Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: DDRIG: High Latitude Adaptations and Geoarchaeology at the Little John site, Yukon Territory, Canada (Award# 1603959)

PI: Dixon, E. James (jdixon@unm.edu)
Phone: 0(505) 277.4210 
Institute/Department: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ASSP
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Social and Human Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/anth225/Excavations_at_t...
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
This award supports a dissertation project to conduct excavation, sampling and lithic, geoarchaeological, chronological, and paleoenvironmental analysis of materials from the Little John site in Yukon, Canada. The site is important as a stratified, Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene site with archaeological assemblages relating to the so-called Nenana/Chindadn (without microblades) and Denali (microblades) complexes. The site includes a locus with stratigraphic separation of paleosols and holds promise for evaluating the proposition that these two complexes are culturally distinct (presumably implying unrelated populations) and/or functionally distinct (i.e., relating to technological evolution or seasonal tool kit changes) as has been argued variously from other sites in central Alaska. The co-PI (Ph.D. student) will help supervise the excavation and lead the analyses to evaluate whether the assemblage types are stratigraphically and chronologically distinct and whether they correlate with paleoenvironmental change. These correlations presumably will yield insights to help clarify the long-standing debate about the significance of these assemblages in the archaeology of Eastern Beringia.

Logistics Summary:
Researchers will conduct excavations at the "Little John" archeology site in Yukon, Canada. This will take places as part of an ongoing excavation at the site managed by the PI Dr. James Dixon. During three weeks between May and August of 2016, the Co-PI will co-direct excavations at the Little John site. A follow up visit between May and July of 2017 may be required if additional sample collection is deemed necessary. Samples will be analyzed at Yukon College in Whitehorse, Canada, as well at the researchers home institution at the University of New Mexico.

All logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Canada - Little John Site05 / 30 / 2016 08 / 13 / 20161
2017Canada - Little John Site05 / 30 / 2017 06 / 04 / 20171
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Studies of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and Space Weather Using the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS) (Award# 1264146)

PI: Engebretson, Mark J (engebret@augsburg.edu)
Phone: 0(612) 330.1067 
Institute/Department: Augsburg College, Department of Physics 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\AGS
Program Manager: Mr. John Meriwether (jmeriwet@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Space Physics\Cusp | Space Physics\Ionospheric Physics | Space Physics\Magnetic Storms | Space Physics\Magnetospheric Physics | Space Physics\Solar-Terrestrial Relations | Space Physics\ULF Waves |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://maccs.datatransport.org
Institute: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/about.html
Data: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/index.html
Data: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/request.jsp
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...

Science Summary:
This project consists of two activities. The first will continue the operation and data distribution of observations from the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS). The second is a research program using the MACCS data along with SuperDARN radar, the Relocatable Atmospheric Observatory in Resolute Bay, nominally conjugate stations in the Antarctic and GPS TEC receivers at two of the MACCS sites. Data from the AMPERE satellites also will be used. The project identifies four topics: * Performing detailed studies of dayside high-latitude ULF waves and transient events, using multi-instrument ground-based and satellite data. * Providing observational and theoretical support for the recently-launched Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission by investigating the role of ULF waves in energizing or depleting radiation belt electrons during magnetic storms, in part using the recently developed ULF index. * Investigating the high-latitude field-aligned current structures associated with both transient events and steady convection, using magnetic field and GPS TEC data along with global data from the AMPERE project. * Using the combination of MACCS data with simultaneous data from both low-orbiting and high-orbiting satellites to separate spatial and temporal variations in magnetospheric and ionospheric processes, and carrying out theoretical and modeling studies of the excitation and propagation of ULF waves through the global magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This study will use the BATS-R-US global magnetohydrodynamic simulation code. The MACCS data are freely distributed to the entire science community.

Logistics Summary:
The collaborative project between Engebretson (1264146, Augsburg) and Moldwin (1265651, U of Michigan) consists of two activities. The first will continue the operation and data distribution of observations from the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS). The second is a research program using the MACCS data along with SuperDARN radar, the Relocatable Atmospheric Observatory in Resolute Bay, nominally conjugate stations in the Antarctic and GPS TEC receivers at two of the MACCS sites. This grant continues support begun under NSF grant #0827903 for the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS) in Arctic Canada. Much of the equipment at the sites has been operational for over a decade. Over the course of four years beginning in 2014, the PI will make about one 2-week trip per year to conduct maintenance on one or more of the MACCS sites.

