greenland - Summit06 / 25 / 2016 08 / 17 / 20163
2017Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 19 / 2017 08 / 01 / 20172
2017Greenland - Summit07 / 21 / 2017 07 / 30 / 20172
2018Greenland - Kangerlussuaq2
2018Greenland - Summit2
 


Project Title: ASIAA Radiometer (Award# ASIAA)

PI: Chen, Ming-Tang (mtchen@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw )
Phone: 0(808) 938.4708 
Institute/Department: Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: TW\Federal\NSC
Program Manager: Ms. Renee Crain (rcrain@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):

Science Summary:
With this experiment, the Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) will use a radiometer to survey sky clarity and atmospheric stability over Summit Station, Greenland, at submillimeter wavelengths. This activity is a piloting program for the possible establishment of a new station for the Very-Long-Baseline-Interferometry (VLBI) network at submilimeter wavelengths. Recent rapid progress on VLBI technique has now achieved the required spatial resolution to image the nearby Black Hole shadows, or the event horizons of the Black Hole. Proper distribution of antennas is essential to get a good quality of images, and the researchers are testing several potential site candidates at which to set a new antenna. Submillimeter observations require a very dry atmospheric condition. A cold, high altitude site, such as the Summit Station, is a good candidate for this purpose, and the final decision on site selection can only be made through extensive atmospheric monitoring of transmission parameters associated with submillimeter waves.

Logistics Summary:
The objective of the ASIAA radiometer experiment is to survey the sky clarity and the atmospheric stability from Summit Station at submillimeter wavelengths. This activity is part of a piloting program for the possible establishment of a new station for the Very-Long-Baseline-Interferometry (VLBI) network. Summit Station was selected as a potential candidate for the VLBI network because of the very dry atmospheric conditions, cold, and high altitude characteristics of the site. The radiometer was initially installed at Summit Station summer 2011 and will continue operating through winter 2014/2015. During 2011 a field team of two researchers will deploy to Summit to install the instrument. The radiometer will run autonomously for the duration of the experiment. Looking towards potential installation of an antenna near Summit Station, in 2012, the researchers will investigate options for project logistical support at the Thule Air Base. A team of three researchers will travel to Thule in early April for an eight -day site visit. They will travel to Thule via the ANG logistics chain, and then depart through Kangerlussuaq, on commercial air. Two researchers will return to Greenland in June and visit Summit Station for familiarization and planning; activities include a day trip to the future site of the Isi station. A third team member will visit Summit in August to conduct radiometer maintenance. In 2013, the instrument will continue to run with no team member travel to Greenland for this project. During 2014, a research participant will visit Summit Station for instrument maintenance and upgrades. The instrument will run autonomously through winter 2014/2015 with minimal support from the on-site science technicians. During 2015, one team member will visit Summit Station in April - May to address problems that arose with the instrument during the winter of 2014/2015.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) coordination for passengers and cargo between Kangerlussuaq and Summit Station; liquid nitrogen shared with ICECAPS for August calibration; Summit user days, power and infrastructure at Summit Station, with science technical support if on-site assistance is required. The PI will pay for these costs via an NSF-billable arrangement. For all other support, the PI will arrange and pay expenses directly.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 09 / 2011 08 / 21 / 20112
2011Greenland - Summit08 / 12 / 2011 08 / 19 / 20112
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 02 / 2012 08 / 22 / 20124
2012Greenland - Summit06 / 06 / 2012 08 / 20 / 20122
2012Greenland - Thule04 / 04 / 2012 04 / 12 / 20123
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 17 / 2013 07 / 19 / 20133
2013Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Thule07 / 10 / 2013 07 / 17 / 20133
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 03 / 2014 06 / 12 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit06 / 04 / 2014 06 / 11 / 20141
2014Greenland - Thule03 / 20 / 2014 03 / 28 / 20143
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 27 / 2015 09 / 05 / 20155
2015Greenland - Summit04 / 28 / 2015 05 / 03 / 20151
2015Greenland - Thule09 / 01 / 2015 09 / 03 / 20154
 


Project Title: Collaborative research: Spatial and temporal variability of surface albedo and light absorbing chemical species in Greenland (Award# 1204145)

PI: Courville, Zoe Renee (zoe.r.courville@usace.army.mil)
Phone: 0(603) 646.4425 
Institute/Department: Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Geophysical Sciences Division 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Blog: https://coldregionscience.wordpress.com/

Science Summary:
The collaborative team will take advantage of the currently funded Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) traveling between Thule and Summit Greenland to access a spatially diverse area of the GIS in order to better understand albedo variability and the snow properties that influence albedo. The GrIT route offers a unique opportunity to study a wide range of snow accumulation zones (i.e. the ablation zone, soaked snow zone, the percolation zone and the dry snow zone) across Greenland, which are expected to have a broad range of albedo values as well as significant variability in snow physical properties and concentrations of light absorbing compounds (i.e. dust, elemental carbon, and brown carbon). The project's field component will take place over two seasons during the spring of 2013 and 2014. The approach will include stopping along the traverse to collect coincident daily measurements of snow spectral albedo, snow physical properties (i.e. specific surface area, density), surface snow light absorption properties (i.e. wavelength dependent absorption of water soluble compounds and particulates), and the concentrations of trace elements, organic, and elemental carbon. Additionally, the temporal evolution of spectral albedo will be monitored continuously during the sunlit months using autonomous stations deployed along the traverse route to track seasonal variations of snow albedo and to help attribute these variations to the physical and chemical composition of the snow. The results of this project will yield a unique data set characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of surface albedo as well as the physical and chemical properties of Greenland snow, which are broadly useful to both modeling, ice mass balance, and remote sensing communities. Conference presentations, rapid publication of results, and most importantly close collaboration with modelers, (i.e. through work with the CESM PCWG) will ensure that this knowledge is used to improve process parameterizations in predictive global climate models. The team will also build on international collaborations begun in the Dartmouth IGERT program, including a week-long ambassadorship to Nuuk by co-PI Polashenski including lectures at the college and Katuuaq cultural center. Graduate, undergraduate, and high school student training will also be included in the project.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaborative effort between Courville (1204145, CRREL, lead), Dibb (1203876, UNH), Bergin (1203889, Duke) and Schauer (1204059, WISC) will study the chemical, physical and reflective properties of near-surface snow in northern Greenland in order to better understand the large-scale spatial variability of these properties. In 2013 and 2014, the field team will collect near-surface snow chemistry samples in combination with surface albedo and physical property measurements via a sampling transect called SAGE. The researchers proposed to leverage the existing logistical infrastructure of the Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) to enable researcher access to a large area of the Greenland Ice Sheet; but when the GrIT did not conduct a traverse in 2013, the team instead launched from and returned to Summit Station. The spring 2013 work will consist of a two phase snowmachine traverse in late-April / May. For the first phase, a team of three researchers will depart Summit Station by snowmachine to lay fuel caches. The fuel cache finished, the second phase team will depart Summit in early May to conduct the science traverse. Field team members will travel on snowmachines along the transect, collecting samples, taking measurements, and installing AWS units while tent-camping in the field at night. After returning to Summit Station in early June, the team will prepare frozen samples for shipment before departing via the ANG. The samples will be flown to Kangerlussuaq for frozen storage until they are delivered, via cold-deck flight, to Scotia. Supplement 1325396 provides additional funds due to contractor operational changes. Because the over-snow traverse is cancelled in 2013, the researchers will base from Summit Station. They will establish automated weather stations and take measurements of surface albedo, snow pit chemistry, and snow physical properties on a traverse out from Summit Station, Greenland, to an area outside of Thule AFB during a 7-week deployment in the field. A three person team with three snow machines will be used to pull the gear. In 2014, the SAGE sampling transect in northwestern Greenland will cross the GrIT route on several occasions. In late March, four researchers will arrive in Thule to prepare for the traverse, which will launch about a week later. The researchers will travel in a Pisten Bully tracked vehicle with the GrIT from Thule through the transition and crevasse zones to waypoint B11D or E on the inland ice sheet. There, the team will decouple from the traverse and travel via Pisten Bully and snowmachines to NEEM. During daily excursions, team members will sample via snow machine using the Pisten Bully and tent sled as a base camp. After obtaining fuel at NEEM the researchers will rendezvous with the GrIT on two occasions along the GrIT route to obtain additional fuel, using communications and breadcrumb trackers to pinpoint the meeting locate. This method of field improvisation will allow the researchers greater flexibility. GrIT also will establish one “cache” to provide the research team with return fuel to B11. The field team will return from the ice sheet through a portion of the crevasse zone to B11 using precise waypoints that were identified and logged on the journey out from Thule. At B11 the field team will be extracted via helicopter with the majority of their samples. Any samples and personal gear that cannot fit on the helicopter will be transported back to Thule via GrIT in June. Samples will be kept in a frozen state at Thule and flown back to Scotia, NY via the 109th Air National Guard Airlift Wing (ANG). A representative of the field team will meet the inbound 109th flight and drive the samples back to their home institution. All other project cargo will be shipped to/from Thule via AMC using a CRREL Transportation Account Code (TAC). Supplement 1427609 provides additional funds in 2014 for additional gear, personnel, flights and food not originally identified in this grant. These items will be paid for through the supplement grant.

In 2013, CPS will provide Air National Guard cargo and passenger transport between NY and Summit Station, lodging at the KISS facility, Summit user days, field/camping equipment, camper sled repairs, provision of fuel, use of snowmachines and sleds. In 2014, CPS will provide passenger transport via AMC between Baltimore and Thule, user days in Thule, en-route support from the GrIT, camping, communications and safety gear, sleds, snowmachines, fuel, and a Pisten Bully. CPS will also manage the sample transport from Thule to CONUS via the 109th. The researchers will arrange and pay for all other logistics via the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Courville T104 / 21 / 2013 06 / 04 / 20134
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 19 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20134
2013Greenland - Summit04 / 24 / 2013 06 / 06 / 20134
2014Greenland - SAGE B1104 / 28 / 2014 04 / 29 / 20144
2014Greenland - Thule03 / 27 / 2014 05 / 03 / 20144
2014Other - GrIT04 / 04 / 2014 04 / 28 / 20144
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Cool Robot to support Greenland science campaigns (Award# 0806075)

PI: Dibb, Jack E. (jack.dibb@unh.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 862.3063 
Institute/Department: U of New Hampshire, Glacier Research Group 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE
Program Manager: Mr. Peter West (pwest@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Instrument Development |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/crobots
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The proposed project will refine the Cool Robot, an autonomous solar-powered mobile robot, and demonstrate its potential to conduct significant scientific observations in Greenland over vast distances. Two field deployments, a week-long circuit around Summit Station in year two and a 1,500-km traverse from Summit to NEEM and back in year three, will collect data on snow-surface characteristics and elevations as ground truth for satellite data and air samples to assess spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric chemistry near the snow surface. Ground-based data collection is crucial to furthering our understanding of glaciology and environmental sciences in Greenland. This collaborative project among Dartmouth College, UNH and CRREL builds on a successful Small Grant for Exploratory Research, a student-based pilot study that designed, fabricated, and field-tested the simple four-wheel drive, solar-powered Cool Robot. This project will provide critical performance data on robot mobility, power systems, navigation and communications over a vast polar snowfield and thus forge a path to expand the use of mobile robots to support science and logistics operations in the Greenland. Potential uses of the Cool Robot are traverses to collect glaciological data, snow characterization to study climate change, biological sampling, atmospheric and snow chemistry and photochemistry surveys, micrometeorite sampling and site inspections for meteorite fields, crevasse detection in advance of manned traverses, airfield geophysical surveys, and routine snow-road surveys. Arrays of mobile robots would allow scientific instruments to be dynamically positioned based on preliminary data or to respond to specific events. Array-based campaigns could include study of the polar atmosphere, magnetosphere, troposphere, and sub-glacial geology using a diverse set of instruments: magnetometers, GPS receivers, snow property measurement, and ground penetrating radar. The project supports instrument development and deployment, increased logistics capability and reduced costs using the Cool Robot, and is an opportunity to train students in engineering and arctic research.

