Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Dynamics of subglacial erosion of soft sediments and its consequences for glacier evolution (Award# 1304899)

PI: Truffer, Martin (truffer@gi.alaska.edu)
Phone: (907) 474.5359 
Institute/Department: U of Alaska, Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. William Wiseman (wwiseman@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences\Glaciology |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://data.iarc.uaf.edu
Data: http://nsidc.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=13...
Data: http://www.unavco.org
Data: http://www.wgms.ch

Science Summary:
This grant addresses the feedbacks between glacier erosion and glacier dynamics. It does so by measuring the spatial and temporal patterns of sediment erosion, properties of basal till, basal water pressure, basal motion, ice deformation, surface velocities, surface mass balance, and changes in surface elevation and terminus position. This will be accomplished through a comprehensive observational program using radio echo sounding, reflection seismics, borehole observations, GPS, satellite remote sensing, and airborne LiDAR and digital photogrammetry. All observations will be interpreted with the help of numerical models that explore the effects of changing boundary conditions and the longer term evolution, taking into account the effects of sediment excavation. The work will be carried out at Taku Glacier, Southeast Alaska where all relevant processes are currently active. This project will impact model studies on glacier and ice sheet evolution, as well as interpretations of sedimentary records from past glaciations. This project will be closely coordinated with activities of the Juneau Icefield Research Program, an annual educational program for high school and college students on the Juneau Icefield.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers on this collaborative project between Truffer (1304899, UAF, LEAD) and Amundson (1303895, U of Alaska, Juneau) address the feedback between glacier erosion and glacier dynamics. They do so by measuring the spatial and temporal patterns of sediment erosion, properties of basal till, basal water pressure, basal motion, ice deformation, surface velocities, surface mass balance, and changes in surface elevation and terminus position. These activities will be accomplished through a three-year comprehensive observational program using radio echo sounding, reflection seismics, borehole observations, GPS, satellite remote sensing, and airborne LiDAR and digital photogrammetry. Beginning in 2014 and through 2016, researchers will access the Taku Glacier via helicopter three times each year. In 2014 and 2016 the major field effort concerns the collection of active seismic data. In 2015, researchers will concentrate on borehole drilling and instrumentation. Field visits include up to 8 people for periods of up to 2 weeks, with one longer visit and two shorter trips each season. This project will be closely coordinated with activities of the Juneau Icefield Research Program, an annual educational program for high school and college students on the Juneau Icefield. Students will have the opportunity to interact with the investigators directly by helping with the field program.

CPS will provide transportation to/from the glacier, camping equipment, freight, communication and safety equipment. All other logistics, including any necessary permits, will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Alaska - Taku Glacier03 / 24 / 2014 09 / 17 / 201410
2015Alaska - Taku Glacier03 / 27 / 2015 10 / 02 / 201513
2016Alaska - Taku Glacier03 / 12 / 2016 10 / 01 / 20169
 


Generated from:
 
Parameters used to generate this report:, Grant# = "1304899", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 1
 
ARLSS_ProjectsDetail