Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Eurasian and Makarov basins observational network targets changes in the Arctic Ocean (Award# 1203146)

PI: Alkire, Matthew (malkire@apl.washington.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 897.1693 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://nabos.iarc.uaf.edu/data/registered/main.php
NSF_Award_Info: http://nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=120314...

Science Summary:
Responding to urgent needs for a long-term multidisciplinary observation system for understanding rapid high-latitude climate change in the Arctic Ocean, a Eurasian and Makarov Basin (EMB) observational network will be created as an element of the Arctic Observing Network (AON). Three August-September cruises, one every two years, will be conducted, with extensive measurements along continental margins, a boundary current conduit; cruises will cover vast areas from Svalbard to the East Siberian Sea. The program ties together oceanographic, chemical, and ice observations using moorings, repeated oceanographic sections, and Lagrangian drifters to provide vital information about Arctic Ocean changes. The overarching goal of the study as an AON element is to compile a cohesive picture of the state and transformations of Atlantic Water (AW) in the EMB, with particular focus on three major observational targets: (1) along-slope AW transport by the boundary currents; (2) interaction of AW branches with shelf waters, deep basin interior and upper ocean; and (3) EMB indications of changes in the upper ocean circulation. The proposed targets are broad in scope and pose a wide range of challenges to modern high-latitude observational oceanography. The EMB's size and location mean that this part of the Arctic Ocean is representative of pan-arctic conditions and processes, and therefore appropriate for long-term observing. Therefore, the project is an important element of the AON. Graduate students will be supported; female and Alaska Native students will be encouraged to participate. Program outreach will culminate in 2013 with a shipboard summer school. Data and products, critically-needed benchmarks for Arctic satellite sea-ice and altimeter measurements, will be available per AON data policy.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Polyakov (1203473, UAF) and Alkire (1203146, APL) aims to compile a cohesive picture of the climatic changes in the Eurasian and Makarov basins (EMB) of the Arctic Ocean, with particular focus on understanding three major observational targets: Along-slope AW transport by the boundary currents, Interaction of AW branches with shelf waters, deep basin interior and upper ocean, and EMB indications of changes in the upper ocean circulation. This project will also continue vital boundary current observations that have been maintained since 2002 as a part of the Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System (NABOS) program. Observations will be coordinated with other AON elements like the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO), the International Arctic Buoy Program (IABP), and the international Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) Program. Logistic details under 1203473.

CPS will provide a satellite phone in 2015 and 2017. All logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin0
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin0
2015Alaska - Fairbanks0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin0
2016Alaska - Fairbanks0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Importance of Shelf Break Upwelling to Upper Trophic Level Ecology in the Western Beaufort Sea (Award# 1603941)

PI: Ashjian, Carin (cashjian@whoi.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 289.3457 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Biology 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
The edge of the shallow continental shelf (called the 'shelf break') in the Beaufort Sea is vulnerable both to direct impacts of ongoing climate change and to indirect impacts that may result from increased human activity in response to new opportunities associated with ocean warming and sea ice reduction. Beaufort Sea shelf break upwelling may be increasing in frequency in response to recent large-scale atmospheric changes, potentially increasing the importance of the shelf-break environment for a range of upper trophic level animals. This grant will support research to increase our understanding of the importance of the region to upper trophic levels such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals, provide a mechanistic understanding of the linked atmosphere-ocean- plankton-predator system, and predict future consequences and impacts of environmental change on this system. A substantial communications program built upon long-standing, well-established relationships between the researchers and Alaska North Slope communities and subsistence organizations is planned both to coordinate the planned sampling and to convey the results of the research back to the communities. Information will be disseminated locally before and during two research cruises using a range of media including daily email reports, Facebook pages, blogs, interviews on local radio stations, and flyers. A comprehensive project report, a summary report written in straightforward English, and a poster describing results will be disseminated to the North Slope communities. Project members will also present results of the research in local lecture series or to interested local organizations. Involvement of a K-12 teacher in at least one of the cruises is planned. Both cruises will have the participation of a local community observer who will communicate directly with local communities during the cruise and share local knowledge with the science party. The Beaufort Sea shelf break experiences frequent upwelling of deep, nutrient rich basin water onto the shelf. Such upwelling is not only a short-term source of heat, salt, and nutrients, and a mechanism promoting elevated primary production (production response), but it also transports populations between ocean regions and depth strata or regimes (physical response), potentially modifying ecosystem structure and availability of zooplankton and fish prey to upper trophic level consumers. The Beaufort Sea shelf break is a domain of enhanced abundance of upper trophic level animals, presumably in response to elevated availability of their prey. Here researchers will explore and identify the mechanisms linking broad-scale atmospheric forcing, ocean physical response, prey-base condition and distribution, upper trophic level animal aggregations, and climate change along the Beaufort Shelf break. The project's overarching hypothesis is that atmospherically-forced (wind-induced) upwelling along this shelf break leads to enhanced feeding opportunities for intermediate links in the pelagic ecosystem (zooplankton, forage fish) that in turn sustain the exploitation of this environment by animals such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals. This hypothesis will be addressed using a combination of ship-based fieldwork, long-term moorings equipped with physical and biological sensors, and syntheses of retrospective and projected model output and longer-term data. The distributions, abundances, condition, and biology of multiple trophic levels will be described within the context of the dynamics of the physical environment to expand our understanding of trophic linkages and the importance of shelf-break upwelling to that system. Physical and biological model output and retrospective data will be synthesized with the mechanistic understanding gained during the field program to retrospectively characterize wind-driven upper trophic level ecosystem variability and predict how the ecosystem may respond to future projections of these atmospheric drivers and ice-ocean conditions.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Ashjian (1603941, Lead, WHOI), Okkonen (1603120, UAF), Campbell (1603321, URI) and Stafford (1603259, UW) will focus on the Western Beaufort Sea to quantify the importance of shelf-break upwelling to upper trophic level ecology. During August – September of 2017 and 2018, researchers will perform water, plankton, and fish sampling via a 24-day research cruise to the Western Beaufort Sea. In 2017, PolarTREC teacher, Lisa Seff (1630463LS) will join the researchers on the cruise to the Beaufort Sea aboard the R/V Sikuliaq. Researchers will also conduct community outreach at a time and location to be determined.

CPS will provide a community observer for the cruise and travel funds for researchers to conduct community outreach in Alaska. All other logistics will be arranged and paid for by the PI from the research grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Nome08 / 24 / 2017 09 / 19 / 201718
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea08 / 25 / 2017 09 / 18 / 201718
2018Alaska - Nome08 / 24 / 2018 09 / 19 / 201818
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea08 / 25 / 2018 09 / 18 / 201818
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Demographic structure and recruitment patterns of the scyphozoan, Chrysaora melanaster, in the Bering Sea: the influence of climate on ecosystem function (Award# 1602488)

PI: Bi, Hongsheng (hbi@umces.edu)
Phone: 0(410) 326.7249 
Institute/Department: U of Maryland, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
In the eastern Bering Sea, jellyfish biomass increased dramatically after 1990 and peaked in 2000. Biomass increased again during the cool period of 2007-2012. Overall, moderate to cold conditions tend to favor jellyfish in this system. During times of population increase, jellyfish likely have major impacts on the Bering Sea food web, including Walleye Pollock fisheries, because the medusae directly feed on young life stages of fish and compete with fish for food. This project will estimate the age structure and age-specific abundances of the predominant jellyfish in the Bering Sea, Chrysaora melanaster, and will relate this to adult medusa abundance in order to understand how their population structure changes with time. The ultimate goal is to estimate the reproductive capacity and success of this jellyfish in relation to climate variability and to investigate the potential for increases of this jellyfish to become a recurring pattern in the Bering Sea given future climate scenarios. This project will contribute to STEM workforce development through the support for the training of a graduate student. The investigators will participate in K-12 teacher training workshops. Undergraduate students will be entrained into the research through an existing Research Experience for Undergraduates program. Elementary school students will be introduced to marine science through visits to the principal investigator's laboratory. A website for the project, including novel imagery, will be developed. Open-source code for image processing will be posted on the World Wide Web as a resource for the larger scientific community. The importance of incorporating age-specific abundances and age structure in assessments of the population dynamics of a species in relation to environmental change is well-established in fisheries science and other disciplines that attempt to understand the temporal variation of populations. Rigorous investigations will be conducted to estimate the abundance and fine-scale spatial distribution of C. melanaster including both their early planktonic and adult stages, to determine their age structure, and to construct a population model to identify recruit success and recruitment timing. This research will examine how gelatinous zooplankton populations respond to large scale environmental changes and will also facilitate understanding of the reoccurring jellyfish population increases in the Bering Sea. The sonar imaging technologies (ARIS1800) are effective in sampling adult forms of the congener C. quinquecirrha and an advanced optical ZOOplankton VISualization (ZOOVIS) system can sample small jellyfish effectively. The combination of net sampling and new aging techniques will provide much needed information on the age-structure within cohorts and will facilitate understanding of recruitment processes, e.g. single cohort versus multiple cohorts. This will in turn enable forecasting of jellyfish abundance and their predatory impacts in the Bering Sea ecosystem.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Bi (1602488, UMCES) and Decker (1601565, Yale) will estimate the age structure and age-specific abundances of the gelatinous zooplankton, Chrysaora melanaster, and relate this to adult abundance, to understand their population recruitment patterns. During the spring and summer of 2017 and 2018 a team of two researchers will participate in research cruises in the Bering Sea near the Alaska Peninsula to deploy ZOOVIS and ARIS to estimate size/age-specific abundance and collect net samples for aging medusae. In 2017 the cruise will be aboard the Sikuliaq. Also in 2017 PolarTREC teacher, Lenore Teevan (1630463LT) will join the team in the field.