Logistics Summary:
The focus of this collaboration between 0806157 (Ray, Dartmouth, lead) and 0806075 (Dibb, UNH) is to conduct a series of tests and missions with the Yeti and Cool Robot to investigate the use and effectiveness of using an autonomous roving platform for science applications. Two field deployments, a week-long circuit around Summit Station in year two and a 1,500-km traverse from Summit to NEEM and back in year three, will collect data on snow-surface characteristics and elevations as ground truth for satellite data and air samples to assess spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric chemistry near the snow surface. These successful demonstrations will transform the logistics model for polar science campaigns. Logistic details under 0806157.

Support details will be carried under 0806157.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2011Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Science Coordination Office for Summit Station and the Greenland Traverse (Award# 1042410)

PI: Dibb, Jack E. (jack.dibb@unh.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 862.3063 
Institute/Department: U of New Hampshire, Glacier Research Group 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\RSL
Program Manager: Ms. Renee Crain (rcrain@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Data Management | Education and Outreach | Legacy Projects | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.geosummit.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The Science Coordination Office (SCO) serves the scientific community, NSF/Division of Polar Sciences (PLR), and the arctic logistics contractor by coordinating input and providing an organized advisory mechanism for PLR regarding decisions impacting Summit Station. SCO makes recommendations to CPS about ways to accommodate or mitigate conflicting requests from different science teams, and suggests ways investigators might accomplish science objectives with smaller logistical impacts. SCO advocates on behalf of the community, suggesting science-based priorities for capital investments by PLR at Summit that will maintain and enhance the value of the site for research while striving to keep the station financially sustainable. This renewal grant includes two new SCO members to represent the broader research community and diversify generations of researchers. It also adds functionality to the existing SCO by increasing SCO guidance and oversight to include research projects on the Greenland Inland Traverse and future research sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet that may host investigations similar to work done at Summit Station. This award supports activities that expand communication: significant updates to the current GEOSummit webpage (e.g. a virtual tour, Summit bibliography, and Summit GIS); a new Summit Listserv and town-hall-style meetings at the Fall AGU meeting; increased efforts at informal direct contact; and semi-annual teleconferences involving the scientific community. The SCO role in long-range and annual planning is to focus on the economic and environmental sustainability of the station in parallel with the preservation of core station scientific activities. These objectives are captured in a developing Long-range Plan for Summit Station.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration—Dibb (UNH, 1042410, LEAD), Burkhart (UC Merced, 1042531), and Hawley (Dartmouth, 1042358)—will continue support for the Summit Science Coordination Office (SCO) begun under NSF grant 0455623. The SCO was established to coordinate measurements between investigators; to optimize the sharing of facilities and personnel on-site; to provide scientific requirements to NSF, its support contractor and European partners as the facility is developed; and to stimulate sharing of data among science projects. From 2011 to 2016, SCO members will make regular trips to Summit, often combined with already-planned fieldwork in support of other grants. CPS will work closely with the SCO to develop and implement plans for Summit and the Greenland Traverse (GrIT) that meet the evolving needs of the science community. Activities in 2015 will include a continued survey of ice sheet movement in the near Summit area with a goal of determining the spatial pattern of horizontal strain that would act on multi-kilometer length of cable. This was a NSF requested study, now referred to as the Summit Strain Net study, in 2014 to better understand the implications of a number of factors in the long range plan for Summit Station. Those survey points which can be checked via foot will be; those that can’t will be accessed via snow machine. Additionally the Science Coordination Office plans to send one member for a site visit during the last flight period of the 2015 summer. In August 2016, one SCO member and one research assistant will travel to Greenland for an annual site visit, which will be made in collaboration with the Philip Lubin field team. In addition, the StrainNet survey will be completed during the same visit to avoid a separate deployment..

CPS will provide travel to/from and access to infrastructure and services at Summit Station. The PIs will arrange and pay for all other expenses through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 10 / 2012 08 / 17 / 20121
2012Greenland - Summit08 / 14 / 2012 08 / 16 / 20121
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 14 / 2013 08 / 21 / 20131
2013Greenland - Summit08 / 15 / 2013 08 / 18 / 20131
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 13 / 2014 08 / 22 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit08 / 15 / 2014 08 / 21 / 20141
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 08 / 22 / 20153
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 01 / 2015 08 / 20 / 20153
2016Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 05 / 2016 08 / 19 / 20162
2016Greenland - Summit08 / 07 / 2016 08 / 17 / 20162
 


Project Title: Collaborative research: Spatial and temporal variability of surface albedo and light absorbing chemical species in Greenland (Award# 1203876)

PI: Dibb, Jack E. (jack.dibb@unh.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 862.3063 
Institute/Department: U of New Hampshire, Glacier Research Group 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Blog: https://coldregionscience.wordpress.com/

Science Summary:
The collaborative team will take advantage of the currently funded Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) traveling between Thule and Summit Greenland to access a spatially diverse area of the GIS in order to better understand albedo variability and the snow properties that influence albedo. The GrIT route offers a unique opportunity to study a wide range of snow accumulation zones (i.e. the ablation zone, soaked snow zone, the percolation zone and the dry snow zone) across Greenland, which are expected to have a broad range of albedo values as well as significant variability in snow physical properties and concentrations of light absorbing compounds (i.e. dust, elemental carbon, and brown carbon). The project's field component will take place over two seasons during the spring of 2013 and 2014. The approach will include stopping along the traverse to collect coincident daily measurements of snow spectral albedo, snow physical properties (i.e. specific surface area, density), surface snow light absorption properties (i.e. wavelength dependent absorption of water soluble compounds and particulates), and the concentrations of trace elements, organic, and elemental carbon. Additionally, the temporal evolution of spectral albedo will be monitored continuously during the sunlit months using autonomous stations deployed along the traverse route to track seasonal variations of snow albedo and to help attribute these variations to the physical and chemical composition of the snow. The results of this project will yield a unique data set characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of surface albedo as well as the physical and chemical properties of Greenland snow, which are broadly useful to both modeling, ice mass balance, and remote sensing communities. Conference presentations, rapid publication of results, and most importantly close collaboration with modelers, (i.e. through work with the CESM PCWG) will ensure that this knowledge used to improve process parameterizations in predictive global climate models. The team will also build on international collaborations begun in the Dartmouth IGERT program, including a week-long ambassadorship to Nuuk by co-PI Polashenski including lectures at the college and Katuuaq cultural center. Graduate, undergraduate, and high school student training will also be included in the project.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaborative effort between Courville (1204145, CRREL, lead), Dibb (1203876, UNH), Bergin (1203889, Duke) and Schauer (1204059, WISC) will study the chemical, physical and reflective properties of near-surface snow in northern Greenland in order to better understand the large-scale spatial variability of these properties. Field work will take place in 2013 and 2014. Logistic details under 1204145.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Thule0
2014Other - GrIT0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: A pan-Arctic, storm-by-storm isotopic investigation of the influence of Arctic sea ice on precipitation - a crucial link in the coupled climate system (Award# 1022032)

PI: Feng, Xiahong (xiahong.feng@dartmouth.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 646.1712 
Institute/Department: Dartmouth College, Department of Earth Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Isotope Hydrology |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~iispacs/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This project will quantify the relationship between the ice-free area of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas, and evaporation and precipitation in the Arctic. The methodology uses isotopic compositions of storm-by-storm precipitation samples, pan-Arctic meteorological data, satellite sea ice data, and numerical modeling. Precipitation samples will be collected at nine Arctic observatories, and by three high schools in Greenland. Samples will be analyzed for D/H and 18O/16O ratios. The track of a given storm will be reconstructed using reanalysis data and a Lagrangian trajectory algorithm. The project will yield a quantitative understanding of the links among sea ice, and moisture sources and amounts of Arctic precipitation, which comprise an important part of climate dynamics on a wide range of time scales. The results will be pertinent to the interpretation of ice core data, ice age dynamics, abrupt climate change, and global warming. This project also intends to integrate research with education and outreach, which will directly benefit participating arctic communities. The project aims to improve community understanding of how climate change research is done, by providing arctic students with new knowledge and skills, and by inspiring them to pursue advanced studies. At the same time, the PI's will benefit from learning traditional methods of observing, categorizing, and forecasting weather and climate from the indigenous communities participating in the study.

Logistics Summary:
For this research collaboration between 1022032 (Feng, Dartmouth) and 1023651 (Burkhart, UC Merced), the PIs will conduct precipitation sampling at nine Arctic Observatories: Barrow, Atqasuk and Fairbanks, Alaska; Eureka and Cambridge Bay, Canada; Summit Station, Greenland; Cherskii and Tiksi, Russia; and Zeppelin, Norway. In addition, the scientists will work with several communities on the western coast of Greenland to establish precipitation sampling stations there. From 2011 to 2014, researchers will either visit sites or have sampling conducted by local colleagues. In 2011, at the outset of the project, a team of 1-2 will travel to the sampling sites in Alaska and Greenland to see the facilities and the surrounding landscape and to teach sampling protocols to on-site staff. The researchers also will travel to several communities in Greenland to establish relationships / initiate sampling campaigns there. Russian sampling activities will be handled by CPS contractors- in addition, the PI will visit the Cherskii and Tiksi sites. In 2012, the PI will travel to Russia to meet with project collaborators. In mid-June, two people will travel to Cherskii. They will spend about a week at Cherskiy sampling and meeting with NESS personnel; the latter will provide ongoing support at Cherskii. After returning to Moscow, the team will travel by train to St. Petersburg. There, they will spend several days meeting with personnel from AARI who will provide sampling support at Tiksi. For Greenland 2012, two project members will return to Greenland to visit Kangerlussuaq. For 2013 and 2014, all sampling activities in Alaska, Greenland and Russia will be completed by local providers. Personnel at each site will collect precipitation samples on behalf of the project team for any storm that brings at least 2.5 mm water equivalent of precipitation. Samples will be shipped to Dartmouth College, where they will be analyzed. In 2016, the results of the isotope analysis completed by AARI will be released to the PI. (No personnel travel in 2016). CPS support focuses on the work at Cherskii/Tiksi, Alaska, and the Greenlandic sites.

If needed to support project activities, CPS is authorized to provide the following services: in Greenland, ANG coordination, commercial tickets for visits to villages, lodging, Kangerlussuaq user days, and access to the Summit infrastructure and science technical services. In Russia, subcontracts for Cherskiy and Tiksi support, shipping, and for the trip to Russia in 2012, user days at Cherskiy and per diem for St. Petersburg. In Alaska, lodging and truck days in Barrow and/or Atqasuk, as well as personnel for sampling in Atqasuk. In 2016, CPS will provide payment to AARI, the Russian subcontractor, to analyze some of the Russian samples and release the results of the sample analysis to the PI The PI will arrange all other logistics and pay for them through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Alaska - Atqasuk0
2011Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)03 / 14 / 2011 03 / 19 / 20111
2011Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2011Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2011Greenland - Aasiaat08 / 07 / 2011 08 / 15 / 20112
2011Greenland - Ikerasaarsuk 08 / 07 / 2011 08 / 14 / 20112
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 17 / 2011 08 / 17 / 20112
2011Greenland - Nuuk08 / 01 / 2011 08 / 06 / 20112
2011Greenland - Summit07 / 19 / 2011 07 / 23 / 20112
2011Norway - Zeppelin0
2011Russia - Cherskii0
2011Russia - Tiksi0
2012Alaska - Atqasuk0
2012Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2012Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 10 / 2012 08 / 17 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit0
2012Norway - Zeppelin0
2012Russia - Cherskii06 / 12 / 2012 07 / 02 / 20122
2013Alaska - Atqasuk0
2013Alaska - Fairbanks0
2013Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2013Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2013Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2013Greenland - Nuuk0
2013Greenland - Qaanaaq0
2013Greenland - Qeqertarsuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2013Norway - Zeppelin0
2013Russia - Cherskii0
2013Russia - Tiksi0
2014Alaska - Atqasuk0
2014Alaska - Fairbanks0
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2014Canada - Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island0
2014Canada - Eureka Weather Station, Ellesmere Island0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2014Norway - Zeppelin0
2014Russia - Cherskii0
2014Russia - Tiksi0
2016Russia - Tiksi0
 


Project Title: Polarsonde: A Meteorological Sensor To Detect Aircraft Icing Hazard (Award# Adelaide)

PI: Hamilton, Murray (murray.hamilton@adelaide.edu.au)
Phone: 61(883) 033-.994 
Institute/Department: The University of Adelaide, Physics Department 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: AU\Research/Higher Ed
Program Manager: Ms. Renee Crain (rcrain@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Cloud Microphysics |

Project Web Site(s):
Institute: http://physsci.adelaide.edu.au/

Science Summary:
The aim of this project is to develop an expendable probe, which when attached to a standard radiosonde, will become the first low-cost routine technique to detect super-cooled liquid water in clouds. Beyond simply detecting super-cooled liquid, polarsondes will help to answer a number of scientific questions, by determining the ratio of liquid to ice in mixed-phase clouds. Current meteorological models use an ice fraction for clouds that is calculated from the temperature profile of the atmosphere. Even in the northern mid-latitudes, the few tests that have been made show that this assumed relationship is incapable of capturing the natural variability of the ice/liquid partitioning. Furthermore, observations by satellite have shown that clouds containing liquid water below 0°C are more frequent than current meteorological models predict. Radiosondes are the only routinely used meteorological device that can profile the interior of a cloud, but they are limited to sensing water vapor (as well as temperature and pressure) and not the liquid or solid phases. Polarsonde will overcome this limitation, by enhancing radiosondes to enable detection of super-cooled liquid water. It will distinguish the spherical liquid droplets from nonspherical ice crystals by exploiting the fact that they affect differently the polarization of the light that they scatter.

