Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Moved by the State: Perspectives on Relocation and Resettlement in the Circumpolar North (Award# 0713896)

PI: Schweitzer, Peter P. (ppschweitzer@alaska.edu)
Phone: (907) 474.5015 
Institute/Department: U of Alaska, Fairbanks, Department of Anthropology 
IPY Project? YES
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ASSP\BOREAS
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Social and Human Sciences\Anthropology |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumbe...
Project: http://www.alaska.edu/move/

Science Summary:
This study of relocation and resettlement will document the diverse relocation phenomena which have characterized Alaska and rural Chukotka, Russia throughout the 20th century and into the 21st. The project will focus on four or more case studies providing in-depth documentation resulting in a better understanding of the factors which contribute to positive and negative effects of relocation events. This addresses important issues regarding the creation and re-creation of community identity and the importance of “place” in these processes. This particular project, as part of the larger Moved by the State: Perspectives on Relocation and Resettlement in the Circumpolar North (MOVE) project, will concentrate on small-scale indigenous communities in Chukotka, while covering indigenous and non-indigenous communities in Alaska. The goal is to highlight similarities and differences within Alaska and Chukotka, as well as between these regions. In rural Chukotka, it is expected that one case study will address the traumatic “village closures” of the late 1950s, as experienced by Chaplino, Naukan, and a number of smaller communities. A second Chukotkan case study is intended to focus on less well-known processes of gradual incorporation, which affected most coastal communities of the Chukchi Peninsula. In Alaska we will focus on future indigenous resettlements, forced in part by increased erosion and flooding linked to climate change, that are just now in planning stages with state and federal governments. We focus particularly on the villages of Shishmaref, and possibly Golovin, Alaska. Included in this research will be an historical analysis of the consolidation of villages during the late 19th and early 20th century. To best understand these processes of relocation over time and into the future, ethnographic research has, to date, been conducted in the villages of Shishmaref, Koyukuk, and in meetings and planning sessions in Anchorage, Alaska.

Logistics Summary:
This project is part of the large, European Science Foundation-led BOREAS coordinated program of research in the North that includes scientists from Europe, the US, Canada, and Russia. In particular, this grant contributes to Moved by the State: Perspectives on Relocation and Resettlement in the Circumpolar North (MOVE). PI Schweitzer is also the project lead for MOVE. For this study of relocation and resettlement of indigenous and non-indigenous communities, studies will center on Chukotkan communities in Russia and three communities in Alaska. The first year of the grant will focus on background work. Researchers will travel to each site in Chukota and Alaska once per year in the second and third years. One post-doctoral fellow will conduct the Chukota fieldwork while 1 or 2 students will conduct the Alaskan work. In 2008, one researcher will work on the Chukchi Peninsula in the summer/fall. He will observe and interview community members in contemporary settlements and hunting camps, and map abandoned settlements along the east coast of Chukotka from Provideniya to Lavrentiya, visiting Provideniya, Unazik, Novoe Chaplino, Lorino, Akkani, Lavrentiya, Pinakul, Nuniamo and a range of smaller abandoned historic coastal settlements. In 2009, previous fieldwork (see above) on the Chukchi Peninsula will be expanded to field sites northwards from Lavrentiya, around East Cape (including Naukan), towards Uelen and Inchoun along the Arctic coast. In addition, one researcher will visit Shishmaref, Anchorage, and possibly Juneau. Another will visit Kaktovik in May. In 2010 one team member will travel to Shishmaref, Alaska. In 2011 one field team member returned to Chukotka.

CPS will support the 2009 & 2011 Russian fieldwork via a subcontract with CSSG. The PI will pay for all other travel and consultant fees associated with this project through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2008Alaska - Anchorage1
2008Alaska - Shishmaref1
2008Russia - Akani08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2008Russia - Chukotka08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2008Russia - Lavrentiya08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2008Russia - Lorino08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2008Russia - New Chaplino1
2008Russia - Pinakul08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2008Russia - Provideniya08 / 08 / 2008 10 / 01 / 20081
2009Alaska - Anchorage1
2009Alaska - Kaktovik05 / 15 / 2009 06 / 01 / 20091
2009Alaska - Shishmaref1
2009Russia - Anadyr09 / 29 / 2009 10 / 05 / 20091
2009Russia - Chukotka08 / 16 / 2009 10 / 05 / 20091
2009Russia - Inchoun08 / 28 / 2009 09 / 04 / 20091
2009Russia - Lavrentiya08 / 22 / 2009 09 / 29 / 20091
2009Russia - Provideniya08 / 16 / 2009 08 / 21 / 20091
2009Russia - Uelen09 / 04 / 2009 09 / 27 / 20091
2009Russia - Yanrakynnot08 / 21 / 2009 08 / 22 / 20091
2010Alaska - Shishmaref05 / 01 / 2010 05 / 26 / 20101
2011Russia - Lorino06 / 01 / 2011 07 / 15 / 20111
2011Russia - Sireniki0
 


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