All logistics for this project will be arranged and paid for by the PI from the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Sea05 / 22 / 2017 08 / 05 / 20174
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Sea05 / 22 / 2018 07 / 11 / 20183
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Importance of Shelf Break Upwelling to Upper Trophic Level Ecology in the Western Beaufort Sea (Award# 1603321)

PI: Campbell, Robert G (rgcampbell@uri.edu)
Phone: 0(401) 874.6692 
Institute/Department: U of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography Bay Campus 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
The edge of the shallow continental shelf (called the 'shelf break') in the Beaufort Sea is vulnerable both to direct impacts of ongoing climate change and to indirect impacts that may result from increased human activity in response to new opportunities associated with ocean warming and sea ice reduction. Beaufort Sea shelf break upwelling may be increasing in frequency in response to recent large-scale atmospheric changes, potentially increasing the importance of the shelf-break environment for a range of upper trophic level animals. This grant will support research to increase our understanding of the importance of the region to upper trophic levels such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals, provide a mechanistic understanding of the linked atmosphere-ocean- plankton-predator system, and predict future consequences and impacts of environmental change on this system. A substantial communications program built upon long-standing, well-established relationships between the researchers and Alaska North Slope communities and subsistence organizations is planned both to coordinate the planned sampling and to convey the results of the research back to the communities. Information will be disseminated locally before and during two research cruises using a range of media including daily email reports, Facebook pages, blogs, interviews on local radio stations, and flyers. A comprehensive project report, a summary report written in straightforward English, and a poster describing results will be disseminated to the North Slope communities. Project members will also present results of the research in local lecture series or to interested local organizations. Involvement of a K-12 teacher in at least one of the cruises is planned. Both cruises will have the participation of a local community observer who will communicate directly with local communities during the cruise and share local knowledge with the science party. The Beaufort Sea shelf break experiences frequent upwelling of deep, nutrient rich basin water onto the shelf. Such upwelling is not only a short-term source of heat, salt, and nutrients, and a mechanism promoting elevated primary production (production response), but it also transports populations between ocean regions and depth strata or regimes (physical response), potentially modifying ecosystem structure and availability of zooplankton and fish prey to upper trophic level consumers. The Beaufort Sea shelf break is a domain of enhanced abundance of upper trophic level animals, presumably in response to elevated availability of their prey. Here we will explore and identify the mechanisms linking broad-scale atmospheric forcing, ocean physical response, prey-base condition and distribution, upper trophic level animal aggregations, and climate change along the Beaufort Shelf break. Our overarching hypothesis is that atmospherically-forced (wind-induced) upwelling along this shelf break leads to enhanced feeding opportunities for intermediate links in the pelagic ecosystem (zooplankton, forage fish) that in turn sustain the exploitation of this environment by animals such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals. This hypothesis will be addressed using a combination of ship-based fieldwork, long-term moorings equipped with physical and biological sensors, and syntheses of retrospective and projected model output and longer-term data. The distributions, abundances, condition, and biology of multiple trophic levels will be described within the context of the dynamics of the physical environment to expand our understanding of trophic linkages and the importance of shelf-break upwelling to that system. Physical and biological model output and retrospective data will be synthesized with the mechanistic understanding gained during the field program to retrospectively characterize wind-driven upper trophic level ecosystem variability and predict how the ecosystem may respond to future projections of these atmospheric drivers and ice-ocean conditions.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Ashjian (1603941, Lead, WHOI), Okkonen (1603120, UAF), Campbell (1603321, URI) and Stafford (1603259, UW) will focus on the Western Beaufort Sea to quantify the importance of shelf-break upwelling to upper trophic level ecology. Logistic details under 1603941.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2018Alaska - Nome0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Demographic structure and recruitment patterns of the scyphozoan, Chrysaora melanaster, in the Bering Sea: the influence of climate on ecosystem function (Award# 1601565)

PI: Decker, Mary Beth (marybeth.decker@yale.edu)
Phone: 0(203) 432.6293 
Institute/Department: Yale University, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
In the eastern Bering Sea, jellyfish biomass increased dramatically after 1990 and peaked in 2000. Biomass increased again during the cool period of 2007-2012. Overall, moderate to cold conditions tend to favor jellyfish in this system. During times of population increase, jellyfish likely have major impacts on the Bering Sea food web, including Walleye Pollock fisheries, because the medusae directly feed on young life stages of fish and compete with fish for food. This project will estimate the age structure and age-specific abundances of the predominant jellyfish in the Bering Sea, Chrysaora melanaster, and will relate this to adult medusa abundance in order to understand how their population structure changes with time. The ultimate goal is to estimate the reproductive capacity and success of this jellyfish in relation to climate variability and to investigate the potential for increases of this jellyfish to become a recurring pattern in the Bering Sea given future climate scenarios. This project will contribute to STEM workforce development through the support for the training of a graduate student. The investigators will participate in K-12 teacher training workshops. Undergraduate students will be entrained into the research through an existing Research Experience for Undergraduates program. Elementary school students will be introduced to marine science through visits to the principal investigator's laboratory. A website for the project, including novel imagery, will be developed. Open-source code for image processing will be posted on the World Wide Web as a resource for the larger scientific community. The importance of incorporating age-specific abundances and age structure in assessments of the population dynamics of a species in relation to environmental change is well-established in fisheries science and other disciplines that attempt to understand the temporal variation of populations. Rigorous investigations will be conducted to estimate the abundance and fine-scale spatial distribution of C. melanaster including both their early planktonic and adult stages, to determine their age structure, and to construct a population model to identify recruit success and recruitment timing. This research will examine how gelatinous zooplankton populations respond to large scale environmental changes and will also facilitate understanding of the reoccurring jellyfish population increases in the Bering Sea. The sonar imaging technologies (ARIS1800) are effective in sampling adult forms of the congener C. quinquecirrha and an advanced optical ZOOplankton VISualization (ZOOVIS) system can sample small jellyfish effectively. The combination of net sampling and new aging techniques will provide much needed information on the age-structure within cohorts and will facilitate understanding of recruitment processes, e.g. single cohort versus multiple cohorts. This will in turn enable forecasting of jellyfish abundance and their predatory impacts in the Bering Sea ecosystem.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Bi (1602488, UMCES) and Decker (1601565, Yale) will estimate the age structure and age-specific abundances of the gelatinous zooplankton, Chrysaora melanaster, and relate this to adult abundance, to understand their population recruitment patterns. Logistic details under 1602488.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Sea0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Sea0
 


Project Title: An Arctic Ocean sea surface pCO2 and pH observing network (Award# 1504410)

PI: DeGrandpre, Michael (michael.degrandpre@umontana.edu)
Phone: 0(406) 243.4118 
Institute/Department: U of Montana, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography\Marine Biogeochemistry |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...
Data: http://www.socat.info/
Data: http://www.whoi.edu/itp/data/
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Global warming and other climate-related processes are rapidly changing the Arctic Ocean. Summer sea ice is disappearing and the sea surface is warming and becoming less salty. This changing physical environment is altering basic biological processes and air-sea exchange of gasses. The carbon cycle is of particular interest in the Arctic because it is unknown how carbon dioxide sources and sinks are changing and whether these changes will lead to increased greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere. It is thought that with less ice cover the Arctic Ocean will absorb more human-produced carbon dioxide. Higher carbon dioxide levels cause the ocean to become more acidic because carbon dioxide forms carbonic acid when it dissolves in water. The increase in the acidity of the water can affect the food web by harming shell-forming organisms. In spite of these important issues, not much is known about the carbon cycle in the central Arctic Ocean basins. Nearly all measurements of ocean acidity have been made on the Arctic shelves during the summer period when access is easy. We will measure the amount of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide in the surface water and its acidity in the central Arctic Ocean during cruises on the ice breaker Louis St. Laurent and on year-round oceanographic moorings. Outreach activities include continued operation of an ocean acidification exhibit that we developed for University of Montana’s science museum which has been seen by thousands of museum visitors. The research will specifically support installment of a shipboard underway pCO2 system along with deployment of pCO2, pH, and photosynthetically active radiation sensors on the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution time-series moorings in the Beaufort Sea. The ship follows the same cruise track since the program began in 2003, starting south on the Beaufort shelf and extending to the northern Canada Basin. Three moorings are deployed annually with a subsurface profiler that measures conductivity, temperature, depth, and dissolved O2. Our sensors are deployed at ~35 m depth, just below the subsurface float. These data will allow us to compute air-sea CO2 fluxes and net community productivity during periods when there is less than 100% ice cover and photosynthetically active radiation is greater than zero. The quality-controlled shipboard and mooring data will be made available to the scientific community by submission of the data to the Arctic data repository (NSF Arctic Data Center - fka ACADIA)

Logistics Summary:
This project aims to better understand the Arctic’s role in regulating greenhouse gasses by understanding the inorganic carbon cycle and how it might be altered by climate change. The project will continue two years of measurements of pCO2, pH, and dissolved O2 in the Beaufort Gyre. The PI will visit three bottom-tethered moorings locations that have been previously established within the Beaufort Gyre as part of the Beaufort Gyre Observation System (BGOS). The moorings will be visited during Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) icebreaker expeditions, most likely the CCG Ship Louis S. St-Lauren that houses the Warsilla bubbler system used for the removal of heavy pack sea ice over the mooring sites. This project will add pCO2, pH and DO sensors on the moorings, which also will have monitoring equipment from other science projects. The moorings are recovered and redeployed every year as part of the BGOS cruises. One researcher from the project will work aboard the ship in the autumn of 2016 and 2017 for the entire 30 day duration of the cruise, which is expected to leave out of Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada. In 2017 PolarTREC teacher, Dave Jones (1630463DJ) will join the team.

All logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea09 / 15 / 2016 10 / 15 / 20161
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea09 / 06 / 2017 10 / 03 / 20172
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO)-A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Region (Award# 1204044)

PI: Frey, Karen E (kfrey@clarku.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 793.7209 
Institute/Department: Clark University, Graduate School of Geography 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography\Biological, Physical and Chemical Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://pag.arcticportal.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Several regionally critical marine sites in the Pacific Arctic sector that have very high biological biomass and are focused foraging points for apex predators, have been reoccupied during multiple international cruises. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walruses and polar bears. To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are developing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels. These measurements are being made simultaneously with hydrographic surveys and satellite observations. The DBO currently focuses on five regional biological "hotspot" locations along a latitudinal gradient and includes multiple national and international occupation of these sites over the year. The spatially explicit DBO network is organized through the Pacific Arctic Group (PAG), a consensus-driven, international collaboration sanctioned by the International Arctic Science Committee. This NSF-support project is a U.S. contribution to the DBO effort in the Pacific Sector, and the scientific needs to be met are consistent with research needs identified in the 2013 US National Ocean Policy planning effort and National Strategy for the Arctic Region, and within the 2014 US Arctic Implementation Plan. This project serves as a contribution to the US-led Arctic Observing Network and is improving international cooperative efforts for evaluating ecosystem impacts from high latitude climate change. Identifying and collecting key prey-predator biological data in the context of high priority physical and chemical measurements will allow for integration of these data into scientific community analyses and ecosystem modeling efforts. Outreach to local communities and media as well as national and international groups will ensure that both local Alaskan communities and the broader public will be made aware of changes in this sensitive part of the Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This project is a collaborative study between 1204082 (Grebmeier, UMCES, LEAD), 1204044 (Frey, Clark University), and 1203906 (Pickart, WHOI). To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are implementing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels coincident with physical and chemical measurements. Scientists will participate in scientific cruises (and/or samples will be collected by scientists aboard ships transiting the study sites) from 2013 to 2017. Logistics details will be carried under Grebmeier, 1204082.