Logistics Summary:
This project is led by a PI from Adelaide University, Australia. He will construct a number of polarsondes with which he will make validation measurements in mixed phase clouds and fogs at Summit Station, Greenland, comparing the polarsonde against other instruments that can measure the amounts of liquid and ice in a cloud. The PI will collaborate with Dr. Matthew Shupe and Dr. David Noone at the University of Colorado (current NSF grants 0856559 and 1023574, respectively). During July 2012, the PI will travel commercially to Kangerlussuaq, and onward to Summit Station via the ANG. He will spend approximately one week on site evaluating the performance of polarsondes installed on the Summit Station 50-meter tower before departing on an ANG flight and flying homeward by commercial air. The polarsondes on the tower will be left in place for one year. Additionally, the polarsondes will occasionally be launched in conjunction with the ICECAPS radiosonde balloons. The data will be recorded and transmitted back to Adelaide by the collaborators, who will also use the data for their studies of mixed phase clouds and precipitation on the icecap. The PI will return to Summit in July 2013 to test polarsondes that have been modified to remove the shortcomings identified in the 2012 season. The PI will travel commerically to Kangerlussuaq, and onward to Summit Station via the ANG. The polarsondes on the tower will be left in place through winter 2013-2014. The data will be recorded and transmitted back to Adelaide by the collaborators, who will also use the data for their studies of mixed phase clouds and precipitation on the icecap.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) flight coordination between Kangerlussuaq and Summit Station, Summit user days, and access to infrastructure and science technician support at Summit Station for the year-round experiment. The NSF will recoup support costs directly from the PI's institution. All other costs, including accomodations in Kangerlussuaq, will be paid by the PI.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 10 / 2012 07 / 22 / 20121
2012Greenland - Summit07 / 13 / 2012 07 / 20 / 20121
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 10 / 2013 07 / 19 / 20131
2013Greenland - Summit07 / 11 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20131
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Science Coordination Office for Summit Station and the Greenland Traverse (Award# 1042358)

PI: Hawley, Robert Lyman (robert.l.hawley@dartmouth.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 646.1425  
Institute/Department: Dartmouth College, Department of Earth Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\RSL
Program Manager: Dr. Alan Craig (acraig@ncsa.uiuc.edu)
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach | Legacy Projects |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.geosummit.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The Science Coordination Office (SCO) serves the scientific community, NSF/Division of Polar Sciences (PLR), and the arctic logistics contractor by coordinating input and providing an organized advisory mechanism for PLR regarding decisions impacting Summit Station. SCO makes recommendations to CPS about ways to accommodate or mitigate conflicting requests from different science teams, and suggests ways investigators might accomplish science objectives with smaller logistical impacts. SCO advocates on behalf of the community, suggesting science-based priorities for capital investments by PLR at Summit that will maintain and enhance the value of the site for research while striving to keep the station financially sustainable. This renewal grant includes two new SCO members to represent the broader research community and diversify generations of researchers. It also adds functionality to the existing SCO by increasing SCO guidance and oversight to include research projects on the Greenland Inland Traverse and future research sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet that may host investigations similar to work done at Summit Station. This award supports activities that expand communication: significant updates to the current GEOSummit webpage (e.g. a virtual tour, Summit bibliography, and Summit GIS); a new Summit Listserv and town-hall-style meetings at the Fall AGU meeting; increased efforts at informal direct contact; and semi-annual teleconferences involving the scientific community. The SCO role in long-range and annual planning is to focus on the economic and environmental sustainability of the station in parallel with the preservation of core station scientific activities. These objectives are captured in a developing Long-range Plan for Summit Station.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration—Dibb (UNH, 1042410, LEAD), Burkhart (UC Merced, 1042531), and Hawley (Dartmouth, 1042358)—will continue support for the Summit Science Coordination Office (SCO) begun under NSF grant 0455623. The SCO was established to coordinate measurements between investigators and the sharing of facilities and personnel on-site; to provide scientific requirements to NSF, its support contractor and European partners as the facility is developed; and to stimulate sharing of data among science projects. Logistics details under 1042410.

Support details under 1042410.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Atmospheric Hydrocarbons at GEOSummit, Greenland, as Tracers for Climate Change, Air Pollution Transport, and Oxidation Chemistry in the Arctic (Award# 1108391)

PI: Helmig, Detlev (detlev.helmig@colorado.edu)
Phone: 0(303) 492.2509 
Institute/Department: U of Colorado, Boulder, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The PI will collect four years of continuous measurements of atmospheric methane, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC: ethane, ethyne, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, benzene, toluene) at the Greenland Environmental Observatory at Summit (GEOSummit). The project utilizes an existing monitoring system that has previously been operated at Summit . This gas chromatography instrument is specifically tailored towards operation at this remote arctic site as it is fully automated and remotely controllable. A second analytical channel will be added to include monitoring of the important climate gas methane with the same instrument. This project will deliver four years of continuous atmospheric concentration data of methane, with approximately two-hour time resolution, and nine C2-C7 NMHC at low parts per trillion sensitivity at Summit. These data will expand upon the previous 2008-2010 NMHC measurements from Summit, and will provide an overall eight year record for these gases (with a two year gap). These measurements will complement the NMHC monitoring within the NOAA-INSTAAR global flask sampling program, which has provided bi-weekly NMHC data for five arctic sites for the past seven years. The much higher resolution in-situ data from this study will add value to the interpretation of the NMHC flask records. By applying chemical transport modeling, the in-situ data will allow researchers to decipher air pollution transport into the Arctic and contributions from different emission source region contributions at lower latitudes. The methane and NMHC monitoring will make a pivotal contribution to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) program, as it will provide the only high time resolution in-situ NMHC site in the Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This study contributes to the Arctic Observing Network (AON) and entails continuous monitoring of atmospheric methane and non-methane (C2-C7) hydrocarbons at Summit Station, Greenland. An existing monitoring system that was operated at Summit Station for two seasons from 2008 through 2010 and then moved to Toolik Field Station (both under NSF grant #0713943), returned to Greenland in the spring of 2012. The instrumentation operates year-round, with remote monitoring by the PI and in-situ attendance by CPS science technical staff. During 2012, a team of two researchers spent a week at the station in April to install the monitoring system, and one researcher returned to Summit for maintenance activities prior to station close-out in August 2012. Similarly, for the 2013 field season the research team made two trips to Summit Station, April and August During 2014, one researcher traveled to Summit Station in February with the CPS staff turnover crew to support critical instrument maintenance (routing commercially through Iceland and utilizing the already scheduled Twin Otter charter flights to / from Summit Station). During the main summer research season, participants from the research team will travel to Summit in mid-May, and again in mid-August, for additional instrument maintenance activities. Travel to / from Summit will be via the Air National Guard logistics chain through Scotia, NY, and Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. During 2015 and 2016, one researcher will again travel to Summit Station in April/May to perform instrument maintenance activities. A subsequent trip in August will accomplish the same purpose. The instrumentation will run continuously into 2017 (via an NSF no-cost extension, originally planned to be removed in August 2016). A trip is planned for April and August.

CPS will provide ANG support for passengers and cargo, compressed hydrogen and cylinder rental, user days at the KISS facility in Kangerlussuaq, user days and access to Summit Station infrastructure, rack space in TAWO, use of the existing TAWO tower, and science technical support. The PI will arrange and pay for all other costs through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 20 / 2012 08 / 22 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit04 / 23 / 2012 08 / 20 / 20122
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 19 / 2013 08 / 21 / 20132
2013Greenland - Summit04 / 24 / 2013 08 / 18 / 20132
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 12 / 2014 08 / 22 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit02 / 20 / 2014 08 / 21 / 20141
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 24 / 2015 08 / 22 / 20152
2015Greenland - Summit04 / 28 / 2015 08 / 20 / 20152
2016Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 25 / 2016 08 / 19 / 20162
2016Greenland - Summit04 / 26 / 2016 08 / 17 / 20162
2017Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 16 / 2017 08 / 28 / 20172
2017Greenland - Summit08 / 18 / 2017 08 / 26 / 20172
 


Project Title: Danish Automatic Weather Station (Award# DKAWS)

PI: Kern-Hansen, Claus (CKH@dmi.dk )
Phone: 45(391) 57580 
Institute/Department: Danish Meteorological Institute,  
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: DK\Federal\MT\DMI
Program Manager: Dr. Jennifer Mercer (jmercer@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Institute: http://www.dmi.dk/en/vejr/
Initiative: http://www.geosummit.org/

Science Summary:
The Danish Meteorological Institute operates an Autonomous Weather Station (AWS) at Summit. This AWS is part of a network that provides forecasting and warning services as well as continuous monitoring of weather, sea state, climate, and related environmental conditions in the atmosphere, over land and in the sea.

Logistics Summary:
When required for AWS maintenance, the principal investigator and sometimes another team member will spend two to three days annually tent-camping at Summit Station. At Summit Station, he/they will remove snow from around the AWS as well as inspect and provide maintenance to the station. In 2007, the team dug out and elevated the weather station by 1 meter.

CPS will provide ANG transport between Kangerlussuaq and Summit Station and Summit user days. The PI will arrange and pay for all other logistics, including KISS user days.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
1997Greenland - Summit1
1998Greenland - Summit1
1999Greenland - Summit1
2000Greenland - Summit07 / 17 / 2001 07 / 19 / 20011
2002Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 08 / 2002 06 / 14 / 20022
2002Greenland - Summit06 / 10 / 2002 06 / 13 / 20022
2003Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 28 / 2003 08 / 02 / 20033
2003Greenland - Summit07 / 29 / 2003 08 / 01 / 20032
2004Greenland - Summit0
2005Greenland - Summit1
2006Greenland - Summit08 / 20 / 2006 08 / 21 / 20062
2007Greenland - Summit06 / 19 / 2007 06 / 21 / 20072
2008Greenland - Summit0
2009Greenland - Summit0
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 23 / 2010 06 / 30 / 20102
2010Greenland - Summit06 / 25 / 2010 06 / 28 / 20102
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 05 / 2012 06 / 13 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit06 / 06 / 2012 06 / 11 / 20122
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 30 / 2013 06 / 05 / 20132
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 31 / 2013 06 / 04 / 20132
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 10 / 2014 07 / 17 / 20142
2014Greenland - Summit07 / 11 / 2014 07 / 16 / 20142
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 30 / 2015 06 / 07 / 20152
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 03 / 2015 06 / 09 / 20152
2016Greenland - Summit0
2017Greenland - Kangerlussuaq2
2017Greenland - Summit2
2018Greenland - Kangerlussuaq2
2018Greenland - Summit2
 


Project Title: GROVER: Greenland Rover for Cryospheric Research (Award# NASAGROVER)

PI: Koenig, Lora Suzanne (lora.koenig@colorado.edu)
Phone: 0(303) 735.5408 
Institute/Department: U of Colorado, Boulder, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NASA
Program Manager: Dr. Thomas Wagner (thomas.wagner@nasa.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):

Science Summary:
The Greenland Rover for Cryospheric Research (GROVER) robot has been designed and developed over a three year period as an over snow autonomous robot for radar measurements in the polar regions. The robot is controlled via a satellite modem remotely, and receives instructions for travel direction and speed, control of the radar. It performs onboard processing of the radar data, and transmits back diagnostic information about the status of the robot and summary data from the radar. It has been tested over snow in Idaho; this project will perform proof of concept measurements at Summit Station, Greenland, in which the robot will be deployed to the IceSAT line, and controlled remotely from Summit. If all goes well, the robot will only be visited at the beginning and end of the campaign. If problems arise, the robot might need to be visited during the campaign to fix problems.

