Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Does competition for nitrogen between autotrophs and heterotrophs control carbon fluxes in the western coastal Arctic? (Award# 0910252)

PI: Yager, Patricia L (pyager@uga.edu)
Phone: (706) 542.6824 
Institute/Department: U of Georgia, School of Marine Programs 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Biology\Biogeochemistry | Biology\Genomics | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://ArcticNitro.org
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). Scientists on this collaboration will investigate the microbial controls on the productivity of a coastal Arctic ecosystem by focusing on the competition between autotrophs and heterotrophs for nitrogen (N). In the winter, spring and summer waters near Barrow, Alaska, supplemented with complementary international research opportunities, the PIs will measure in situ concentrations of key microbial and biogeochemical constituents, relevant uptake activities, and expression of key N cycling genes to address two hypotheses: 1. The balance of autotrophy and heterotrophy in the Arctic is regulated both temporally and spatially by nitrate and light. 2. Microbial community structure will vary according to the seasonal light cycle and the sources of available N. The observed lag in bacterial response to phytoplankton growth is due to a community shift.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative research involves grants 0910252 (Yager, UGA, LEAD) 0909647 (Frischer, Skidaway); and 0909839 (Bronk, VIMS). The researchers will study the near-shore marine food web, specifically the nitrogen cycle and how it is partitioned between microbial autotrophs and heterotrophs. For this project, researchers will visit Barrow Alaska, three times a year (2010-12) for water-sampling campaigns at a location 1.5 miles offshore from Barrow, one each during the light (spring, summer) and dark periods. In addition to the research, the PI will conduct two outreach visits: she will spend about 3 days in Barrow prior to commencement of fieldwork to present the project to the community; a presentation to the community prior to commencement of fieldwork, participation in the Schoolyard Saturday series and a monitoring legacy in the community during Year 2. For the research, teams will lodge in Barrow and make day trips to their sampling sites, either by boat when the sea ice is out, or via snowmachine over the ice during the colder months. For the latter case, they will gain access to water by drilling holes in the ice at the site that was identified in 2010. They will take extensive water samples for analysis in the lab at Barrow for chemical composition, bacterial abundance, production, respiration, nitrogen uptake and growth and other measurements. The team will make measurements of primary productivity and nitrogen uptake using non-radioactive 13C labeled bicarbonate and non-radioactive 15N, as well as bacterial production (using 3H) and carbon utilization (using 14C) in laboratory incubations). In January 2011, a team of about 10 researchers will travel to Barrow, arriving there in late January. Based from Barrow, they will make 3-4 day-trips via snowmachine and sled, weather permitting, to their sea-ice field sites to collect water samples. An on-ice tent camp will be established for shelter and sample work. A bear guard will remain with the team in the field, and other personnel will assist the team with daily experiment set-up/take-down, hole-drilling, and transport to and from the site as needed. Back in the Barrow labs, the researchers will process samples more extensively. The researchers will depart Barrow at the beginning of February. In late April 2011, the team will return to Barrow for about 10 days to revisit the two field sites from January 2011 and the 2010 season. The fieldwork and labwork will be similar to January 2011. In addition, they will take a few ice cores with a corer they will bring up to Barrow and analyze them in a cold room. In late July or August, the team will return to collect water samples from a boat. In 2011, PolarTREC teacher, Dolores Garay (0956825DG), will join the team in Barrow during January and April expeditions. An artist, Adriane Colburn will also join the team in April 2011. In January 2012, a team of about 9 researchers will visit Barrow and will make 3 one-day trips via snowmachine and sled to a different sea-ice field site than was visited in 2011 to collect water samples. An on-ice tent camp will be established for shelter and sample work. A bear guard will remain with the team in the field, and other personnel will assist the team with daily experiment set-up/take-down, hole-drilling, and transport to and from the site as needed. Back in the Barrow labs, the researchers will process samples more extensively. The researchers will depart Barrow at the end of January. In 2015, the PI will visit Barrow for an outreach component of the project.

CPS will provide Barrow infrastructure and services including: lodging, appropriate labs, bench and office spaces; vehicles including trucks, boats, snowmachines and sleds; bear guards and/or boat operators; permitting assistance; and field and safety equipment. In 2015 CPS will provide travel and per diem for 2 researchers, lodging and truck rental in Barrow.The PIs will arrange and pay for all other logistics through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2010Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)02 / 26 / 2010 09 / 01 / 20108
2011Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)01 / 23 / 2011 08 / 25 / 20119
2012Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)01 / 14 / 2012 01 / 25 / 20129
2015Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)02 / 14 / 2015 02 / 18 / 20152
 


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Parameters used to generate this report:, Grant# = "0910252", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 1
 
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