Support details will be carried under grant 1204082 (Grebmeier).
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2015Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO)-A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Region (Award# 1204082)

PI: Grebmeier, Jacqueline M (jgrebmei@cbl.umces.edu)
Phone: 0(410) 326.7334 
Institute/Department: U of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography\Biological, Physical and Chemical Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/dbo/
Project: http://pag.arcticportal.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Several regionally critical marine sites in the Pacific Arctic sector that have very high biological biomass and are focused foraging points for apex predators, have been reoccupied during multiple international cruises. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walruses and polar bears. To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are developing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels. These measurements are being made simultaneously with hydrographic surveys and satellite observations. The DBO currently focuses on five regional biological "hotspot" locations along a latitudinal gradient and includes multiple national and international occupation of these sites over the year. The spatially explicit DBO network is organized through the Pacific Arctic Group (PAG), a consensus-driven, international collaboration sanctioned by the International Arctic Science Committee. This NSF-support project is a U.S. contribution to the DBO effort in the Pacific Sector, and the scientific needs to be met are consistent with research needs identified in the 2013 US National Ocean Policy planning effort and National Strategy for the Arctic Region, and within the 2014 US Arctic Implementation Plan. This project serves as a contribution to the US-led Arctic Observing Network and is improving international cooperative efforts for evaluating ecosystem impacts from high latitude climate change. Identifying and collecting key prey-predator biological data in the context of high priority physical and chemical measurements will allow for integration of these data into scientific community analyses and ecosystem modeling efforts. Outreach to local communities and media as well as national and international groups will ensure that both local Alaskan communities and the broader public will be made aware of changes in this sensitive part of the Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This project is a collaborative study between 1204082 (Grebmeier, UMCES, LEAD), 1204044 (Frey, Clark University), and 1203906 (Pickart, WHOI). To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are implementing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels coincident with physical and chemical measurements. Scientists will participate in scientific cruises (and/or samples will be collected by scientists aboard ships transiting the study sites) from 2013 to 2017. The team is collaborating on the annual July cruise of the CCG (CCG) ship Sir Wilfred Laurier, which facilitates occupying the 5 DBO lines at the same time each year for the full suite of DBO standard measurements. The DBO includes additional cross-platform and EOL DBO data archives through the DBO network, and results from those studies will also be included in the ACADIS AON data archive as well as a collaborative workspace DBO site sponsored by the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) as a contribution to the IARPC (Interagency Arctic Research and Policy Committee) Collaborative Team efforts. For the annual cruise aboard the CCG Laurier, the Canadian Coast Guard will facilitate science on-load in Dutch Harbor, Alaska in early July of each year. Both the CCG and CPS will assist with the offload of US team members in Barrow, Alaska. In 2015, offload is scheduled for July 23. Then, a party of 15 will be transported via helicopter to Utqiagvik (Barrow), where they will be housed overnight before they travel homeward. In 2016, Utqiagvik offload is scheduled for July 21-22. Then, an international party of 16 (some of whom are funded via agencies other than NSF) will be transported off the ship via boat to the shore. CPS staff will pick up the passengers and cargo, and transport them to housing, freezer, and cargo storage spaces. After securing samples and cargo, and overnighting in Utqiagvik, the researchers will travel onward the following day. For 2017, offload in Utqiagvik (Barrow) is scheduled for 15 people on July 24 In 2017, PI Grebmeier was awarded supplement NSF #1723374 that provides direct-to-grant funds to support 15 ship days during August 2017 aboard the Norseman II as part of the 4-week Arctic Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (AMBON) research cruise. The AMBON cruise is a multi-agency supported project receiving funds from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and with this supplement the NSF.

In 2015 and 2016, CPS will provide freezer and refrigerator storage, vehicle rental, and staffing for on the ground coordination during the CCG port call in Barrow, for 15-16 people. In 2016 and 2017, CPS will also provide lodging in NSF huts for cruise participants. All other logistics will be paid by researchers from their grant funds.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 24 / 2013 07 / 25 / 201310
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 01 / 2013 08 / 01 / 20137
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 23 / 2014 09 / 09 / 201416
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 11 / 2014 07 / 23 / 201410
2015Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 23 / 2015 07 / 24 / 201511
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 04 / 2015 07 / 22 / 201511
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 21 / 2016 07 / 22 / 201616
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 01 / 2016 07 / 21 / 201616
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 24 / 2017 07 / 25 / 201715
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 03 / 2017 07 / 24 / 201715
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: A Bering Strait Ocean Observing System for the Pacific Inflow to the Arctic- a fundamental part of the Arctic (Award# 1640357)

PI: Heimbach, Patrick (heimbach@ices.utexas.edu)
Phone: 0(512) 232.7694 
Institute/Department: U of Texas, Austin, Institute for Computational Engineering and Science (ICES) 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://psc.apl.washington.edu/HLD/Bstrait/bstrait....
Data: http://www.aoos.org/aoos-data-resources/
Data: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov
Logistics: http://www.norsemanmaritime.com
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This AON project will support a comprehensive observationally-based measurement scheme for the Bering Strait, which will combine in situ observations with traditional knowledge from the Bering Strait communities and results from a 4km resolution ice-ocean model, ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean phase II). Temperature, salinity and velocity data from the Bering Strait and data products of oceanic fluxes will be measured to meet the needs of numerous scientific, climate and industrial (e.g., oil/gas exploration, shipping) studies in the region. Via a "one-stop" website (with permanent archiving at national archives), the project will provide these data and data products to all interested parties. It will develop a two-way exchange of information with native communities, drawing on results from a separately funded project (led by the native corporation Kawerak, Inc) documenting traditional knowledge of ocean currents and change in the Bering Strait region. Furthermore, bridging the traditional gap between observationalists and modelers, it will undertake a pilot study for future AON observational strategies which must surely combine observations and high quality modeling. The effort continues and expands upon decades of measurements in the Bering Strait region and constitutes an NSF contribution to the interagency Russian-American Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) partnership.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Woodgate (1304052, UW) and Heimbach (1640357, U of TX Austin) is funded by the NSF; it contributes to the various partnerships, including ONR partnerships and the U.S. – Russia Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) NOAA partnership. Researchers will continue studying to improve quantification of ocean fluxes in the Bering Strait, the gateway between the Pacific and the Arctic oceans. They will use a combination of approaches, including in-situ and remote observations (with new observations and existing data reaching back to 1990), modeling results and indigenous knowledge. Logistic details under 1304052. In 2016 the PI transferred from Massachusetts Institute of Technology to University of Texas at Austin, previous funding was under 1304050.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Alaska - Nome0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait0
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait0
2018Alaska - Nome0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait0
 


Project Title: PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (Award# 1630463DJ)

PI: Jones, David Christopher (djones@mcps.k12.mt.us)
Phone: 0(406) 728.2400 ext. 8062 
Institute/Department: Big Sky High School,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE\TREC
Program Manager: Ms. Elizabeth Rom (elrom@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach\Formal Science Education: K-12 |

Project Web Site(s):
Initiative: http://www.polartrec.com/

Science Summary:
The Artic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) will administer and implement, "Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (PolarTREC)", an international program that brings together U.S. teachers to participate in cutting-edge field research with polar scientists in various, and often remote, locations in the Arctic and Antarctica. Through hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctica, participating teachers (pre-service and in-service) will improve teaching strategies, develop resources for their careers, and change how they teach STEM in the classroom. The program goal is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing educators and polar researchers together in professional collaboration. By integrating research and education, PolarTREC will help sustain and grow the considerable scientific and public enthusiasm for polar research and education. ARCUS will support a total of twelve teachers for Arctic field seasons in 2017 and Antarctic field seasons in 2017/2018. ARCUS will recruit, select, and match teachers and researchers, maintain a website for dissemination of information about the expeditions, provide orientation training for the teachers that includes field safety and communication training, provide travel support for the teachers to meet with scientists prior to deployments and for them to join the scientific expeditions in the field, and evaluate results of the program. Dissemination efforts via the website and public presentations are expected to reach many additional teachers, students, scientists and the public.

Logistics Summary:
PolarTREC teacher, Dave Jones, will join Dr. Michael DeGrandpre's project (NSF grant 1504410) aboard the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent, in the Beaufort Sea collecting shipboard CO2 data during the cruise and deploy CO2, pH and oxygen sensors on existing moorings in collaboration with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientist Rick Krishfield. For more information refer to grant 1504410 in this database.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: Late Season Productivity, Carbon, and Nutrient Dynamics in a Changing Arctic (Award# 1504394)

PI: Juranek, Laurie W (ljuranek@coas.oregonstate.edu)
Phone: 0(541) 737.2368 
Institute/Department: Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/dbo/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...
Logistics: http://www.omao.noaa.gov/learn/marine-operations/
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Logistics: https://www.sikuliaq.alaska.edu/

Science Summary:
Satellite measurements have documented significant reductions in sea ice cover, thickness, and duration throughout the Arctic Ocean in recent decades. Because of the complex interactions and feedbacks among physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes in the Arctic, there is significant uncertainty regarding how these changes in sea ice will impact the marine biological pump, which fuels the rich bottom communities on Arctic Ocean shelves and is key to the regional carbon cycle. While responses of the biological pump to increased light availability in spring are currently being pursued, a considerable gap in knowledge exists regarding biological processes in the late summer and early fall. Recent studies indicate a several-decade trend of intensifying wind forcing over the Alaskan margin along the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas in the late, ice-free season (September-November). These events could lead to mixing of nutrients into surface waters, fueling increased biological production and sequestering additional carbon into shelf bottom waters prior to the winter ice advance. However, the lack of direct, concurrent observations of primary and net community productivity rates, and nutrient and carbon distributions during this poorly-sampled time of year hinders efforts to assess the ecosystem implications of such changes. This project proposes to address the question of increasing biological production in the late season through intensive field sampling in two successive years. The investigators will use an innovative approach to better characterize how primary productivity (PP), net community productivity (NCP), and particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon stocks (POC, DOC, DIC) are influenced by episodic nutrient inputs to the surface ocean in late summer and early fall. Over two field campaigns, they will collect high resolution surface measurements of dissolved gases, particulate and dissolved organic matter stocks and dissolved inorganic nutrients and carbon using a ship of opportunity (year 1) and dedicated research cruises (year 2). The use of geochemical rate tracers (oxygen/argon-based NCP and oxygen isotope-based PP; inventory changes of POC, DOC, nutrients, and DIC) offers a distinct advantage over incubation-based approaches by integrating processes on longer timescales (weekly to monthly). This approach is well-suited to capture the effects of episodic upwelling and subsequent ecosystem processing. On the dedicated regional research cruise in year 2 the investigators will also use a towed pumping sled to capture high-resolution vertical and cross-shelf observations. This towed sled will be equipped with standard CTD and optical sensors and interfaced to fast shipboard analyzers for measurement of nutrients and inorganic carbon (pCO2, DIC), as well as to automated samplers to collect water for oxygen/argon ratios, oxygen isotope, POC and DOC measurements. High-resolution chemical and biological distributions will be combined with ship-based ADCP measurements of water column velocities and continuity-based mass-balance calculations to constrain rates of NCP as well as the extent of vertical and lateral material fluxes. Outreach and education elements include a pilot program to engage pre-service secondary STEM teachers in educational planning and field work portions of the work. The program will provide field experience and on the job science training to teachers and result in short media outreach pieces and targeted curriculum addressing the three dimensions of science from the next generation science standards. The project will support one graduate student and several undergraduate students, who will participate in all aspects of the field and analytical work. The project will contribute to the early career development of a junior investigator.

Logistics Summary:
The objective of this project is to better characterize how Arctic Ocean primary productivity, net community productivity, and particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon stocks, are influenced by episodic nutrient inputs in the late season. In 2015 a field team of three will participate in the 29-day cruise to the Chukchi Sea and eastern Beaufort on the NOAA Ship Brown. Researchers will collect hydrographic and chemical data and sample for zooplankton on ~10 shelf transects. In February 2016 the PI will travel to Utqiagvik (Barrow) for an outreach event, and then in July 2016 the PI will travel to Anchorage for an outreach aspect of the project. During the fall of 2016 a research team of 20 will participate in a 27 day research cruise aboard the R/V Sikuliaq in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. The cruise will begin and end in Nome, AK. Researchers will return in 2017, details are TBD.