Logistics Summary:
This project supports the testing of Greenland Rover for Cryospheric Research (GROVER), an autonomous robot designed to map accumulation over the ice sheet at Summit Station, Greenland. GROVER is solar powered and carries a payload of an ultra-high frequency, frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar. The radar is capable of resolving near-surface snow layering with a vertical resolution of centimeters. During the 2013 season a field team of three will spend approximately five weeks at Summit Station in May/June. The effort will have two major objectives: (1) to map accumulation rates around the Summit region while simultaneously imaging and mapping the 2012 melt layer; and (2) to fully test GROVER’s engineering and communication links. Researchers will determine GROVER’s range, power consumption and duty cycle in an ice sheet setting to understand how they can task the robot for future missions. During 2014 a short site visit is planned for one participant during late April. The site visit will not include deployment of the robot. Researchers will continue work on the robot through 2015 with no personnel deployment under this grant.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) airlift for passengers and cargo, KISS user days, Summit user days, minimal use of a snowmachine at Summit to deploy and retrieve the GROVER (in 2013), and basic communication/safety gear. NSF will recoup costs associated with this support via an interagency funds transfer NASA to NSF. All other logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 04 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20134
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 06 / 2013 06 / 07 / 20134
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 28 / 2014 05 / 02 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit04 / 28 / 2014 04 / 30 / 20141
 


Project Title: Long-term measurements of nitrogen oxides at the GEOSummit station, Greenland (Award# 1107398)

PI: Kramer, Louisa J (lkramer@mtu.edu)
Phone: 0(906) 487.2029  
Institute/Department: Michigan Technological University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Wiseman (wwiseman@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Long-range Pollution Transport |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Pollution is often transported to the Arctic from nearby continents. Polluted air from human activities and forest fires can contain relatively high levels of nitrogen oxides. In the Arctic, these nitrogen oxides can foster the production of ozone, a significant greenhouse gas. The arctic climate is particularly sensitive to the effects of greenhouse gases, so monitoring these pollutants in the Arctic is important. This grant funds long-term measurements of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at GEOSummit, Greenland, using state-of-the-art technology. The dataset garnered from this work will expand upon measurements of nitrogen oxides performed at the site from 2008-2010, providing a robust dataset spanning nine years. The measurements will provide important information on the concentrations of nitrogen oxides transported to the Arctic, which vary both seasonally and annually, and the resulting impact on arctic ozone levels. The project will contribute to the Arctic Observing Network (AON) and the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH). Project data will be made available to researchers for studies to improve understanding of current impacts of transported pollution on greenhouse gas levels and estimates of climate change feedbacks within the Arctic. The data will also be utilized by educators for classroom teaching and they will support the training of new graduate students by providing a unique opportunity to further their research interests and educational growth in the field of atmospheric sciences.

Logistics Summary:
This project expands upon work funded by NSF grant 0713943 (PI Helmig) and a NASA grant called ‘NASAPolarCat,’ for which Kramer was a postdoc / PI. The PI will perform long-term high-frequency measurements of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at Summit Station, Greenland, from late-summer 2012 to 2015. A field team of two or three researchers will travel to Summit Station each year for approximately three weeks each time to calibrate/maintain the instrument. The researchers will travel to and from Summit Station via the Air National Guard. The 2012 objectives involve instrument installation, testing, and trouble-shooting; and training the CPS science technicians on experiment protocols. These objectives will require two researchers to spend approximately four weeks on station beginning in late June. During 2013, the research team will return to Summit Station for maintenance and troubleshooting activities. These objectives will require two researchers to visit Summit Station during different deployments of varying length. During 2014 three researchers will visit Summit Station, with deployments beginning in April, for calibration and maintenance activities. In 2015 the PI accepted a position in the UK. With no co-PIs or alternates, the decision was to demobilize the experiment during April/May 2015. Two science team members will travel to Summit to disassemble and pack up the instrument, equipment and compressed gasses for southbound shipment. These items will be returned from Summit to CONUS during May 2015 (approximately).

CPS will provide ANG support for passengers and cargo, compressed gases and cylinder rental, user days in Kangerlussuaq, user days and access to Summit infrastructure, project workspace in the Temporary Atmospheric Watch Observatory (TAWO), access to the TAWO tower, and science technician support. The PI will arrange and pay for all other logistics through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 25 / 2012 07 / 22 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit06 / 26 / 2012 07 / 20 / 20122
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 04 / 2013 08 / 21 / 20132
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 06 / 2013 08 / 19 / 20132
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 12 / 2014 08 / 22 / 20143
2014Greenland - Summit05 / 14 / 2014 07 / 20 / 20143
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 24 / 2015 05 / 05 / 20152
2015Greenland - Summit04 / 28 / 2015 05 / 03 / 20152
 


Project Title: Continued Core Atmospheric and Snow Measurements at the Summit, Greenland Environmental Observatory (Award# 0856845)

PI: McConnell, Joseph R ( joe.mcconnell@dri.edu)
Phone: 0(775) 673.7348 
Institute/Department: Desert Research Institute, Division of Hydrologic Sciences 
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Geological Sciences | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://www.aoncadis.org/projects/continued_core_at...
Institute: http://www.geosummit.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This award supports the continuation and expansion of long-term measurements of the Arctic atmosphere, snow, and other Earth system components at the Summit, Greenland, Environmental Observatory (GEOSummit). The original measurement program began in 2003 and contributes to the Arctic Observing Network (AON) and the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH). Year-round measurements at least 10 years in duration are required to observe and quantify the roles of large-scale, multiyear oscillations in oceanic and atmospheric circulation (e.g., Arctic Oscillation) as well as long-term changes in industrial emissions and land use. Long-term, broad-spectrum, and high-time-resolution measurements also are required to determine transport pathways and other linkages between low- and mid-latitude industrial emission sources and Arctic climate. Because transport pathways vary strongly with altitude and Summit is the only high elevation observing site in the Arctic and well separated from local emission sources, it is an essential node in AON. Located at an elevation of 3,100 m on the Greenland ice sheet, GEOSummit is part of a network that includes sites at Barrow, Alaska; Alert, Canada; and Mt. Zeppelin, Svalbard. The "Broader Impacts" of these observations are numerous and include the potential to transform understanding of the role of natural and anthropogenic aerosols in climate forcing, to improve climate models and the prediction of future Arctic environmental change, and to enhance the interpretation of ice core records of paleo-environmental variability. The program also will include education and training, with an emphasis on the participation of under-represented groups, through the involvement of undergraduate and graduate students, and a postdoctoral associate.

Logistics Summary:
This grant continues measurements begun under grant #0336450 (Bales). The goal of the project is to continue and expand ongoing long-term measurements of the arctic atmosphere, snow, and other Earth system components at the Summit Greenland Environmental Observatory (GEOSummit). The long-term measurements program at GEOSummit is a close partnership between the Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of California (UC-Merced, UC-Davis), NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division (GMD), and others. The Long Term Observations (LTO) grant funds a suite of year-round measurements from 2009 through 2014, supported by on-site science technicians. In addition to the LTO measurements, Summit Station technical staff will carry out measurements initiated by investigators under other grants, including a significant sampling campaign by NOAA, Baseline Surface Radiation Network, and 50-meter tower experiments at Summit. During campaigns each summer, the research team will conduct field measurements and instrument maintenance. The research deployments will occur seperately for different investigators associated with the project. Additionally, the Steffen deployment to support this project will be conduted in conjunction with the NASAAWS effort. On-site science technicians will take over on year-round measurements when the research team is not on-site. In 2010, PolarTREC teacher, James Pottinger (0956825JP) will join the team for their fieldwork at Summit Station. This project’s field work in June 2011 will involve a team of six—three researchers and again PolarTREC teacher James Pottinger for co-PI Koni Steffen; and a team of two researchers for PI Joe McConnell. The Steffen team will fly to Summit Station in early June via Twin Otter; about a week later, the McConnell team will arrive at Summit via the ANG logistics chain from Kangerlussuaq. In 2013, the ongoing research will be supported with a late-May site visit from a team of four researchers led by co-PI Konrad Steffen. While at Summit the team will service the AWS, the BSRN instruments, and the lower level of the 50-meter tower. The team will arrive and depart Summit Station via Twin Otter as part of the NASAAWS effort. In addition, in July of 2013, one team member will make a trip to Summit to repair an instrument. In 2014, the ongoing research will be supported with a late-May site visit from a team of four researchers led by co-PI Konrad Steffen. While at Summit the team will service the AWS, the BSRN instruments, and the lower level of the 50-meter tower. The team will arrive and depart Summit Station via Twin Otter as part of the NASA AWS effort.

CPS will provide ANG coordination for shipment of cargo and cold samples, user days and access to the Summit Station infrastructure, science technician services (including instrument operation, maintenance, and sample collection), ISC boxes and supplies, Milli-Q filters and other assorted materials, and access to the existing 50-meter tower (either training for grantees or an appropriately trained science technician). The researchers will pay for other costs through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq2
2009Greenland - Summit2
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 12 / 2010 08 / 22 / 20104
2010Greenland - Summit08 / 13 / 2010 08 / 20 / 20104
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 07 / 2011 06 / 15 / 20112
2011Greenland - Summit06 / 03 / 2011 06 / 13 / 20116
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 21 / 2012 06 / 14 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit05 / 23 / 2012 06 / 12 / 20123
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 11 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20131
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 29 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20135
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq08 / 14 / 2014 08 / 20 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit08 / 15 / 2014 08 / 21 / 20141
2015Greenland - Summit0
2016Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Participant Support for the Zero Emissions Category of the Clean Snowmobile Challenge (Award# 1062619)

PI: Meldrum, Jay (jmeldrum@mtu.edu)
Phone: 0(906) 487.3178 
Institute/Department: Michigan Technological University, Keweenaw Research Center 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE
Program Manager: Mr. Peter West (pwest@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach | Instrument Development\Appropriate Technologies for Polar Regions |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://students.sae.org/cds/snowmobile/
Institute: http://www.mtukrc.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The Keweenaw Research Center (KRC) of Michigan Tech University (MTU) has hosted and will continue to host the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) event for the next three years at its 500-acre test track near Houghton, Michigan. University teams from across the US and Canada compete for the title of cleanest and quietest snowmobile. This grant encourages university teams to participate in the challenge by reimbursing travel expenses and other participant costs associated with the competitions’ Zero Emissions category. Conventional snowmobiles are suitable as transportation in extreme polar locations; however, due to their higher carbon emissions, they are less suitable where their output would skew the research results. The Zero Emission category of CSC challenges undergraduate students to look for solutions to this problem. In doing so they learn the needs of the polar research program and they also learn about electrification of transportation vehicles, a timely topic as we search for alternatives to the use of fossil fuels for energy. The SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge provides a venue for students to search for solutions to the needs of the NSF's arctic research effort.At the same time, it provides a conduit for public dissemination of the work of the polar program.

Logistics Summary:
This project continues NSF award 0808798 and supports travel and participation expenses for teams competing in the zero emissions category of the Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) from 2012 - 2014. In addition, each year one team in the zero-emissions category may be invited to demonstrate its vehicle technology and field test its snowmobile at Summit Station. This opportunity gives the students first-hand knowledge of the conditions under which the snowmobile must operate. Each year beginning in 2012, one student team member may be selected to visit Summit Station for about a week. The student will introduce the vehicle to the Summit community and also tour the facilities and the experiments at the station. The snowmobile may remain after the student's departure, operating for the duration of the field season before it is returned to the home institution. The zero emission snowmobile is used at Summit Station to access the satellite camp and other 'clean air' sectors. This allows researchers to quickly, efficiently and safely access their sites without compromising data collection. (No participant traveled to Summit in 2014).

For each team member who is invited to Summit Station, CPS will provide shipping for the snowmachine, participant travel, and user days at Summit and Kangerlussuaq. The PI will arrange and pay for all other logistics through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 14 / 2012 05 / 25 / 20121
2012Greenland - Summit05 / 16 / 2012 05 / 17 / 20121
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20131
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 31 / 2013 06 / 07 / 20131
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 26 / 2015 07 / 17 / 20151
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 28 / 2015 07 / 15 / 20151
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Investigating the potential of carbon-14 in polar firn and ice as a tracer of past cosmic ray flux and an absolute dating tool (Award# 1203779)

PI: Petrenko, Vasilii V (vpetrenk@ur.rochester.edu)
Phone: 0(585) 276.6094 
Institute/Department: U of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate | Space Physics |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This grant will investigate the potential of carbon-14 in ice cores as an absolute dating tool, as a tracer of the past cosmic ray flux and as a recorder of the past fossil fraction of the global methane budget. Cosmic ray particles produce carbon-14 from oxygen-16 directly within near-surface glacial ice and firn. This in-situ produced carbon-14 quickly reacts to form 14C-containing carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane in the ice matrix. Some or all of the resulting 14C-bearing gases may be lost from the firn to the atmosphere. This research will provide a thorough characterization of in-situ cosmogenic 14C in glacial firn and shallow ice in the Summit region of Greenland. It will examine the retention of cosmogenic 14C in ice grains at all depth levels in the firn column, the partitioning of 14C between carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane, as well as the production rates and accumulation of cosmogenic 14C in shallow ice below firn close-off. This project will establish a new international collaboration between University of Rochester (UR) and University of Bern and result in novel laboratory and field analytical systems. The data from the study will be made available to the scientific community and the broad public through the ACADIS data service. One graduate student will be trained at UR, and one postdoc and one graduate student will be partially supported at Oregon State University. Three UR undergraduates will be involved in fieldwork and research. The work will support an early career scientist. All of the investigators will continue to participate in public outreach.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration is between Petrenko (1203779, U of Rochester, lead), Severinghaus (1203686, UCSD) and Brook (1204084, OSU) to study the production and retention of cosmogenic carbon-14 in polar firn. During three years of field work beginning in 2013, teams will drill and harvest ice from a camp in the vicinity of Summit Station, Greenland; they also will sample firn air in 2013. In early May 2013, a team of nine, including three drillers, will travel via the ANG logistics chain to Summit Station. From Summit, they will use snowmachines to reach their field camp located 10km NNW. The team will camp at the site for approximately one month where they will drill cores and collect firn air samples. Researchers will return weekly to Summit Station to resupply food and other stores. At the end of the field season, the team will return to Summit Station and depart via the ANG. CPS will arrange for core transport from Summit, with appropriate cold storage at points en route. During 2014 a field team of eight will return to the Summit Station area, and work from a field camp at the same location as 2013. Cores will be collected using the IDDO Blue Ice Drill, and with the exception of six boxes of samples, the cores will be processed on-site using a propane melter. The team will camp at the site for approximately six weeks with weekly trips to Summit Station for use of station resources. At the end of the field season, the team will return to Summit Station and depart via the ANG logistics chain. CPS will arrange for core transport from Summit, with appropriate cold storage at points en route. During 2015, the third and final year of the project, a team of 9 researchers and two drillers will travel via the ANG logistics chain to Summit Station. From Summit, they will use snow machines to return to their field camp located approximately 10km NNW of the station. The team will camp at the site for approximately 6 weeks where they will drill cores and collect firn air samples. Researchers will process the cores on site using a propane melter to extract gas samples. Researchers will return weekly to Summit Station to resupply food and other stores.

For the combined Petrenko led projects (1203779 and 1406236), CPS will provide ANG airlift for the field team and cargo; en route user days at Kangerlussuaq and Summit Station; field camp and safety equipment from the CPS inventory; construction support for camp setup / takedown and various support requirements (i.e. core storage trench, melter platform, and sample trays); provision of generator support and fuel; provision of food; CPS Camp Coordinator support; and shipment for up to 100 ice core boxes of frozen samples Summit > Kangerlussuaq > NY > NICL. IDDO will provide the drill and related drilling support while in the field. All other logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 04 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20139
2013Greenland - Petrenko Camp05 / 08 / 2013 06 / 04 / 20139
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 06 / 2013 06 / 06 / 20139
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 12 / 2014 06 / 30 / 201410
2014Greenland - Petrenko Camp05 / 15 / 2014 06 / 27 / 201410
2014Greenland - Summit05 / 14 / 2014 06 / 28 / 201410
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 07 / 01 / 20155
2015Greenland - Petrenko Camp06 / 03 / 2015 06 / 28 / 20155
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 01 / 2015 06 / 03 / 20155
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Cool Robot to support Greenland science campaigns (Award# 0806157)

PI: Ray, Laura R (laura.ray@dartmouth.EDU)
Phone: 0(603) 646.1243 
Institute/Department: Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE
Program Manager: Mr. Peter West (pwest@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Instrument Development\Atmospheric Chemistry | Instrument Development\Glaciology |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/crobots
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This collaborative project between Dartmouth College, UNH and CRREL builds on a successful Small Grant for Exploratory Research, a student-based pilot study that designed, fabricated, and field-tested the simple four-wheel drive, solar-powered Cool Robot. This project will refine the Cool Robot, an autonomous solar-powered mobile robot, and work with the Yeti robot to demonstrate potential to conduct significant scientific observations in Greenland over vast distances. A field deployment for testing and preliminary studies around Summit Station will collect data on snow-surface characteristics and elevations as ground truth for satellite data and air samples to assess spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric chemistry near the snow surface. Ground-based data collection is crucial to furthering our understanding of glaciology and environmental sciences in Greenland. This project will provide critical performance data on robot mobility, power systems, navigation and communications over a vast polar snowfield and thus forge a path to expand the use of mobile robots to support science and logistics operations in the Greenland. Potential uses of the Cool Robot are traverses to collect glaciological data, snow characterization to study climate change, biological sampling, atmospheric and snow chemistry and photochemistry surveys, micrometeorite sampling and site inspections for meteorite fields, crevasse detection in advance of manned traverses, airfield geophysical surveys, and routine snow-road surveys. Arrays of mobile robots would allow scientific instruments to be dynamically positioned based on preliminary data or to respond to specific events. Array-based campaigns could include study of the polar atmosphere, magnetosphere, troposphere, and sub-glacial geology using a diverse set of instruments: magnetometers, GPS receivers, snow property measurement, and ground penetrating radar. The project supports instrument development and deployment, increased logistics capability and reduced costs using the Cool Robot, and is an opportunity to train students in engineering and arctic research.

Logistics Summary:
The focus of this collaboration between 0806157 (Ray, Dartmouth, lead) and 0806075 (Dibb, UNH) is to conduct tests and missions with the Yeti robot to investigate the effectiveness of using an autonomous roving platform for science applications. A field deployment around Summit Station in 2011 will collect data on snow-surface characteristics and elevations as ground truth for satellite data and air samples to assess spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric chemistry near the snow surface. In 2011, two student researchers spent eight days at Summit Station conducting preliminary testing with the Yeti robot. Travel to Greenland was via the ANG logistics chain through Scotia, New York, and support was provided on site at Summit Station. In June of 2013, three researchers will return to Summit Station with two instrument packages and the Cool Robot. They will conduct experiments around the station to 1) collect aersol measurements to better understand the “footprint” of the station; and 2) study the spatial extent, continuity and characteristics of the ice layer.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) coordination for passengers and cargo, user days in Kangerlussuaq, user days and access to Summit infrastructure. The PI will pay for all other logistics through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 13 / 2011 07 / 25 / 20112
2011Greenland - Summit07 / 15 / 2011 07 / 23 / 20112
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 03 / 2013 06 / 28 / 20133
2013Greenland - Summit06 / 04 / 2013 06 / 27 / 20133
 


Project Title: Greenland, Denmark, United States Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) (Award# JSEP)

PI: Reed, Lynn Foshee ()
Phone:  
Institute/Department: National Science Foundation,  
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE
Program Manager: Ms. Elizabeth Rom (elrom@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach |

Project Web Site(s):
Blog: http://polarfield.com/blog/laura-lukes-classroom-f...
Project: http://www.arcus.org/jsep
Home: http://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/greenland-edu...
Home: http://www.polartrec.com/expeditions/joint-science...
Home: https://www.polartrec.com/forum/greenland-educatio...
Media: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5FnvI4py6c&featur...

Science Summary:
The US-Denmark-Greenland Joint Committee was established in 2004 to broaden and deepen cooperation among the United States, the Kingdom of Denmark, and Greenland. Since its launch the Joint Committee has established an impressive track record of accomplishments that span a range of issues of mutual concern, including culture, education, science, environmental research, technical assistance, and commercial affairs. The Joint Committee meets annually to assess its ongoing work and to evaluate new project proposals. One such Joint Committee activity is Science Education Week. This annual event, first offered in 2007, gives a select group of Greenlandic, Danish and U.S. secondary school students and educators an opportunity to visit and study the Greenland ice sheet during the summer research season. Science education week supports participant visits to several research sites in Greenland; expedition members spend about a week in Greenland learning about the research conducted there and the logistics involved in supporting the research. They also get first-hand experience conducting experiments and developing inquiry-based educational activities.

Logistics Summary:
Starting in 2007, a group of students and teachers from the US, Greenland and Denmark annually will spend a week visiting the Greenland ice sheet on a brief tour of active field sites to better understand the research done there and the complex logistics involved in supporting the work. Each year, a group assembles in Kangerlussuaq, the US participants arriving via Air National Guard (ANG) transport from New York. After an orientation lecture, the group will tour the local science facilities such as the Kellyville observatory and will visit science projects local to the area. As able, the team will assist researchers with their experiments. Later in the week, the visitors will fly via ANG to Summit Station to meet scientists, tour the facilities, and assist on routine science conducted at the station. In 2011-2012, participants will also fly on to NEEM to see the ice core drilling taking place there. On return to Kangerlussuaq, the team may take other tours before debriefing and returning to their home institutes. In late June 2007, a group of about 16 (including media and program escorts) will assemble in Kangerlussuaq. After a tour of research done in the area, the team will fly via ANG to Summit for an overnight stay. In early July 2008, approximately 12 participants will join the tour, headed by Kathy Gorski, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for 2008-2009. In 2009, a trip similar to 2008 is planned. Jennifer Thompson, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow 2009-2010, will lead this team. Also in 2009, Glen Schuster (0732793, SPRINTT) will accompany the group to Kangerlussuaq and Summit. Afterwards, Mr. Schuster and Jennifer Thompson will visit educators in Nuuk, Aasait, and Illuisat, Greenland. The logisitcs are covered under 0732793 in this database. In 2012 a student in the IGERT program (Ross Virginia, Dartmouth, PI) will join the Science in Education group to mentor the younger scholars. In 2013, the program kicks off with a two-week field school course in July in Kangerlussuaq led by the Greenland component of the program. After, a subset of students continues in the program to visiting Summit Station led by the U.S component of the program. The group will connect with the IGERT program (Ross Virginia, Dartmouth, PI) at Summit Station to mentor younger scholars. In 2014, the program again kicks off with the two-week Field School course in July in Kangerlussuaq led by the Greenland component of the program. A subset of students then continues in the program with a visit to Summit Station led by the U.S component of the program. A teacher sponsored by the Chilean Antarctic Institute will participate in the entire JSEP program. One member of the IGERT program (NSF grant 0801490, Ross Virginia, Dartmouth, PI) will join the Science Education Week group at Summit Station to help mentor younger scholars. This project's work is continued under NSF grant 1506155. The team will be lead by Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellows as follows: Martha Canipe (2010), Laura Lukes (2011), Shelly Hynes (2012) and Lynne Reed (2013 and 2014).