CPS will provide lodging and transportation for outreach work in Alaska, and travel costs and salary for a community observer for the cruise. All other logistics, including the cruise in 2015, will be arranged and paid for by the PI from the research grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea08 / 06 / 2015 09 / 03 / 20153
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea08 / 06 / 2015 09 / 03 / 20153
2016Alaska - Anchorage07 / 18 / 2016 07 / 20 / 20161
2016Alaska - Nome08 / 31 / 2016 09 / 30 / 201612
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)02 / 03 / 2016 02 / 05 / 20161
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea09 / 02 / 2016 10 / 03 / 201612
2017Alaska - Nome08 / 31 / 2017 09 / 30 / 201712
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea09 / 02 / 2017 10 / 03 / 201712
 


Project Title: The Arctic Observing Network at Critical Gateways--A Sustained Observing System at Davis Strait (Award# 1022472)

PI: Lee, Craig M (craig@apl.washington.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 685.7656 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Polar Science Center 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography\Chemical Oceanography | Oceanography\Instrument Development | Oceanography\Physical Oceanography | Oceanography\Sea Ice |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://iop.apl.washington.edu/projects/ds/html/ove...
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Intellectual Merit: This award supports a further five years of ocean observations in Davis Strait between the west coast of Greenland and the east coast of Baffin Island, Canada. The Davis Strait observing array is part of the NSF Arctic Observing Network (AON), which supports long-term, science-driven observing that supports research into understanding rapid environmental system change in the Arctic. AON is a component of the broader Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH). The Davis Strait observing array employs a complementary system of moorings, autonomous gliders and ship-based hydrographic surveys to quantify, with robust error estimates, water mass variability, volume, liquid freshwater, heat and ice fluxes, ambient noise and marine mammal presence at weekly to inter-annual timescales, with biennial assessment of biogeochemical properties that integrate large-scale change. Successful completion of the award will extend the Davis Strait observational record to >10 years, which will complement similar records at Bering Strait and Fram Strait, the other main gateways between the Arctic Ocean and sub-Arctic seas. Long-term observing records of >10 years duration are required to quantify the cyclic variability and secular change in fluxes connecting the Arctic Ocean and sub-Arctic seas, and understand the role played by the Arctic and sub-Arctic in steering decadal scale climate variability. Hydrophones mounted on the moored array and gliders will document the presence of marine mammals. Concurrent environmental characterization provided by moorings, gliders and hydrographic sampling will allow marine mammal variability to be assessed in the context of environmental change. Broader Impacts: The data obtained at Davis Strait are freely and openly available to the broader scientific community via a project Web site and at CADIS (Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service), the AON data repository. A female graduate student will be responsible for data processing and quality control, generation of derived products and contributing to observing system design and optimization efforts. The project continues a collaboration with the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Canada, and scientists and community members in Greenland. The Davis Strait observing array is being used as a test bed for polar ocean observing research and development and technology transfer to the broader ocean science community. In Seattle, the principal investigators will continue to participate in the Polar Science Weekend at the Pacific Science Center, Seattle, and collaborate with a high school vocational program. Whale sounds will be available to a broad audience via the Macauley Library of Natural Sounds at Cornell University.

Logistics Summary:
The researchers will use a system of complementary platforms—moorings; autonomous, extended endurance gliders (during year one and two only); and biennial hydrographic surveys—to quantify volume, freshwater, heat and ice fluxes, water mass variability, chemical properties (for documenting changes in nutrient loads, acidification and distinguishing freshwater constituents) and marine mammal populations. For each of five years beginning in 2011, researchers will travel to Nuuk, Greenland, in fall to service instruments on the mooring array. During the first two years, they also will launch gliders, which they will recover the following spring. For this work, the team will use small, chartered vessels (e.g., fishing boats). In addition, in 2011, 2013, and 2015, researchers will participate in hydrographic survey cruises aboard a global class UNOLS vessel (e.g. R/V Knorr). In 2013 NSF approved a supplement (award # 1339411) to support two more years (2014 – 2015) of continuous glider operations in Davis Strait. A single glider will repeatedly occupy the section defined by the moored array, spanning both open water and full ice cover. Deployments and recoveries would take place as part of autumn mooring service cruises, in 2013 aboard R/V Knorr, in 2014 aboard the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources vessel R/V Sanna and in 2015 aboard the new R/V Neil Armstrong. Intermediate glider servicing, typically in February and June, will take place from Sisimiut, Greenland using F/V Nanna. In September 2017 the team will participate in the R/V Sanna cruise based out of Sisimiut to recover a mooring array in the Davis Strait that was deployed as part of NSF supplement #1339411. The cruise is set to take place over a period of ~2 weeks.

In 2017 CPS will support vessel charter arrangements through the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources with the R/V Sanna, based out of Nuuk, Greenland. CPS will also coordinate payment for an air shipment from Seattle to Sisimiut as well as the return of a 40’ sea container from Sisimiut to Seattle. The PI will arrange all other logistics and pay for costs through other sources.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2011Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 15 / 2011 10 / 05 / 20118
2012Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 15 / 2012 10 / 05 / 20128
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 15 / 2013 10 / 05 / 20138
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 15 / 2014 10 / 05 / 20148
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 15 / 2015 10 / 05 / 20158
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Davis Strait09 / 09 / 2017 09 / 22 / 20172
 


Project Title: SAVI: Collaborative Research: Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic - Labrador Basin and Floats (Award# 1259103)

PI: Lozier, Susan (mslozier@duke.edu)
Phone: 0(919) 681.8199 
Institute/Department: Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OCE
Program Manager: Dr. Eric Itsweire (eitsweir@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://ilikai.soest.hawaii.edu/ladcp/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...
Project: http://www.o-snap.org/
Data: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/

Science Summary:
This project is one of two components of a US-led international program, Overturning in the Sub-polar North Atlantic (OSNAP), designed to provide a continuous record of the full-water column, trans-basin fluxes of heat, mass and freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic. The OSNAP observing system consists of two legs: one extending from southern Labrador to the southwestern tip of Greenland across the mouth of the Labrador Sea (OSNAP West), and the second from the southeastern tip of Greenland to Scotland (OSNAP East). The observing system also includes subsurface floats (OSNAP Floats) in order to trace the pathways of overflow waters in the basin and to assess the connectivity of currents crossing the OSNAP line. The location of the OSNAP East and West legs purposefully melds with a number of long-term observational efforts in the North Atlantic: the Canadian repeat hydrography program in the Labrador Sea; the German Labrador Sea western boundary array at 53°N; the global Ocean Observatories Initiative node in the southwestern Irminger Sea; the repeat hydrographic sections across the Irminger and Iceland basins; and the Ellett line in the Rockall region. Substantial international collaboration has been garnered for OSNAP, including measurement contributions from the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and Canada. Importantly, this observing system, in conjunction with the RAPID/MOCHA array at 26°N and the European Union NACLIM program measuring the Nordic Seas overflows, will provide the first comprehensive three-dimensional measure of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and provide a means to evaluate inter-gyre connectivity in the North Atlantic. This collaborative project will implement the OSNAP West section and the OSNAP Float program. The primary observational components are: (i) a mooring array across the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea, where the subpolar boundary current enters the basin. This array will complement an analogous array across the western margin at the exit point of the Labrador Sea, maintained by institutions in Germany and Canada; (ii) a sequential release of acoustically tracked floats in the lower limb of the AMOC at the OSNAP East and OSNAP West boundary arrays. These floats will be seeded in the two densest components of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) over the four-year period of the measurement program (2014-2018). This research award includes support for a Science Accross Virtual Institutes (SAVI) that is co-funded by NSF's Office of International and Integrative Activities.

Logistics Summary:
This is a collaborative US-led international program between Pickart (1259618, WHOI) and Lozier (1259103, Duke). Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic (OSNAP), is designed to provide a continuous record of the full-water column, trans-basin fluxes of heat, mass and freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic. The OSNAP observing system consists of two legs: one extending from southern Labrador to the southwestern tip of Greenland across the mouth of the Labrador Sea (OSNAP West), and the second from the southeastern tip of Greenland to Scotland (OSNAP East). OSNAP is a partner in the North Atlantic Virtual Institute (NAVIS), which connects science teams around the world studying climate variability and change in the North Atlantic. For logistics details go to 1259618.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea0
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Iceland Basin0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Reykjanes Ridge0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea0
2016Greenland - Kangerlussuaq0
2016Greenland - Nuuk0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Importance of Shelf Break Upwelling to Upper Trophic Level Ecology in the Western Beaufort Sea (Award# 1603120)

PI: Okkonen, Stephen (okkonen@alaska.net)
Phone: 0(907) 283.3234 
Institute/Department: U of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
The edge of the shallow continental shelf (called the 'shelf break') in the Beaufort Sea is vulnerable both to direct impacts of ongoing climate change and to indirect impacts that may result from increased human activity in response to new opportunities associated with ocean warming and sea ice reduction. Beaufort Sea shelf break upwelling may be increasing in frequency in response to recent large-scale atmospheric changes, potentially increasing the importance of the shelf-break environment for a range of upper trophic level animals. This grant will support research to increase our understanding of the importance of the region to upper trophic levels such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals, provide a mechanistic understanding of the linked atmosphere-ocean- plankton-predator system, and predict future consequences and impacts of environmental change on this system. A substantial communications program built upon long-standing, well-established relationships between the researchers and Alaska North Slope communities and subsistence organizations is planned both to coordinate the planned sampling and to convey the results of the research back to the communities. Information will be disseminated locally before and during two research cruises using a range of media including daily email reports, Facebook pages, blogs, interviews on local radio stations, and flyers. A comprehensive project report, a summary report written in straightforward English, and a poster describing results will be disseminated to the North Slope communities. Project members will also present results of the research in local lecture series or to interested local organizations. Involvement of a K-12 teacher in at least one of the cruises is planned. Both cruises will have the participation of a local community observer who will communicate directly with local communities during the cruise and share local knowledge with the science party. The Beaufort Sea shelf break experiences frequent upwelling of deep, nutrient rich basin water onto the shelf. Such upwelling is not only a short-term source of heat, salt, and nutrients, and a mechanism promoting elevated primary production (production response), but it also transports populations between ocean regions and depth strata or regimes (physical response), potentially modifying ecosystem structure and availability of zooplankton and fish prey to upper trophic level consumers. The Beaufort Sea shelf break is a domain of enhanced abundance of upper trophic level animals, presumably in response to elevated availability of their prey. Here we will explore and identify the mechanisms linking broad-scale atmospheric forcing, ocean physical response, prey-base condition and distribution, upper trophic level animal aggregations, and climate change along the Beaufort Shelf break. Our overarching hypothesis is that atmospherically-forced (wind-induced) upwelling along this shelf break leads to enhanced feeding opportunities for intermediate links in the pelagic ecosystem (zooplankton, forage fish) that in turn sustain the exploitation of this environment by animals such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals. This hypothesis will be addressed using a combination of ship-based fieldwork, long-term moorings equipped with physical and biological sensors, and syntheses of retrospective and projected model output and longer-term data. The distributions, abundances, condition, and biology of multiple trophic levels will be described within the context of the dynamics of the physical environment to expand our understanding of trophic linkages and the importance of shelf-break upwelling to that system. Physical and biological model output and retrospective data will be synthesized with the mechanistic understanding gained during the field program to retrospectively characterize wind-driven upper trophic level ecosystem variability and predict how the ecosystem may respond to future projections of these atmospheric drivers and ice-ocean conditions.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Ashjian (1603941, Lead, WHOI), Okkonen (1603120, UAF), Campbell (1603321, URI) and Stafford (1603259, UW) will focus on the Western Beaufort Sea to quantify the importance of shelf-break upwelling to upper trophic level ecology. Logistic details under 1603941.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2018Alaska - Nome0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO)-A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Region (Award# 1203906)

PI: Pickart, Robert S (rpickart@whoi.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 289.2858 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography Dept. 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography\Biological, Physical and Chemical Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://pag.arcticportal.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Several regionally critical marine sites in the Pacific Arctic sector that have very high biological biomass and are focused foraging points for apex predators, have been reoccupied during multiple international cruises. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walruses and polar bears. To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are developing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels. These measurements are being made simultaneously with hydrographic surveys and satellite observations. The DBO currently focuses on five regional biological "hotspot" locations along a latitudinal gradient and includes multiple national and international occupation of these sites over the year. The spatially explicit DBO network is organized through the Pacific Arctic Group (PAG), a consensus-driven, international collaboration sanctioned by the International Arctic Science Committee. This NSF-support project is a U.S. contribution to the DBO effort in the Pacific Sector, and the scientific needs to be met are consistent with research needs identified in the 2013 US National Ocean Policy planning effort and National Strategy for the Arctic Region, and within the 2014 US Arctic Implementation Plan. This project serves as a contribution to the US-led Arctic Observing Network and is improving international cooperative efforts for evaluating ecosystem impacts from high latitude climate change. Identifying and collecting key prey-predator biological data in the context of high priority physical and chemical measurements will allow for integration of these data into scientific community analyses and ecosystem modeling efforts. Outreach to local communities and media as well as national and international groups will ensure that both local Alaskan communities and the broader public will be made aware of changes in this sensitive part of the Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This project is a collaborative study between 1204082 (Grebmeier, UMCES, LEAD), 1204044 (Frey, Clark University), and 1203906 (Pickart, WHOI). To more systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change, an international consortium of scientists are implementing a coordinated Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) that includes selected biological measurements at multiple trophic levels coincident with physical and chemical measurements. Scientists will participate in scientific cruises (and/or samples will be collected by scientists aboard ships transiting the study sites) from 2013 to 2017. Logistics details will be carried under Grebmeier, 1204082.

Support details will be carried under grant 1204082 (Grebmeier) in this database.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2014Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2015Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea0
 


Project Title: SAVI: Collaborative Research: Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic - Labrador Basin and Floats (Award# 1259618)

PI: Pickart, Robert S (rpickart@whoi.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 289.2858 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Physical Oceanography Dept. 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OCE
Program Manager: Dr. Eric Itsweire (eitsweir@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://ilikai.soest.hawaii.edu/ladcp/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...
Project: http://www.o-snap.org/
Data: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/

Science Summary:
This project is one of two components of a US-led international program, Overturning in the Sub-polar North Atlantic (OSNAP), designed to provide a continuous record of the full-water column, trans-basin fluxes of heat, mass and freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic. The OSNAP observing system consists of two legs: one extending from southern Labrador to the southwestern tip of Greenland across the mouth of the Labrador Sea (OSNAP West), and the second from the southeastern tip of Greenland to Scotland (OSNAP East). The observing system also includes subsurface floats (OSNAP Floats) in order to trace the pathways of overflow waters in the basin and to assess the connectivity of currents crossing the OSNAP line. The location of the OSNAP East and West legs purposefully melds with a number of long-term observational efforts in the North Atlantic: the Canadian repeat hydrography program in the Labrador Sea; the German Labrador Sea western boundary array at 53°N; the global Ocean Observatories Initiative node in the southwestern Irminger Sea; the repeat hydrographic sections across the Irminger and Iceland basins; and the Ellett line in the Rockall region. Substantial international collaboration has been garnered for OSNAP, including measurement contributions from the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and Canada. Importantly, this observing system, in conjunction with the RAPID/MOCHA array at 26°N and the European Union NACLIM program measuring the Nordic Seas overflows, will provide the first comprehensive three-dimensional measure of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and provide a means to evaluate inter-gyre connectivity in the North Atlantic. This collaborative project will implement the OSNAP West section and the OSNAP Float program. The primary observational components are: (i) a mooring array across the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea, where the subpolar boundary current enters the basin. This array will complement an analogous array across the western margin at the exit point of the Labrador Sea, maintained by institutions in Germany and Canada; (ii) a sequential release of acoustically tracked floats in the lower limb of the AMOC at the OSNAP East and OSNAP West boundary arrays. These floats will be seeded in the two densest components of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) over the four-year period of the measurement program (2014-2018). This research award includes support for a Science Accross Virtual Institutes (SAVI) that is co-funded by NSF's Office of International and Integrative Activities.

Logistics Summary:
This is a collaborative US-led international program between Pickart (1259618, WHOI) and Lozier (1259103, Duke). Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic (OSNAP), is designed to provide a continuous record of the full-water column, trans-basin fluxes of heat, mass and freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic. The OSNAP observing system consists of two legs: one extending from southern Labrador to the southwestern tip of Greenland across the mouth of the Labrador Sea (OSNAP West), and the second from the southeastern tip of Greenland to Scotland (OSNAP East). OSNAP is a partner in the North Atlantic Virtual Institute (NAVIS), which connects science teams around the world studying climate variability and change in the North Atlantic. Beginning in 2014 through 2018, researchers will participate in various OSNAP cruises to deploy moorings, sound sources and RAFOS floats in the OSNAP East and OSNAP West regions. In 2016 two researchers will travel to Nuuk to conduct interviews as part of their outreach.

CPS will provide coordination for passengers on Air National Guard flights between NY and Kangerlussuaq. The PI will arrange and pay for all other logistics through the grants.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea05 / 31 / 2014 07 / 18 / 20142
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea05 / 31 / 2014 08 / 31 / 20142
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Iceland Basin06 / 12 / 2015 07 / 07 / 20152
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea07 / 08 / 2015 07 / 30 / 20152
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea05 / 01 / 2015 05 / 26 / 20152
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Reykjanes Ridge06 / 05 / 2015 07 / 10 / 20152
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea05 / 01 / 2016 05 / 27 / 20162
2016Greenland - Nuuk07 / 12 / 2016 07 / 21 / 20162
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Irminger Sea1
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea1
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Labrador Sea1
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Eurasian and Makarov basins observational network targets changes in the Arctic Ocean (Award# 1203473)

PI: Polyakov, Igor V. (ivpolyakov@alaska.edu)
Phone: 0(907) 474-2686 
Institute/Department: U of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://nabos.iarc.uaf.edu/data/registered/main.php
NSF_Award_Info: http://nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=120347...

Science Summary:
Responding to urgent needs for a long-term multidisciplinary observation system for understanding rapid high-latitude climate change in the Arctic Ocean, a Eurasian and Makarov Basin (EMB) observational network will be created as an element of the Arctic Observing Network (AON). Three August-September cruises, one every two years, will be conducted, with extensive measurements along continental margins, a boundary current conduit; cruises will cover vast areas from Svalbard to the East Siberian Sea. The program ties together oceanographic, chemical, and ice observations using moorings, repeated oceanographic sections, and Lagrangian drifters to provide vital information about Arctic Ocean changes. The overarching goal of the study as an AON element is to compile a cohesive picture of the state and transformations of Atlantic Water (AW) in the EMB, with particular focus on three major observational targets: (1) along-slope AW transport by the boundary currents; (2) interaction of AW branches with shelf waters, deep basin interior and upper ocean; and (3) EMB indications of changes in the upper ocean circulation. The proposed targets are broad in scope and pose a wide range of challenges to modern high-latitude observational oceanography. The EMB's size and location mean that this part of the Arctic Ocean is representative of pan-arctic conditions and processes, and therefore appropriate for long-term observing. Therefore, the project is an important element of the AON. Graduate students will be supported; female and Alaska Native students will be encouraged to participate. Program outreach will culminate in 2013 with a shipboard summer school. Data and products, critically-needed benchmarks for Arctic satellite sea-ice and altimeter measurements, will be available per AON data policy.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Polyakov (1203473, UAF) and Alkire (1203146, APL) aims to compile a cohesive picture of the climatic changes in the Eurasian and Makarov basins (EMB) of the Arctic Ocean, with particular focus on understanding three major observational targets: Along-slope AW transport by the boundary currents, Interaction of AW branches with shelf waters, deep basin interior and upper ocean, and EMB indications of changes in the upper ocean circulation. This project will also continue vital boundary current observations that have been maintained since 2002 as a part of the Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System (NABOS) program. Observations will be coordinated with other AON elements like the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO), the International Arctic Buoy Program (IABP), and the international Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) Program. Beginning in 2013 through 2017 a research team of 8 will conduct three August-September cruises every two years, with repeated oceanographic sections and deployment of moorings and Lagrangian drifters. One ~45 day summer school for graduate students will be held in 2013 aboard the icebreaker. In 2013, NSF supplement 1338948, will provide additional funds for researchers to join the NABOS cruise on board the AARI RV "Akademik Fedorov". This international, multidisciplinary effort will explore the Arctic Ocean’s Eurasian and Makarov Basins. Three August-September cruises, one every two years, are planned, with extensive measurements along continental margins, a boundary current conduit; cruises will cover vast areas from Svalbard to the East Siberian Sea. The program ties together oceanographic, chemical, and ice observations using moorings, repeated oceanographic sections, and Lagrangian drifters to provide vital information about Arctic Ocean changes. Researchers will originate from Kirkenes, Norway or St Petersburg, Russia. There will be approximately 33 days of research cruise time with 8 days in transit. Ship-based sampling will include conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD)/rosette and geochemistry sampling and attendant sea-ice and atmospheric observations. Researchers anticipate two-year-long mooring deployments. A total number of six moorings will be deployed in 2013 and for 2015 researchers plan to deploy three moorings at the A cross-slope section. Several meteorological buoys (IABPs from I. Rigor) and one ice-mass buoy (IMB) from the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (D. Perovich) will be available for deployment during each cruise. A workshop for over 20 students will be held in Fairbanks, AK as well in 2015 and 2016. Researchers will return to Russia in 2015 and 2017.