For the American participants, CPS will provide commercial air tickets between home and Albany, New York, lodging and per diem (the latter by reimbursement) for domestic travel, commercial air and an escort in Copenhagen for 3 U.S. students flying home after the Field School portion of the program, (by reimbursement) travel/evacuation insurance for all participants and Field School user fees. For all participants, CPS will provide clearances for ANG transport, user days at Summit, vehicle rental in Kangerlussuaq, cold-weather gear, an escort during the Science Education week, field, safety, and communications equipment and meal tickets in Kangerlussaq during SciEd. The Chilean teacher will pay for travel between Chile and Albany, New York and CPS will pay all of her other expenses; CPS will pay for one night at KISS for a visiting lecturer for Field School. All other expenses for Greenlandic and Danish students will be paid by the other host organizations.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2007Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2007Greenland - Summit0
2008Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2008Greenland - Summit0
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 07 / 2009 07 / 14 / 200914
2009Greenland - Summit07 / 09 / 2009 07 / 12 / 200914
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 19 / 2010 07 / 26 / 201015
2010Greenland - NEEM07 / 23 / 2010 07 / 24 / 201013
2010Greenland - Summit07 / 21 / 2010 07 / 23 / 201014
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 27 / 2011 07 / 25 / 201117
2011Greenland - NEEM07 / 16 / 2011 07 / 18 / 20115
2011Greenland - Summit07 / 19 / 2011 07 / 22 / 201114
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 25 / 2012 07 / 22 / 201219
2012Greenland - NEEM07 / 18 / 2012 07 / 22 / 201214
2012Greenland - Summit07 / 13 / 2012 07 / 16 / 201214
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 25 / 2013 07 / 19 / 20139
2013Greenland - Summit07 / 12 / 2013 07 / 16 / 201317
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 24 / 2014 07 / 23 / 201428
2014Greenland - Summit07 / 11 / 2014 07 / 16 / 201414
 


Project Title: Collaborative research: Spatial and temporal variability of surface albedo and light absorbing chemical species in Greenland (Award# 1204059)

PI: Schauer, James J (jjschauer@wisc.edu)
Phone: 0(608) 262.4495 
Institute/Department: U of Wisconsin, Madison, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Blog: https://coldregionscience.wordpress.com/

Science Summary:
The collaborative team will take advantage of the currently funded Greenland Inland Traverse (GrIT) traveling between Thule and Summit Greenland to access a spatially diverse area of the GIS in order to better understand albedo variability and the snow properties that influence albedo. The GrIT route offers a unique opportunity to study a wide range of snow accumulation zones (i.e. the ablation zone, soaked snow zone, the percolation zone and the dry snow zone) across Greenland, which are expected to have a broad range of albedo values as well as significant variability in snow physical properties and concentrations of light absorbing compounds (i.e. dust, elemental carbon, and brown carbon). The project's field component will take place over two seasons during the spring of 2013 and 2014. The approach will include stopping along the traverse to collect coincident daily measurements of snow spectral albedo, snow physical properties (i.e. specific surface area, density), surface snow light absorption properties (i.e. wavelength dependent absorption of water soluble compounds and particulates), and the concentrations of trace elements, organic, and elemental carbon. Additionally, the temporal evolution of spectral albedo will be monitored continuously during the sunlit months using autonomous stations deployed along the traverse route to track seasonal variations of snow albedo and to help attribute these variations to the physical and chemical composition of the snow. The results of this project will yield a unique data set characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of surface albedo as well as the physical and chemical properties of Greenland snow, which are broadly useful to both modeling, ice mass balance, and remote sensing communities. Conference presentations, rapid publication of results, and most importantly close collaboration with modelers, (i.e. through work with the CESM PCWG) will ensure that this knowledge used to improve process parameterizations in predictive global climate models. The team will also build on international collaborations begun in the Dartmouth IGERT program, including a week-long ambassadorship to Nuuk by co-PI Polashenski including lectures at the college and Katuuaq cultural center. Graduate, undergraduate, and high school student training will also be included in the project.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaborative effort between Courville (1204145, CRREL, lead), Dibb (1203876, UNH), Bergin (1203889, Duke) and Schauer (1204059, WISC) will study the chemical, physical and reflective properties of near-surface snow in northern Greenland in order to better understand the large-scale spatial variability of these properties. Field work will take place in 2013 and 2014. Logistic details under 1204145.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Thule0
2014Other - GrIT0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Investigating the potential of carbon-14 in polar firn and ice as a tracer of past cosmic ray flux and an absolute dating tool (Award# 1203686)

PI: Severinghaus, Jeffrey P (jseveringhaus@ucsd.edu)
Phone: 0(858) 822.2483 
Institute/Department: U of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate | Space Physics |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This grant will investigate the potential of carbon-14 in ice cores as an absolute dating tool, as a tracer of the past cosmic ray flux and as a recorder of the past fossil fraction of the global methane budget. Cosmic ray particles produce carbon-14 from oxygen-16 directly within near-surface glacial ice and firn. This in-situ produced carbon-14 quickly reacts to form 14C-containing carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane in the ice matrix. Some or all of the resulting 14C-bearing gases may be lost from the firn to the atmosphere. This research will provide a thorough characterization of in-situ cosmogenic 14C in glacial firn and shallow ice in the Summit region of Greenland. It will examine the retention of cosmogenic 14C in ice grains at all depth levels in the firn column, the partitioning of 14C between carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane, as well as the production rates and accumulation of cosmogenic 14C in shallow ice below firn close-off. A thorough understanding of cosmogenic C-14 in firn and shallow ice will likely enable the use of C-14 in ice for one or more of the following applications:
 1) If a relatively large amount of cosmogenic 14C is present in ice below the depth at which air bubbles become sealed off, it will be useful as a tracer for past cosmic ray flux. The investigators believe that this is the likely case for 14C-carbon monoxide. 2) If the amount of retained in-situ-produced 14C-carbon dioxide is relatively small compared to 14C-carbon dioxide from trapped air, the study will demonstrate the validity of using 14C-carbon dioxide for absolute dating of ice cores; this has long been a target of ice core studies. 3) If the amount of retained in-situ-produced 14C-methane is relatively small compared to 14C-methane from trapped air, the study will demonstrate the validity of using 14C-methane in glacial ice for determinations of the fossil fraction of the past methane budget, including releases from methane clathrates. This project will establish a new international collaboration between University of Rochester (UR) and University of Bern and result in novel laboratory and field analytical systems. The data from the study will be made available to the scientific community and the broad public through the ACADIS data service. One graduate student will be trained at UR, and one postdoc and one graduate student will be partially supported at Oregon State University. Three UR undergraduates will be involved in fieldwork and research. The work will support an early career scientist. All of the investigators will continue to participate in public outreach.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Petrenko (1203779, U of Rochester), Severinghaus (1203686, UCSD) and Brook (1204084, OSU) will conduct a 3 year project drilling in the vicinity of Summit Station (~5 km away from the Station proper). Logistic details located under 1203779.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2014Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2015Greenland - Petrenko Camp0
2015Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) (Award# 0856559)

PI: Shupe, Matthew D (matthew.shupe@colorado.edu)
Phone: 0(303) 497.6471 
Institute/Department: U of Colorado, Boulder, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences 
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Erica Key (ekey@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This award supports a field campaign that will expand the Arctic Observing Network (AON) by adding cloud, atmosphere, and precipitation measurements, and associated higher-order data products, to Summit, Greenland, at the top of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The proposed instrument suite consists of a cloud radar, two microwave radiometers, an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, an X-band precipitation sensor, a ceilometer, a micropulse lidar, and a twice-daily radiosonde program. Measurements from this advanced suite of instruments, combined with some ongoing measurements at Summit, will be input for a number of algorithms to produce climatically useful geophysical data products to support GIS-specific and Arctic-wide research. Data products will include: (1) Atmospheric State - temperature and moisture profiles through the troposphere and lower stratosphere; (2) Cloud Macrophysics - cloud occurrence, vertical boundaries, and temperatures; (3) Cloud Microphysics - cloud phase, water content, optical depth, and particle size; (4) Precipitation - precipitation type and rate; and (5) Cloud Radiative Forcing - impact of clouds on the surface radiation balance. Together these products will augment similar data sets that are produced at other locations across the Arctic. It is anticipated and intended that these data sets will be widely used by the broader scientific community to understand the climates of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the broader Arctic Basin and to validate satellite retrievals and model simulations over Greenland. The "Broader Impacts" of this award are numerous. The proposed observations will contribute to the goals of the Study of Arctic Environmental Change (SEARCH). They will be the first of their kind on the Greenland Ice Sheet and will expand the existing, although modest, network of such measurements across the Arctic. Uncertainty in polar cloud properties is a major deficiency in current models of polar climate; the proposed observations of cloud macro- and micro-physics will provide some of the necessary constraints for improving model cloud algorithms. This project will provide important field work and data processing experience for graduate students at the University of Wisconsin, University of Colorado and University of Idaho. In addition, data and experiences from the field program will be integrated into undergraduate coursework at the University of Idaho and summer workshops at the University of Wisconsin.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between 0856773 (Walden, U of Idaho), 0904152 (Turner, U of WI), and 0856559 (Shupe, CU) plans an intensive cloud experiment at Summit with fieldwork from late spring 2010 through late spring 2014. A short reconnaissance trip is planned for summer 2009. Logistical details under 0856773.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2009Greenland - Summit0
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2010Greenland - Summit0
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2012Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: FESD Type 1: Sun to Ice--Impacts on Earth of Extreme Solar Events (Award# 1135432)

PI: Spence, Harlan E (harlan.spence@unh.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 862.0322 
Institute/Department: U of New Hampshire, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\AGS
Program Manager: Dr. Therese Jorgensen (tjorgens@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This grant supports a 5-year research project that explores extreme solar events and their effects on Earth. The project draws together scientists from many different disciplines to tackle a question of growing importance to our society: What extremes of solar activity produce powerful space-weather- effects at Earth that pose risks to society? We know that the Sun is capable of creating explosive events and that these events generate dangerous streams of charged particles that can arrive at Earth moments later. We also know that these solar particles can slam into our atmosphere and affect its chemistry, including in the ozone layer. These same particles can cripple satellite systems we depend on in everyday life (GPS, communications, etc.), and pose radiation risks to astronauts and even to airline passengers. However, we only have measured such events during the space age over the past 50 years, a brief wink of time compared to the age of the Sun and solar system. "Sun-to-Ice" investigates extreme solar events and their effects on Earth by detailed studies of the physical processes linking the Sun to Earth. The researchers will study how solar eruptions lead to giant blasts of material called coronal mass ejections and how these evolve in space once they leave the Sun. The PI will investigate the processes by which these extreme solar events accelerate charged particles and how these particles are transported from the Sun to Earth, and how they enter the Earth's atmosphere and how they change its chemical properties. Finally, researchers also will study how chemical signatures of these events are recorded in ice near the poles. By confirming a link between extreme solar activity and the ice-core record, deep ice cores can help researchers unravel the history of ancient solar activity and establish the range of extreme solar events. This project seeks to make breakthroughs in diverse, complex and interlinked systems that cross the boundaries between space physics, atmospheric, and ice core science, yielding insights into the genesis of extreme events and their impact on Earth.

Logistics Summary:
This grant supports a study of the physical processes of the Sun-Earth system including coronal mass ejections (CME) and solar energetic particle acceleration and transport. As part of this systemic study, researchers will study how chemical signatures of solar events (like CMEs) are recorded in ice near the poles. Beginning in 2012 and for four consecutive years after, science technicians on site at Summit Station, Greenland, will perform six months of daily sampling following a potential CME event. (There were no CME events in 2013 or 2014). The PI or his designee will request the sampling support as needed; no project personnel are expected to deploy to Greenland.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) cargo support for necessary sampling supplies and potential retro cargo of snow samples, and--dependent on a qualifying solar event--science-technician support to collect daily samples for up to 6 months each time. The PI will arrange and pay for all other support through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2012Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Summit0
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Summit0
2016Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: GEOFON (GEOFOrschungsNetz - Geo Research Network) (Award# DESeismic)

PI: Strollo, Angelo ( strollo@gfz-potsdam.de)
Phone: 49(331) 288.1285 
Institute/Department: GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, GEOFON Program 
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: DE\Research/Higher Ed\GFZ Potsdam
Program Manager: Dr. Jennifer Mercer (jmercer@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
Institute: http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/
Initiative: http://www.geosummit.org/

Science Summary:
Most knowledge about the deeper interior of the earth is derived from seismological records. Seismic waves generated by earthquakes travel through the globe and sample its major structures on the way. Important information about seismic velocities and densities, structural boundaries, mineral composition, temperature and pressure regimes etc are hidden in each recorded seismogram and can be retrieved by inverse methods. To obtain a complete picture, globally distributed high quality broadband seismological stations are required to record a full seismologically range in terms of frequency content (10**2 – 10**-6 Hz) and dynamic range (10**-9 – 10**-1 m/s). The technical equipment of the GEOFON network fullfills these requirements and is installed in 50 stations worldwide. (Near) real-time data transmission (via the Internet) from most stations makes the GEOFON data immediately available to the scientifc community and provides a perfect tool for rapid determination of earthquake source parameters for scientific purposes but also for earthquake and tsunami early warnings and for use by disaster management. Both near real-time and archive data are openly available to the community from the GEOFON Data Center and are shared with other national and international data centers such as the european ORFEUS Data Center in De Bilt (Netherlands) and the global FDSN/IRIS Data Center (Seattle, USA).