CPS will provide a satellite phone in 2015 and 2017. All logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin08 / 20 / 2013 09 / 25 / 20138
2013Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin08 / 20 / 2013 09 / 25 / 20138
2015Alaska - Fairbanks0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin08 / 20 / 2015 09 / 25 / 20158
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin08 / 20 / 2015 09 / 25 / 20158
2016Alaska - Fairbanks0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Eurasian Basin08 / 20 / 2017 09 / 25 / 20178
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Markarov Basin08 / 20 / 2017 09 / 25 / 20178
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: Continuing the Beaufort Gyre Observing System to Document and Enhance Understanding of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Reservoir Transformations and Fate (Award# 1302884)

PI: Proshutinsky, Andrey Y. (aproshutinsky@whoi.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 289.2796 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Project: http://www.whoi.edu/beaufortgyre/
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This Arctic Observing Network (AON) project will continue Beaufort Gyre Observing System (BGOS) operations begun in 2003 during 2013-2018 to document the unprecedented changes in sea ice and ocean parameters that are presently occurring in the Beaufort Gyre (BG) region. The BG is a unique circulation component within the Arctic Ocean physical environmental system reflecting a set of specific atmospheric, sea-ice, and oceanic conditions that have significant interrelationships with the Arctic-wide as well as global climate systems. Researchers will continue measuring time series of temperature, salinity, currents, geochemical tracers, sea ice draft, and sea level using bottom-anchored moorings and shipboard measurements. Three BGOS moorings plus two Japanese moorings will acquire precise data on the variations of the vertical distribution of seawater properties, bottom pressures, sea ice draft and surface waves (during open water conditions) at scientifically important sites within the BG system. Ship-based synoptic sampling covering the entire BG will continue to be performed each summer in collaboration with scientists in Canada and Japan, with shared logistics expenses, to augment the yearround mooring measurements. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, barium and 18O will continue to be measured and analyzed at a minimum of 30 standard locations along sections at 140W, 150W, ~ 75N and ~78N using a shipboard CTD/rosette to continue the long-term time series started in 2003. Samples that provide information on longer time-scales, such as CFCs and carbon tetrachloride, alkalinity, total CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium/3He, will be collected less frequently. Between CTD/rosette casts, expendable CTDs that profile to 1100 m depth will continue to be used to increase spatial resolution of the temperature and salinity fields. The work will be coordinated with the basic elements of AON to enhance effectiveness and interconnections of observational activities, and the field program will continue to accommodate other AON and NSF funded projects when able.

Logistics Summary:
This Arctic Observing Network (AON) collaborative project between Proshutinsky (1302884, WHOI) and Timmermans (1302793, Yale) continue Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) operations begun in 2003 during 2013-2018 to document the unprecedented changes in sea ice and ocean parameters that are presently occurring in the Beaufort Gyre (BG) region. Researchers will continue measuring time series of temperature, salinity, currents, geochemical tracers, sea ice draft, and sea level using bottom-anchored moorings and shipboard measurements. Three BGOS moorings plus two Japanese moorings (at no cost to this project) will acquire precise data on the variations of the vertical distribution of seawater properties, bottom pressures, sea ice draft and surface waves (during open water conditions) at scientifically important sites within the BG system. Ship-based synoptic sampling covering the entire BG will continue to be performed each summer in collaboration with scientists in Canada and Japan, with shared logistics expenses, to augment the year-round mooring measurements. Field logistics for year one are partially covered under grant 0856531. Each fall from 2014-2018 a field team of 3-4 will continue to embark and disembark the icebreaker, CCGS Louis S.-St. Laurent in Kugluktuk, Nunavut for a month of mooring deployments, collecting samples, and other scientific projects in the Beaufort Sea. The research cruise will operate from Kugluktuk, Nunavut. The researcher will ship the mooring materials, instrumentation equipment, plus installation equipment, from Woods Hole to St. John's, Newfoundland, each year to be loaded on the ship because equipment cannot be loaded in Kugluktuk. At the end of the cruise, the equipment will be shipped back to Woods Hole from St. John’s. Two researchers will meet the ship in St. John's, Newfoundland, to load/unload equipment and supplies. One additional trip for one researcher is planned for year 1 to address logistics and cruise preparation.

Collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Ocean Science (IOS) in British Columbia and the costs for the field program on a Canadian icebreaker are included in this program as a subcontract. All other logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea09 / 18 / 2014 10 / 15 / 20144
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea07 / 21 / 2015 08 / 16 / 20154
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea07 / 21 / 2016 08 / 16 / 20164
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea07 / 21 / 2017 08 / 16 / 20174
 


Project Title: PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (Award# 1630463LS)

PI: Seff, Lisa (lseff@springs.k12.ny.us)
Phone: 0(631) 324.0144 
Institute/Department: Springs School ,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE\TREC
Program Manager: Ms. Elizabeth Rom (elrom@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach\Formal Science Education: K-12 |

Project Web Site(s):
Initiative: http://www.polartrec.com/

Science Summary:
The Artic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) will administer and implement, "Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (PolarTREC)", an international program that brings together U.S. teachers to participate in cutting-edge field research with polar scientists in various, and often remote, locations in the Arctic and Antarctica. Through hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctica, participating teachers (pre-service and in-service) will improve teaching strategies, develop resources for their careers, and change how they teach STEM in the classroom. The program goal is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing educators and polar researchers together in professional collaboration. By integrating research and education, PolarTREC will help sustain and grow the considerable scientific and public enthusiasm for polar research and education. ARCUS will support a total of twelve teachers for Arctic field seasons in 2017 and Antarctic field seasons in 2017/2018. ARCUS will recruit, select, and match teachers and researchers, maintain a website for dissemination of information about the expeditions, provide orientation training for the teachers that includes field safety and communication training, provide travel support for the teachers to meet with scientists prior to deployments and for them to join the scientific expeditions in the field, and evaluate results of the program. Dissemination efforts via the website and public presentations are expected to reach many additional teachers, students, scientists and the public.

Logistics Summary:
PolarTREC teacher, Lisa Seff, will join Dr. Carin Ashjian's project (NSF grant 1603941) on board the R/V Sikuliaq in the Beaufort Sea exploring and identifing the mechanisms linking broad-scale atmospheric forcing, ocean physical response, prey-base condition and distribution, upper trophic level animal aggregations, and climate change along the Beaufort Shelf break. The team's overarching hypothesis is that atmospherically-forced (wind-induced) upwelling along this shelf break leads to enhanced feeding opportunities for intermediate links in the pelagic ecosystem (zooplankton, forage fish) that in turn sustain the exploitation of this environment by animals such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals. Support for the teacher is provided through the research project funding. For more information refer to grant 1603941 in this database.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: Physical Impacts on late Season Productivity in Changing Arctic (Award# 1734777)

PI: Shroyer, Emily L (eshroyer@coas.oregonstate.edu)
Phone: 0(541) 737.1298 
Institute/Department: Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
The Arctic region is experiencing environmental changes that have important implications for the local Arctic ecosystem and the communities that depend on it for their subsistence. For example, a longer season of reduced ice cover suggests the possibility of more marine plant growth. Yet, the rate at which plants grow may be limited by the exhaustion of available nutrients during the longer growing season. Understanding is limited by an incomplete knowledge of how physical processes help replenish nutrients in the euphotic zone late in the season. Important processes span a range of scales, from small scale turbulent mixing to regional scale wind-driven upwelling. This project will pair novel physical and biological measurements to understand the biological response to changes in the physics. The work takes advantage of a scheduled cruise to reduce costs. The project will contribute to STEM workforce enhancement by supporting the development of an early career scientist. Public outreach will be accomplished through a science communication fellowship at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. During a cruise to the Chukchi Sea in late summer, instruments to measure fine-scale shear, velocity, and turbulence will be integrated onto a towed vehicle capable of high-resolution sampling over broad areas. The towed vehicle, which is funded through an existing project, allows for continuous in-situ water sampling throughout the water column and is equipped with a suite of comprehensive biological sensors and standard physical sensors. These additions will yield a unique set of simultaneous, comprehensive high-resolution physical and biological observations. The collective analysis of these observations will provide critical insight into biophysical interactions in the changing Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This project seeks to identify the physical processes that control late season nutrient delivery in the Chukchi Sea. In September 2017, two researchers will augment NSF grant #1504394 (PI Juranek) cruise aboard the R/V Sikuliaq. Researchers will add additional instrumentation to a towed vehicle behind the Sikuliaq. The new instrumentation will measure fine-scale shear, velocity and turbulence in order to provide a clearer perspective on the impact of physical processes on nutrient delivery to the euphotic zone, and thus primary productivity.

All logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea09 / 02 / 2017 10 / 03 / 20172
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Is Nitrogen Fixation Widespread In The Chukchi And Beaufort Seas? (Award# 1504307)

PI: Sipler, Rachel E (sipler@vims.edu)
Phone: 0(804) 684.7486 
Institute/Department: Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences, Physical Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://www.bco-dmo.org/
Data: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...

Science Summary:
The extent of summer Arctic sea ice loss is increasing and now occurs earlier in the year. As a result, it is predicted that the rate of growth of phytoplankton, the base of the marine food web that sustains subsistence marine harvests by native populations, will increase within the Arctic seas. The limited amount of available nitrogen, a required nutrient for phytoplankton, eventually will restrict the level of growth. Nitrogen gas dissolved in the ocean can be converted into a form readily utilizable by phytoplankton, but this process, called nitrogen-fixation, has been considered primarily a warm-water process. The principal investigators of this project have recently observed this process in the coastal Arctic Ocean, but there is so little data that its extent remains highly speculative. If it is widespread, it will change the way we think about future scenarios for the changing Arctic marine ecosystem, subsistence fishing, and, potentially, commercial fishing in the Arctic. The project will also contribute to workforce development. The principal investigator is an early-career, female scientist. She will use the project as a mechanism to entrain an undergraduate student into research. She will also use the project to sustain an existing educational collaboration between the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences and Hampton University, a historically black university. It is hypothesized that microorganisms capable of fixing N2 (diazotrophs) are present in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, that they produce measurable rates of N2 fixation in near shore and offshore Arctic marine waters and that diazotroph community composition will differ between coastal sites, which are influenced by terrestrial inputs, versus open water sites. The Chukchi and Beaufort Seas will be sampled during a cruise in late summer 2016, when hydrographic and nutrient conditions are likely to favor diazotrophic populations. The impact that N2 fixation will have on Arctic ecosystems is dependent on its rate, spatial extent and the conditions that favor it. As a consequence, on each cruise the PIs propose to determine diazotroph community composition, examine their distributions based on the presence of the nitrogenase gene (nifH), measure rates of primary productivity and uptake of inorganic and organic N and C substrates using 15N and 13C tracer techniques, and to compare these to hydrographic, nutrient, and overall microbial community composition profiles made along cruise transects. The work will determine the extent of active N2 fixation within the region in the context of other key biogeochemical and microbial community parameters.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers involved in this collaborative project between Sipler (1504307, VIMS) and Zehr (1503614, UCSC) will study the rate and geographic extent of N2 fixation in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, which has implications for the growth of phytoplankton throughout the Arctic Ocean. The researchers will take water samples and hydrographic measurements throughout the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. In February 2016 the PI will travel to Barrow for an outreach aspect of the project, and then in July 2016 the PI will travel to Anchorage for an outreach aspect of the project. At the end of August, six researchers will board the R/V Sikuliaq in Nome, Alaska for a 4 week cruise in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. The researchers will return to port in Nome, AK, in early October. This project will work with another project on the cruise, PI Juranek (1504394), and share some of the costs. Eight researchers will return in late July 2017 for approximately two weeks of near shore sampling.