Logistics Summary:
This project makes broadband seismological recordings of global earthquakes at Summit, Greenland. Formerly a part of the temporary GLATIS network, project responsibility has been turned over to GFZ Potsdam. Summit instruments have been included in that institute's GEOFON network. The PI (Hanka, then Strollo starting in 2015) will visit Summit Station annually to service and maintain the project's seismological station. Over the years, in addition to the scheduled maintenance, project personnel have visited Summit for various other project needs: In 2002, they installed an upgraded datalogger for the seismological station and a "Seiscomp" box that connected the station to the Summit LAN for Internet real-time data transmission; in 2004, another major station upgrade overcame technical problems and minimized required local support; finally, in 2007, two technicians raised and relocated the seismometer bunker, routing power and communications connections out of the Temporary Atmospheric Watch Observatory. In 2009, a technician will return to Summit in May to conduct minor maintenance on the seismometer. Station staff will assist the technician as needed with excavation of the bunker and maintenance activities. Year-round, science technical staff will re-level the instrument and provide as-needed assistance. In 2010, a team of two researchers will return to Summit in July. The seismometer bunker will be raised and relocated to a new site so that power and communications can continue to be connected out of the Temporary Atmospheric Watch Observatory, which is also being relocated during this time. Station staff will assist the technicians as needed with excavation of the bunker and maintenance activities. Year-round, science technical staff will re-level the instrument and provide as-needed assistance. In 2011, one researcher will return to Summit in mid-June to conduct minor maintenance on the seismometer. Summit staff will assist the researcher as needed with excavation of the bunker and maintenance activities. Year-round science technical staff will re-level the instrument and provide as-needed assistance. In 2012, two researchers will return to Summit Station in July to conduct minor maintenance on the seismometer. In 2013, two researchers will return to Summit Station in July with the following objectives: (1) relocate the seismometer to a new trench, and (2) replace the cable between the TAWO and the new seismometer trench. Summit Station staff will assist the researchers as needed with excavation of the bunker and maintenance activities. Year-round, science technical staff will re-level the instrument and provide as-needed assistance. In 2014, no researchers will deploy to Summit Station. Instead, station staff will assist with excavation of the bunker and maintenance activities as needed. Year-round, science technical staff will re-level the instrument and provide as-needed assistance. In 2015, two researchers will deploy to Summit Station in June to perform maintenance on the seismometer system, including relocating it to a new vault, raising all cables above the snow surface and checking out all hardware. Year-round, science technical staff will re-level the instrument, maintain data and power cables above the snow surface and provide as-needed assistance. No researchers will deploy in 2016. Instead, station technical staff replaced a broken seiscompbox. The replacement box is expected in fall 2016; when functioning, it will allow remote mass centering. In 2017, two researchers will visit Summit in May to perform maintenance on the seismometer system, including relocating it to a new vault, raising all cables above the snow surface, and checking out all hardware. The project team plans to install a post hole sensor for a 1-2 year comparison with the current seismic system to investigate potential replacement of the system in future years.

CPS will provide ANG travel and cargo support to/from Summit Station, Summit Station user days, a snow auger/corer with required tools, access to infrastructure, and year around science technician support for re-leveling the instrument, maintaining data and power cables above the snow surface, and general maintenance/troubleshooting as-needed). The PI will pay NSF directly for costs associated with this support. All other logistics will be provided by the PI.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2000Greenland - Summit05 / 15 / 2000 09 / 05 / 20002
2001Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 14 / 2001 1
2001Greenland - Summit07 / 17 / 2001 07 / 19 / 20011
2002Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 07 / 2002 06 / 14 / 20022
2002Greenland - Summit06 / 10 / 2002 06 / 13 / 20022
2003Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 12 / 2003 08 / 04 / 20031
2003Greenland - Summit05 / 13 / 2003 08 / 01 / 20031
2004Greenland - Summit0
2005Greenland - Summit0
2006Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 08 / 2006 05 / 11 / 20061
2006Greenland - Summit05 / 09 / 2006 05 / 11 / 20061
2007Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 01 / 2007 06 / 08 / 20072
2007Greenland - Summit06 / 04 / 2007 06 / 06 / 20072
2008Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 21 / 2008 04 / 27 / 20081
2008Greenland - Summit04 / 22 / 2008 04 / 25 / 20081
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 11 / 2009 05 / 18 / 20091
2009Greenland - Summit05 / 12 / 2009 05 / 14 / 20091
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 20 / 2010 07 / 30 / 20102
2010Greenland - Summit07 / 21 / 2010 07 / 29 / 20102
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 07 / 2011 06 / 15 / 20111
2011Greenland - Summit06 / 09 / 2011 06 / 13 / 20111
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 14 / 2012 07 / 21 / 20122
2012Greenland - Summit07 / 16 / 2012 07 / 20 / 20122
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 15 / 2013 08 / 01 / 20132
2013Greenland - Summit07 / 16 / 2013 07 / 31 / 20132
2014Greenland - Summit0
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 06 / 11 / 20152
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 03 / 2015 06 / 09 / 20152
2016Greenland - Summit0
2017Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 15 / 2017 05 / 26 / 20172
2017Greenland - Summit05 / 17 / 2017 05 / 23 / 20172
2018Greenland - Kangerlussuaq1
2018Greenland - Summit1
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) (Award# 0904152)

PI: Turner, David D (dave.turner@noaa.gov )
Phone: 0(608) 262-3822 
Institute/Department: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,  
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Erica Key (ekey@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This award supports a field campaign that will expand the Arctic Observing Network (AON) by adding cloud, atmosphere, and precipitation measurements, and associated higher-order data products, to Summit, Greenland, at the top of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The proposed instrument suite consists of a cloud radar, two microwave radiometers, an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, an X-band precipitation sensor, a ceilometer, a micropulse lidar, and a twice-daily radiosonde program. Measurements from this advanced suite of instruments, combined with some ongoing measurements at Summit, will be input for a number of algorithms to produce climatically useful geophysical data products to support GIS-specific and Arctic-wide research. Data products will include: (1) Atmospheric State - temperature and moisture profiles through the troposphere and lower stratosphere; (2) Cloud Macrophysics - cloud occurrence, vertical boundaries, and temperatures; (3) Cloud Microphysics - cloud phase, water content, optical depth, and particle size; (4) Precipitation - precipitation type and rate; and (5) Cloud Radiative Forcing - impact of clouds on the surface radiation balance. Together these products will augment similar data sets that are produced at other locations across the Arctic. It is anticipated and intended that these data sets will be widely used by the broader scientific community to understand the climates of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the broader Arctic Basin and to validate satellite retrievals and model simulations over Greenland. The "Broader Impacts" of this award are numerous. The proposed observations will contribute to the goals of the Study of Arctic Environmental Change (SEARCH). They will be the first of their kind on the Greenland Ice Sheet and will expand the existing, although modest, network of such measurements across the Arctic. Uncertainty in polar cloud properties is a major deficiency in current models of polar climate; the proposed observations of cloud macro- and micro-physics will provide some of the necessary constraints for improving model cloud algorithms. This project will provide important field work and data processing experience for graduate students at the University of Wisconsin, University of Colorado and University of Idaho. In addition, data and experiences from the field program will be integrated into undergraduate coursework at the University of Idaho and summer workshops at the University of Wisconsin.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between 0856773 (Walden, U of Idaho), 0904152 (Turner, U of WI), and 0856559 (Shupe, CU) plans an intensive cloud experiment at Summit with fieldwork from late spring 2010 through late spring 2014. A short reconnaissance trip is planned for summer 2009. Logistical details under 0856773.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2009Greenland - Summit0
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2010Greenland - Summit0
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2011Greenland - Summit0
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2012Greenland - Summit0
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2013Greenland - Summit0
 


Project Title: Site Characterization for a Greenland Neutrino Observatory (Award# ViereggNeutrino)

PI: Vieregg, Abigail Goodhue (avieregg@kicp.uchicago.edu)
Phone: 0(773) 834.2988 
Institute/Department: U of Chicago, Department of Physics 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Research/Higher Ed\H-SCfA
Program Manager: Ms. Renee Crain (rcrain@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Space Physics\Astrophysics |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://kicp.uchicago.edu/~avieregg/

Science Summary:
Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino astronomy is a rapidly evolving field that sits at the crossroads of particle physics, astronomy, and astrophysics. Neutrinos travel virtually unimpeded through the Universe, making them unique messenger particles for cosmic sources, carrying information about very distant sources that would otherwise be unavailable. Detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos could also reveal the origin of cosmic rays. Current and recent efforts to detect UHE neutrinos (the balloon-borne ANITA experiment, the ARA effort at the South Pole, and ARIANNA on the Ross Ice Shelf) have utilized radio detection techniques, searching for coherent, impulsive radio signals that are emitted as electromagnetic particle cascades are induced by neutrinos interacting with a dielectric such as ice. UHE neutrino detection requires enormous volumes of a naturally-occurring dielectric material that allows radio signals to pass through without significant attenuation. Current experimental efforts monitor enormous volumes of Antarctic ice, whose radio attenuation properties have been directly measured by us and our collaborators at multiple locations in Antarctica (Barrella et al. 2010, Besson et al. 2008, Barwick et al. 2005). ANITA searches for neutrinos interacting within all of the ice that is within its 700 km horizon while the payload is at float altitude, while ARA and ARIANNA both instrument smaller sections of ice directly on (or just below) the surface. If the neutrino detectors that are currently being developed in Antarctica are successful, the natural follow-up experiment would eventually be a similar detector installed in the Northern hemisphere to catalogue the half of the sky that is not visible from Antarctica. Determining the radio attenuation length in ice at Summit Station would be the first step toward site exploration for such a project. The researchers will perform similar measurements at Summit Station in Greenland to those that have been made in Antarctica to determine if the ice there exhibits similar low-loss properties between 200-1200 MHz and measure the radio noise environment at Summit Station. Previous radio measurements of ice properties at Summit Station have been made by geologists (Paden et al. 2005) as a by-product of measurements that characterize the rock interface at the bottom of the ice sheet, and hint at very long attenuation lengths ( > 500 m), rivaling those measured in the Antarctic.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers will conduct an experiment to determine the radio attenuation length in ice at Summit Station, to understand if the site exhibits similar low-loss properties as have been observed in Antarctica. Such characteristics are important for the detection of neutrinos, and if the neutrino detectors that are currently being developed in Antarctica are successful, Summit Station may be a suitable location for a similar detector installed in the Northern hemisphere to catalogue the half of the sky that is not visible from Antarctica. During the 2013 field season, a team of four will conduct a site characterization visit to Summit Station to directly measure the radio attenuation length and birefringence of the ice as well as make measurements of the radio noise environment at the site. Previous radio measurements of ice properties at Summit Station have been made by geologists as a by-product of characterization of the rock interface at the bottom of the ice sheet, and hint at very long attenuation lengths ( > 500 m), rivaling those measured in the Antarctic. Researchers will perform a direct measurement of ice properties to compare with measurements made in Antarctica using the same techniques. In June 2015, researchers will return to Summit Station in staggered teams of two to test a phased array of radio antennas in situ. They will establish a day-camp at the DISC borehole to deploy the array in different configurations while transmitting calibration signals from various surface locations. They will temporarily pump drill fluid out of the borehole while doing their tests. Fluid will either be pumped down the borehole after the group is finished or will be retro-ed if CPS determines a cost-effective method. The group will bring their own pump and associated PPE, utilizing containment provided onsite. CPS staff will assist with site set-up and to ensure the pump mates with the provided generator. The group will commute daily to the DISC borehole by foot and will occasionally access the Summit snowmobiles and sleds for days requiring cargo transport.

CPS will provide Air National Guard (ANG) coordination for the field team and cargo; reservations for KISS user days in Kangerlussuaq; user days at Summit Station; FEMCO assistance for site set-up; occasional use of the Summit snow machines and sled; and dedicated allocation of generators, fuel, tents, and communication/safety equipment. NSF will recoup costs associated with this support directly from the PI’s institute. The PIs will make all other arrangements and pay for them through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20134
2013Greenland - Summit05 / 31 / 2013 06 / 06 / 20134
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 07 / 01 / 20154
2015Greenland - Summit06 / 01 / 2015 06 / 29 / 20154
 


Project Title: IGERT: Polar Environmental Change (Award# 0801490)

PI: Virginia, Ross Arthur (Ross.A.Virginia@Dartmouth.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 646.0192 
Institute/Department: Dartmouth College, Institute of Arctic Studies 
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\EHR\DGE\IGERT
Program Manager: Dr. Richard Tankersley (rtankers@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach |

Project Web Site(s):
Media: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~news/releases/2008/08/06...
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) award supports the development of an interdisciplinary graduate program in polar sciences and engineering by merging expertise and facilities from Dartmouth College with the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory and institutions in Greenland. The purpose of this program is to train doctoral students to have an interdisciplinary view of polar systems and to understand the social and ethical implications of their research. Broader impacts include training and research focused on the components of polar systems that respond to and contribute to rapid environmental change, including the cryosphere (glacial ice, snow, and sea ice systems) and the biogeochemical linkages between plants, soils, and animals. The core curriculum includes an Introduction to Polar Systems and a second course on Sustainability Science, Policy and Ethics that will train students to frame research questions that will have relevance to Arctic residents and policy by using perspectives from western science and traditional ecological knowledge. Depending on their research interests, students will be trained during the Greenland Field Seminar in either terrestrial ecosystem or cryosphere dynamics, followed by instruction in the human dimensions of Arctic change in Nuuk, the site of the University of Greenland and the Inuit Circumpolar Council. IGERT students will receive continuing interdisciplinary training through a seminar series and other related events on polar science and policy organized with the Dickey Center Institute of Arctic Studies, a workshop on preparing grant proposals, an annual program evaluation and research symposium, cross-IGERT activities, and opportunities for specialized training at other institutions or field sites. A special effort will be made to engage with Native American students. IGERT is an NSF-wide program intended to meet the challenges of educating U.S. Ph.D. scientists and engineers with the interdisciplinary background, deep knowledge in a chosen discipline, and the technical, professional, and personal skills needed for the career demands of the future. The program is intended to catalyze a cultural change in graduate education by establishing innovative new models for graduate education and training in a fertile environment for collaborative research that transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Logistics Summary:
This grant supports a graduate program with a field course designed to offer students hands-on research opportunities. Beginning in 2010, up to 12 students and instructors will travel to Greenland each year for coursework. In 2009, students will complete core introductory courses during the 2009-10 academic year before taking the Greenland course. Six members will travel to Greenland during summer 2009 for planning purposes and will work on curriculum development with Greenlandic colleagues. They plan to spend a few days in Kangerlussuaq and time in Nuuk to meet with faculty at the University and with researchers at the ICC. During the summers of 2010 through 2014, the field course will be carried out with two distinct parts: a two-to-three-week field study effort based from Kangerlussuaq and Summit; and a two-week exploration of policy issues--specifically the human dimensions of climate change--based from Nuuk. For the field study component, students will be grouped into two disciplines: one will focus on terrestrial studies of soil-plant-animal interactions in tundra ecosystems based from Kangerlussuaq; the other will focus on firn/ice studies based from Summit Station. For each year of field work, IGERT team members may deploy to Kangerlussuaq to begin experiments in advance of the field team's arrival. In addition, IGERT students may engage in additional research activities. In 2013, these activities include early season research activities for one student at Summit and four students at Kangerlussuaq. Additionally, a subset of the main field team will visit Ilulissat in 2013 to study and see the rapidly advancing outlet glacier at Ilulissat, and investigate topics related to ecotourism and its environmental and cultural impacts. The 2014 field season will be broken up into three separate segments. Early season Kanger work will consist of three research students and a PolarTREC teacher, Emily Dodson (1345146ED), in June. The mid-season work will include an eight person team that will split into three different field groups in July. During this period two participants will take a short trip to Nuuk while one participant will visit Summit to overlap with the JSEP group. The late season work based out of Kanger will have two participants from late July to August. In 2015, a team of 6 will return to Kangerlussuaq to continue studies/sampling. Based from the KISS, they will make day trips to or camp at sampling sites.

For all years of the grant, CPS will arrange Air National Guard (ANG) flights to and from Kangerlussuaq, field and communications gear, user days and classroom space at the KISS facility, and Kangerlussuaq vehicle rentals. From 2010 – 2014, CPS will pay for all costs associated with this support; in 2015, the PI will pay for lodging and vehicle rentals. In addition, from 2010 to 2014, CPS will provide commercial airline tickets to/from Nuuk and/or Ilulissat, ANG arrangements to/from Summit, and Summit user days. ANG flights are scheduled in advance; if the timing of flights is not suitable, the PI will be responsible for commercial airline tickets. The research team will make all other arrangements and pay for them via the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 27 / 2009 08 / 06 / 20096
2009Greenland - Nuuk07 / 28 / 2009 08 / 05 / 20092
2009Greenland - Summit07 / 29 / 2009 08 / 04 / 20096
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 10 / 2010 08 / 22 / 201012
2010Greenland - Nuuk08 / 09 / 2010 08 / 20 / 20108
2010Greenland - Summit07 / 23 / 2010 07 / 29 / 20108
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 18 / 2011 08 / 17 / 201116
2011Greenland - Nuuk08 / 04 / 2011 08 / 30 / 20118
2011Greenland - Summit07 / 19 / 2011 07 / 23 / 20119
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 07 / 2012 08 / 22 / 201216
2012Greenland - NEEM07 / 18 / 2012 07 / 20 / 20121
2012Greenland - Nuuk08 / 04 / 2012 08 / 18 / 20126
2012Greenland - Summit07 / 13 / 2012 07 / 23 / 20129
2013Greenland - Ilulissat08 / 11 / 2013 08 / 14 / 20138
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 03 / 2013 08 / 21 / 201314
2013Greenland - Nuuk08 / 02 / 2013 08 / 11 / 20139
2013Greenland - Summit06 / 04 / 2013 07 / 16 / 20135
2014Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 09 / 2014 08 / 22 / 201411
2014Greenland - Nuuk06 / 30 / 2014 07 / 02 / 20141
2014Greenland - Summit07 / 11 / 2014 07 / 20 / 20141
2015Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 29 / 2015 08 / 08 / 20156
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) (Award# 0856773)

PI: Walden, Von P (v.walden@wsu.edu)
Phone: 0(509) 335.5645  
Institute/Department: Washington State University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  
IPY Project? NO
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Erica Key (ekey@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate\Atmospheric Radiation | Meteorology and Climate\Cloud Physics |

Project Web Site(s):
Blog: http://polarfield.com/blog/moving-mobile-science-f...
Project: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/arctic/observatories/...
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This award supports a field campaign that will expand the Arctic Observing Network (AON) by adding cloud, atmosphere, and precipitation measurements, and associated higher-order data products, to Summit, Greenland, at the top of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The proposed instrument suite consists of a cloud radar, two microwave radiometers, an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, an X-band precipitation sensor, a ceilometer, a micropulse lidar, and a twice-daily radiosonde program. Measurements from this advanced suite of instruments, combined with some ongoing measurements at Summit, will be input for a number of algorithms to produce climatically useful geophysical data products to support GIS-specific and Arctic-wide research. Data products will include: (1) Atmospheric State - temperature and moisture profiles through the troposphere and lower stratosphere; (2) Cloud Macrophysics - cloud occurrence, vertical boundaries, and temperatures; (3) Cloud Microphysics - cloud phase, water content, optical depth, and particle size; (4) Precipitation - precipitation type and rate; and (5) Cloud Radiative Forcing - impact of clouds on the surface radiation balance. Together these products will augment similar data sets that are produced at other locations across the Arctic. It is anticipated and intended that these data sets will be widely used by the broader scientific community to understand the climates of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the broader Arctic Basin and to validate satellite retrievals and model simulations over Greenland. The "Broader Impacts" of this award are numerous. The proposed observations will contribute to the goals of the Study of Arctic Environmental Change (SEARCH). They will be the first of their kind on the Greenland Ice Sheet and will expand the existing, although modest, network of such measurements across the Arctic. Uncertainty in polar cloud properties is a major deficiency in current models of polar climate; the proposed observations of cloud macro- and micro-physics will provide some of the necessary constraints for improving model cloud algorithms. This project will provide important field work and data processing experience for graduate students at the University of Wisconsin, University of Colorado and University of Idaho. In addition, data and experiences from the field program will be integrated into undergraduate coursework at the University of Idaho and summer workshops at the University of Wisconsin.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaboration between Walden (0856773, U of Idaho), Turner (0904152, U of WI), and Shupe (0856559, CU) will carry out an intensive cloud experiment at Summit with fieldwork from late spring 2010 through late spring 2013. After installing instruments at Summit and initiating the experiments, the researchers will maintain a technician at the station year-round. This technician will monitor project instruments and complete an intensive balloon launch campaign with the assistance of on-site Summit technicians. During 2009 a field team of two will conduct a short reconnaissance trip. In May 2010, a field team of six will deploy to Summit and install a suite of instruments, to be maintained for the duration of the 2010 summer and the 2010-2011 winter by a dedicated science technician. In addition to the core ICECAPS experiments, a LiDAR and Sodar will be added to complement the existing suite of instruments. During 2011 the field team will visit Summit for routine maintenance and to minimize instrument down time during the annual Mobile Science Facility move. The deployments will be split into three different periods with an early season deployment for one researcher mid-April through early May, a short (~4 day) deployment for two researchers mid/late-May, and another short deployment (~4 days) mid-June. The ICECAPS project will continue to support one year-round science technician, who will follow the same seasonal staffing cylcle as the CPS crew (with exception of the summer ICECAPS technician, who will turn over mid season) and comply with all CPS safety and program requirements. For the 2012 field season, the deployments will be split into two different periods with an early season deployment for two researchers late April and a deployment for one researcher mid/late-May. Additional deployments may be necessary if further instrument maintenance is required. The ICECAPS project will continue to support one year-round science technician. The ICECAPS technicians will continue to follow the same seasonal staffing cycle as the CPS crew (with exception of the summer ICECAPS technician, who will turn over mid-season) and comply with all CPS safety and program requirements. Logistical details will be carried under 0856773. Future work for this project can be found under NSF grant 1414314.

CPS will provide ANG coordination for the field team and cargo; coordination and space for one passenger on winter air charters; in-transit user days in Kangerlussuaq; access to the Summit Station infrastructure and services, including construction support for relocating and maintaining the Mobile Science Facility; helium provision, shipment, and staging; early season and late season liquid nitrogen provision and shipment; and science technical services. The PIs will make all other arrangements and pay for them through the grant. NOTE: Support details are contingent on continued funding for the project. If funding is awarded, the scope of CPS support will be adjusted beginning in August 2013 to include provision of radiosondes, balloons, and parachutes for twice daily launches; and staffing of a project specific year-round science technician to support the project.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq07 / 27 / 2009 08 / 06 / 20092
2009Greenland - Summit07 / 29 / 2009 08 / 04 / 20092
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 23 / 2010 12 / 31 / 201010
2010Greenland - Summit05 / 14 / 2010 12 / 31 / 201010
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq02 / 03 / 2011 11 / 08 / 201111
2011Greenland - Summit01 / 01 / 2011 12 / 31 / 201111
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 20 / 2012 08 / 17 / 20128
2012Greenland - Summit02 / 03 / 2012 12 / 31 / 201211
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq04 / 19 / 2013 08 / 21 / 20136
2013Greenland - Summit04 / 24 / 2013 08 / 19 / 20136
 


Generated from:
 
Parameters used to generate this report:Region = "Greenland", Location = "Summit", Season = "2013", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 33
 
ARLSS_ProjectsDetail