CPS will provide a community observer for the cruise, funds for travel to Barrow and Anchorage, and Barrow lodging and truck rental. Costs for the community observer with be covered by NSF grant 1504394 (Juranek). All other logistics will be arranged and paid for by the PI.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Alaska - Anchorage07 / 18 / 2016 07 / 20 / 20161
2016Alaska - Nome08 / 31 / 2016 10 / 04 / 20166
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)02 / 03 / 2015 02 / 05 / 20151
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea09 / 03 / 2016 10 / 03 / 20166
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)07 / 22 / 2017 08 / 03 / 20177
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea07 / 22 / 2017 08 / 03 / 20177
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Importance of Shelf Break Upwelling to Upper Trophic Level Ecology in the Western Beaufort Sea (Award# 1603259)

PI: Stafford, Kathleen M (stafford@apl.washington.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 685.8617 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Neil Swanberg (nswanber@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
The edge of the shallow continental shelf (called the 'shelf break') in the Beaufort Sea is vulnerable both to direct impacts of ongoing climate change and to indirect impacts that may result from increased human activity in response to new opportunities associated with ocean warming and sea ice reduction. Beaufort Sea shelf break upwelling may be increasing in frequency in response to recent large-scale atmospheric changes, potentially increasing the importance of the shelf-break environment for a range of upper trophic level animals. This grant will support research to increase our understanding of the importance of the region to upper trophic levels such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals, provide a mechanistic understanding of the linked atmosphere-ocean- plankton-predator system, and predict future consequences and impacts of environmental change on this system. A substantial communications program built upon long-standing, well-established relationships between the researchers and Alaska North Slope communities and subsistence organizations is planned both to coordinate the planned sampling and to convey the results of the research back to the communities. Information will be disseminated locally before and during two research cruises using a range of media including daily email reports, Facebook pages, blogs, interviews on local radio stations, and flyers. A comprehensive project report, a summary report written in straightforward English, and a poster describing results will be disseminated to the North Slope communities. Project members will also present results of the research in local lecture series or to interested local organizations. Involvement of a K-12 teacher in at least one of the cruises is planned. Both cruises will have the participation of a local community observer who will communicate directly with local communities during the cruise and share local knowledge with the science party. The Beaufort Sea shelf break experiences frequent upwelling of deep, nutrient rich basin water onto the shelf. Such upwelling is not only a short-term source of heat, salt, and nutrients, and a mechanism promoting elevated primary production (production response), but it also transports populations between ocean regions and depth strata or regimes (physical response), potentially modifying ecosystem structure and availability of zooplankton and fish prey to upper trophic level consumers. The Beaufort Sea shelf break is a domain of enhanced abundance of upper trophic level animals, presumably in response to elevated availability of their prey. Here we will explore and identify the mechanisms linking broad-scale atmospheric forcing, ocean physical response, prey-base condition and distribution, upper trophic level animal aggregations, and climate change along the Beaufort Shelf break. Our overarching hypothesis is that atmospherically-forced (wind-induced) upwelling along this shelf break leads to enhanced feeding opportunities for intermediate links in the pelagic ecosystem (zooplankton, forage fish) that in turn sustain the exploitation of this environment by animals such as beluga whales, seabirds, and seals. This hypothesis will be addressed using a combination of ship-based fieldwork, long-term moorings equipped with physical and biological sensors, and syntheses of retrospective and projected model output and longer-term data. The distributions, abundances, condition, and biology of multiple trophic levels will be described within the context of the dynamics of the physical environment to expand our understanding of trophic linkages and the importance of shelf-break upwelling to that system. Physical and biological model output and retrospective data will be synthesized with the mechanistic understanding gained during the field program to retrospectively characterize wind-driven upper trophic level ecosystem variability and predict how the ecosystem may respond to future projections of these atmospheric drivers and ice-ocean conditions.

Logistics Summary:
This collaborative project between Ashjian (1603941, Lead, WHOI), Okkonen (1603120, UAF), Campbell (1603321, URI) and Stafford (1603259, UW) will focus on the Western Beaufort Sea to quantify the importance of shelf-break upwelling to upper trophic level ecology. Logistic details under 1603941.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2018Alaska - Nome0
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (Award# 1630463LT)

PI: Teevan, Lenore ()
Phone:  
Institute/Department: Booker T. Washington High School,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARE\TREC
Program Manager: Ms. Elizabeth Rom (elrom@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Education and Outreach\Formal Science Education: K-12 |

Project Web Site(s):
Initiative: http://www.polartrec.com/

Science Summary:
The Artic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) will administer and implement, "Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (PolarTREC)", an international program that brings together U.S. teachers to participate in cutting-edge field research with polar scientists in various, and often remote, locations in the Arctic and Antarctica. Through hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctica, participating teachers (pre-service and in-service) will improve teaching strategies, develop resources for their careers, and change how they teach STEM in the classroom. The program goal is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing educators and polar researchers together in professional collaboration. By integrating research and education, PolarTREC will help sustain and grow the considerable scientific and public enthusiasm for polar research and education. ARCUS will support a total of twelve teachers for Arctic field seasons in 2017 and Antarctic field seasons in 2017/2018. ARCUS will recruit, select, and match teachers and researchers, maintain a website for dissemination of information about the expeditions, provide orientation training for the teachers that includes field safety and communication training, provide travel support for the teachers to meet with scientists prior to deployments and for them to join the scientific expeditions in the field, and evaluate results of the program. Dissemination efforts via the website and public presentations are expected to reach many additional teachers, students, scientists and the public.

Logistics Summary:
PolarTREC teacher, Lenore Teevan, will join Dr. Mary Beth Decker's project (Lead PI is Bi, NSF grant 1602488) aboard the R/V Sikuliaq, in the Eastern Bering Sea to study jellyfish populations. The ultimate goal is to estimate the reproductive capacity and success of this jellyfish in relation to climate variability and to investigate the potential for jellyfish population increases to become a recurring pattern in the Bering Sea under future climate scenarios. In the Bering Sea ecosystem, key questions are whether increases in jellyfish abundance are a recurring phenomenon under climate change and fishing pressure and how these population increases affect ecosystem structure. For more information refer to grant 1602488 in this database

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Sea0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: Continuing the Beaufort Gyre Observing System to Document and Enhance Understanding of the Beaufort Gyre Freshwater Reservoir Transformations and Fate (Award# 1302793)

PI: Timmermans, Mary-Louise E (mary-louise.timmermans@yale.edu)
Phone: 0(203) 432.3167 
Institute/Department: Yale University,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...
Project: http://www.whoi.edu/beaufortgyre/
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This Arctic Observing Network (AON) project will continue Beaufort Gyre Observing System (BGOS) operations begun in 2003 during 2013-2018 to document the unprecedented changes in sea ice and ocean parameters that are presently occurring in the Beaufort Gyre (BG) region. The BG is a unique circulation component within the Arctic Ocean physical environmental system reflecting a set of specific atmospheric, sea-ice, and oceanic conditions that have significant interrelationships with the Arctic-wide as well as global climate systems. Researchers will continue measuring time series of temperature, salinity, currents, geochemical tracers, sea ice draft, and sea level using bottom-anchored moorings and shipboard measurements. Three BGOS moorings plus two Japanese moorings will acquire precise data on the variations of the vertical distribution of seawater properties, bottom pressures, sea ice draft and surface waves (during open water conditions) at scientifically important sites within the BG system. Ship-based synoptic sampling covering the entire BG will continue to be performed each summer in collaboration with scientists in Canada and Japan, with shared logistics expenses, to augment the yearround mooring measurements. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, barium and 18O will continue to be measured and analyzed at a minimum of 30 standard locations along sections at 140W, 150W, ~ 75N and ~78N using a shipboard CTD/rosette to continue the long-term time series started in 2003. Samples that provide information on longer time-scales, such as CFCs and carbon tetrachloride, alkalinity, total CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium/3He, will be collected less frequently. Between CTD/rosette casts, expendable CTDs that profile to 1100 m depth will continue to be used to increase spatial resolution of the temperature and salinity fields. The work will be coordinated with the basic elements of AON to enhance effectiveness and interconnections of observational activities, and the field program will continue to accommodate other AON and NSF funded projects when able.

Logistics Summary:
This Arctic Observing Network (AON) collaborative project between Proshutinsky (1302884, WHOI) and Timmermans (1302793, Yale) continue Beaufort Gyre Observational System (BGOS) operations begun in 2003 during 2013-2018 to document the unprecedented changes in sea ice and ocean parameters that are presently occurring in the Beaufort Gyre (BG) region. Researchers will continue measuring time series of temperature, salinity, currents, geochemical tracers, sea ice draft, and sea level using bottom-anchored moorings and shipboard measurements. Logistic details under 1302884.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Beaufort Sea0
 


Project Title: AON: Observing the Evolving Central Arctic Ocean with Ice-Tethered Profilers (Award# 1303644)

PI: Toole, John (jtoole@whoi.edu)
Phone: 0(508) 289.2531 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/aon-cadis/
Data: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=13...
Project: http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=20756

Science Summary:
This awards sustains sampling of the upper Arctic Ocean water properties through all seasons using Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) instruments. Studies conducted over the last decade indicate that the Arctic is both a sensitive indicator of climate change and an active driver of climate variability. As evidenced by the strikingly low summer sea ice extent estimates recorded since August 2007 and large anomalies in liquid fresh water content (manifested by upper-ocean salinity), significant changes in the Arctic appear to be underway now. It is critical that researchers continue to observe the Arctic during this time of rapid evolution to quantify the physical changes that are occurring, to better understand their causes, and to assess their impacts on the Arctic Ocean climate system. Researchers on this grant will construct and deploy 5 ITP instrument systems annually throughout the Arctic Ocean to acquire, process and make the data from these instruments freely and immediately available to all interested parties to support science and operational activities via our project web site, the GTS and the Argo float program data assembly centers. Improvements to sensor design and added variables will be tested during deployments to increase the platform lifetime and expand the measurement suite on board the ITP. On-going partnerships with European and Asian investigators employing the WHOI ITP and other similar instruments holds promise for continued broad spatial coverage of the Arctic. They will continue to use the ITP program to support outreach activities designed for both specialized and general audiences including giving briefings to teachers, science journalists, policy makers and operational groups, contributing to museum presentations, making school visits and continuing to evolve the project web site http://www.whoi.edu/itp.

Logistics Summary:
This project will continue sustained sampling (begun under NSF grant 0856479) of the upper Arctic Ocean water properties through all seasons using Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) instruments (5 systems per year) in conjunction with companion instrument systems that sample meteorological, sea ice and ocean mixed layer parameters. In years 2015 - 2017, the PIs have planned for 3 deployment expeditions per year; Co-PI Rick Krishfield will lead and/or coordinate the ITP deployments/field efforts - a spring ice camp ITP deployment operation supported by aircraft and two late-summer operations from icebreaker. Of the latter, one set of deployments will be in conjunction with the annual Beaufort Gyre Observing System (BGOS, PI Proshutinsky, award #1302884) cruise requiring no additional personnel, travel or shipping costs from the ITP program. The second icebreaker-supported operation each year has been budgeted as being staged out of Murmansk, Russia. Additional cruise opportunities might also help this project deploy buoys. The sea-ice camp ITP deployment in April 2015 will be in conjuncture with the NPEO/Morison project #0856330. In 2016, the team deployed to Longyearbyen but did not reach Barneo due to multiple cracking events on the sea ice runway. In 2017, under NSF supplement 1723848, three field technicians will travel to Svalbard and the Barneo ice camp and will spend about three days at Barneo.

In 2017, CPS will provide on the ground logistics assistance, temporary storage, truck rental and lodging in Longyearbyen. All other logistics, including passenger air support and shipping of cargo, will be covered by the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean07 / 12 / 2014 09 / 21 / 20142
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - North Pole04 / 09 / 2015 04 / 11 / 20152
2015Norway - Longyearbyen04 / 02 / 2015 04 / 13 / 20153
2016Norway - Longyearbyen04 / 08 / 2016 04 / 15 / 20163
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Arctic Ocean2
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - North Pole04 / 10 / 2017 04 / 13 / 20173
2017Norway - Longyearbyen04 / 07 / 2017 04 / 17 / 20173
 


Project Title: Arctic Observing and Science for Sustainability (Award# 1536175)

PI: Tung, Ka-Kit (ktung@uw.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 685.3794 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Applied Mathematics 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\ICER
Program Manager: Ms. Maria Uhle (muhle@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://ladsweb.nascom.nasa.gov
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...
Data: http://www.nsof.class.noaa.gov/saa/products/welcom...

Science Summary:
This award provides support to U.S. researchers participating in a project competitively selected by a 14-country initiative on global change research through the Belmont Forum. The Belmont Forum is a high level group of the world's major and emerging funders of global environmental change research and international science councils. It aims to accelerate delivery of the international environmental research most urgently needed to remove critical barriers to sustainability by aligning and mobilizing international resources. Each partner country provides funding for their researchers within a consortium to alleviate the need for funds to cross international borders. This approach facilitates effective leveraging of national resources to support excellent research on topics of global relevance best tackled through a multinational approach, recognizing that global challenges need global solutions. Working together in this Collaborative Research Action, the partner agencies have provided support for research projects that utilize existing Arctic observing systems, datasets and models to evaluate key sustainability challenges and opportunities in the Arctic region, to innovate new sustainability science theory and approaches to these challenges and opportunities, and support decision-making towards a sustainable Arctic environment. This award provides support for the U.S. researchers to cooperate in consortia that consist of partners from at least three of the participating countries and that bring together natural scientists, social scientists and end users (e.g., policy makers, regulators, NGOs, communities and industry). The Arctic Fog Variability collaborative research effort will study the spatiotemporal variability of fog in light of recent sea ice variability and in the context of increasing interest in alternative commercial shipping routes that would transit the Arctic. This partnership between Chinese, US, Canadian, and Italian investigators will utilize available in situ and satellite environmental information and navigational and economic data as well as conduct shore-based and ship-based sampling of fog variables during the peak of fog occurrence in mid-summer. A series of modeling experiments will be conducted to determine future radiative and meteorological conditions that would induce fog and determine the potential routes of vessels through the Arctic given certain Representative Concentration Pathway scenarios. Finally, the envelope of economic impact will be determined based on a suite of variables using real-life case studies for container vessels traveling between Europe and Asia. This project unites observationalists, modelers, and end-users, including shipping companies, towards a better understanding of changing operational conditions for more informed activity in Arctic waters.

Logistics Summary:
This international Belmont Forum project is a collaborative between the United States, China, Italy, and Canada. This collaboration will study the relationship between fog and solar irradiance, including fog-sea ice feedback, leading to the development of better simulation/modelling capacity for future fog patterns in these regions. This will be accomplished in three parts: 1) Improving the fog dataset of the Arctic integrating in-situ records, 2) developing fog detection algorithms from satellite-based images, and 3) conducting field campaigns at fixed sites and aboard ships. Field work at fixed sites will occur at 2 or 3 places for continuous observation. Potential candidates include Barrow, Alaska; Tuktouaktuk, Canada; and the Svalbard Islands. Marine observation of fog will be conducted from the MV Xuelong in the Chukchi Sea every two years, as well as from international collaborative cruises with vessels from Norway, South Korea, Canada and the United States from 2016-2019.

All logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grants.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)05 / 01 / 2016 05 / 21 / 20163
2016Canada - Tuktoyaktuk06 / 01 / 2016 06 / 21 / 20163
2016Norway - Svalbard08 / 01 / 2016 08 / 21 / 20163
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Canada Basin1
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea1
2017Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2017Norway - Svalbard1
2018Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2018Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2018Norway - Svalbard1
2019Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - Canada Basin1
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea1
2019Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2019Norway - Svalbard1
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: A Bering Strait Ocean Observing System for the Pacific Inflow to the Arctic- a fundamental part of the Arctic Observing Network (Award# 1304052)

PI: Woodgate, Rebecca (woodgate@apl.washington.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 221.3268 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Polar Science Center 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://psc.apl.washington.edu/HLD/Bstrait/bstrait....
Data: http://www.aoos.org/aoos-data-resources/
Data: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov
Logistics: http://www.norsemanmaritime.com
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=13...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
This AON project will support a comprehensive observationally-based measurement scheme for the Bering Strait, which will combine in situ observations with traditional knowledge from the Bering Strait communities and results from a 4km resolution ice-ocean model, ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean phase II). Temperature, salinity and velocity data from the Bering Strait and data products of oceanic fluxes will be measured to meet the needs of numerous scientific, climate and industrial (e.g., oil/gas exploration, shipping) studies in the region. Via a "one-stop" website (with permanent archiving at national archives), the project will provide these data and data products to all interested parties. It will develop a two-way exchange of information with native communities, drawing on results from a separately funded project (led by the native corporation Kawerak, Inc) documenting traditional knowledge of ocean currents and change in the Bering Strait region. Furthermore, bridging the traditional gap between observationalists and modelers, it will undertake a pilot study for future AON observational strategies which must surely combine observations and high quality modeling. The effort continues and expands upon decades of measurements in the Bering Strait region and constitutes an NSF contribution to the interagency Russian-American Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) partnership.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Woodgate (1304052, UW) and Heimbach (1304050, MIT) is funded by the NSF; the research contributes to various partnerships, including ONR partnerships and the U.S. – Russia Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) NOAA effort. Researchers will continue to measure and improve quantification of ocean fluxes through the Bering Strait, the gateway between the Pacific and the Arctic oceans. They will use a combination of approaches, including in-situ and remote observations (with new observations and existing data reaching back to 1990), modeling results, and indigenous knowledge. As part of the Arctic Observing Network (AON), the researchers will take five years (2014-2018) of mooring measurements, supported by annual cruises, to measure the water properties and oceanic fluxes in volume, heat and freshwater of the water flowing through the Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean. In July of each year, 5-6 researchers will participate in a ~7 day cruise in the U.S. waters of the Bering Strait region. Each year, they will deploy three oceanographic moorings at sites established in the 1990s and 2000s; and run supporting CTD sections. For the July 2016 cruise, participants will embark and disembark the Norseman II vessel in Nome, Alaska. In addition, Woodgate will work with Kawerak Inc., in Nome to establish meetings about the project in communities in the Bering Strait region.

CPS will provide vessel support via a subcontract and communications equipment. All other logistics will be arranged and paid for by the PI from the research grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Alaska - Nome06 / 30 / 2014 07 / 07 / 20145
2014Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait06 / 30 / 2014 07 / 07 / 20145
2015Alaska - Nome07 / 01 / 2015 07 / 09 / 20158
2015Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait07 / 01 / 2015 07 / 09 / 20158
2016Alaska - Nome07 / 07 / 2016 07 / 15 / 20165
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait07 / 07 / 2016 07 / 15 / 20165
2017Alaska - Nome07 / 10 / 2017 07 / 17 / 20176
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait07 / 10 / 2017 07 / 17 / 20176
2018Alaska - Nome07 / 10 / 2018 07 / 17 / 20186
2018Arctic Ocean and Seas - Bering Strait07 / 10 / 2018 07 / 17 / 20186
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Is Nitrogen Fixation Widespread In The Chukchi And Beaufort Seas? (Award# 1503614)

PI: Zehr, Jonathan P (zehrj@ucsc.edu)
Phone: 0(831) 459.4009 
Institute/Department: U of California, Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. Cynthia Suchman ()
Discipline(s): | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://www.bco-dmo.org/
Data: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...

Science Summary:
The extent of summer Arctic sea ice loss is increasing and now occurs earlier in the year. As a result, it is predicted that the rate of growth of phytoplankton, the base of the marine food web that sustains subsistence marine harvests by native populations, will increase within the Arctic seas. The limited amount of available nitrogen, a required nutrient for phytoplankton, eventually will restrict the level of growth. Nitrogen gas dissolved in the ocean can be converted into a form readily utilizable by phytoplankton, but this process, called nitrogen-fixation, has been considered primarily a warm-water process. The principal investigators of this project have recently observed this process in the coastal Arctic Ocean, but there is so little data that its extent remains highly speculative. If it is widespread, it will change the way we think about future scenarios for the changing Arctic marine ecosystem, subsistence fishing, and, potentially, commercial fishing in the Arctic. The project will also contribute to workforce development. The principal investigator is an early-career, female scientist. She will use the project as a mechanism to entrain an undergraduate student into research. She will also use the project to sustain an existing educational collaboration between the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences and Hampton University, a historically black university. It is hypothesized that microorganisms capable of fixing N2 (diazotrophs) are present in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, that they produce measurable rates of N2 fixation in near shore and offshore Arctic marine waters and that diazotroph community composition will differ between coastal sites, which are influenced by terrestrial inputs, versus open water sites. The Chukchi and Beaufort Seas will be sampled during a cruise in late summer 2016, when hydrographic and nutrient conditions are likely to favor diazotrophic populations. The impact that N2 fixation will have on Arctic ecosystems is dependent on its rate, spatial extent and the conditions that favor it. As a consequence, on each cruise the PIs propose to determine diazotroph community composition, examine their distributions based on the presence of the nitrogenase gene (nifH), measure rates of primary productivity and uptake of inorganic and organic N and C substrates using 15N and 13C tracer techniques, and to compare these to hydrographic, nutrient, and overall microbial community composition profiles made along cruise transects. The work will determine the extent of active N2 fixation within the region in the context of other key biogeochemical and microbial community parameters.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers involved in this collaborative project between Sipler (1504307, VIMS) and Zehr (1503614, UCSC) will study the rate and geographic extent of N2 fixation in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, which has implications for the growth of phytoplankton throughout the Arctic Ocean. The researchers will take water samples and hydrographic measurements throughout the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Logistic details under 1504307.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Alaska - Nome0
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)0
2016Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea0
2017Alaska - Nome0
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea0
 


Generated from:
 
Parameters used to generate this report:Region = "Arctic Ocean and Seas", Season = "2017", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 28
 
ARLSS_ProjectsDetail