CPS will monitor the Iridium connections to two sites--Coral Harbour, Southampton Island, Nunavut; and Nain, Laborador. SRI will collect all MACCS data on SRI's server and provide support for the SRI-written data collection software and revise the code as needed. All other support will be organized and paid for by the PI.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island07 / 01 / 2014 07 / 15 / 20141
2014Canada - Nain07 / 01 / 2014 07 / 15 / 20141
2015Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island07 / 01 / 2015 07 / 15 / 20151
2015Canada - Nain07 / 01 / 2015 07 / 15 / 20151
2016Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island07 / 01 / 2016 07 / 15 / 20161
2016Canada - Nain07 / 01 / 2016 07 / 15 / 20161
2017Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island07 / 01 / 2017 07 / 07 / 20171
2017Canada - Nain1
 


Project Title: RAPID: Quantifying the Effects of Historical Indigenous Burning and Bison on Mountain Valley Forest Structure and Fire Regimes (Award# 1724770)

PI: Falk, Donald A (dafalk@u.arizona.edu)
Phone: 0(520) 626.7201 
Institute/Department: U of Arizona, Tucson, School of Renewable Natural Resources 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ASSP
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Biology\Dendrochronology | Biology\Fire Science |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://libguides.library.arizona.edu/GIS/data
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
Data: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/paleoclimato...
Data: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/paleoclimato...
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
This award is supported as Rapid Response Research (RAPID). The investigators plan to recover data that will be destroyed by a planned forest burn scheduled for summer 2017. Pre- and post-colonial period Native Americans actively managed their natural environments through the use of fire to produce grasslands and boost bison populations and this at-risk data has the potential to provide critical insights into the natural resource management practices of Native North Americans from the 1600's to the present. A key element of the research is to use the recovered data to map the landscape of the Clearwater Valley in Alberta, Canada and to estimate the amount of landscape change that has occurred between the 1600s to present in order to inform bison restorationists about the degree of land management their restoration goals are likely to require. Understanding the historic ecosystem and bison population management in the region is a critical part of the decision to reintroduce bison species in the Rocky Mountain region. As a subsistence species utilized by early Native Americans for food, shelter, clothing, and religious practice, bison are a cultural and natural keystone species in the region. As a species hunted to near extinction by the late 1800's, currently, both public and Tribal land managers are considering projects to reintroduce bison into contemporary ecosystems. The researchers argue that after bison and traditional indigenous land management were removed from these ecosystems in the late 1800's the landscape substantially changed, to the point that it may no longer be suitable for bison reintroduction. The project will map, quantify, and provide insights into how Indigenous burning historically created habitats supporting substantial bison populations in the Rocky Mountains near Banff National Park (BNP) in Canada, which can be compared to other regions of the North where cultural burning was also practiced. In addition, the researchers will provide insights into the implications of these landscape transformations and their disappearance for the management of forests, fire, and fauna today. The region for the RAPID is anticipated to be particularly well suited for study; 1) Banff National Park has a bison reintroduction program and 2) it is a region where Indigenous peoples, such as the Kootenai, historically used cultural burning to create open and nutrient-enriched grassy habitat for bison. Today, these and similar Rocky Mountain valleys are densely forested due to the exclusion of traditional indigenous burning, the introduction of modern fire suppression, and other factors. In order to assess and achieve bison restoration objectives similar to what existed historically, it is vital to quantify landscape condition during the period of traditional indigenous management. Coordination between fire management programs and bison reintroduction groups could benefit the interests of both groups and improve the odds of attaining bison population restoration goals. This project will demonstrate and quantify changes in bison habitat by creating a 3D time-lapse map showing the transformation of the Clearwater Valley in Alberta, Canada from the 1600s to present. The research team will recreate the valley's fire history using modern dendrochronology, cross-dating tree scars left by historical fires. This phase of research will produce a stand age structure reconstruction, a traditional fire scar history using the program FHAES, a climate reconstruction (to determine the degree of anthropogenic vs. climatic influence on the fire regime(s) over time), a comparison of known historical human and bison population events (such as smallpox outbreaks) with fire frequency and tree recruitment shifts, and spatiotemporal GIS maps compiling all of the above. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) will collect 3-dimensional landscape data to measure the valley's modern biotic landscape. A digital time-lapse map will incorporate the tree-ring history to extend the 3D landscape model back in time. Lastly, the investigators will derive estimates of how much biomass burning has changed over the course of the last 300+ years in the Clearwater Valley sample area. The project's novel fusion of dendrochronology and 3D spatiotemporal GIS expands the realm of what is possible for scientific methodology across disciplinary boundaries. The results of this study will also be applicable across national boundaries by showing not only how much change in the landscape would be necessary for Banff National Park's bison restoration goals, but also demonstrate the need for similar investigations by land managers across North America.

Logistics Summary:
This RAPID project will fund the study of “cultural burning” in the forests of Alberta, Canada. In the summer of 2017, the Alberta Government plans to conduct a prescribed burn in Clearwater Valley just outside Banff National Park. This valley contains a rare refugium of fire-scarred trees and debris dating back to 1635, and thus contains potentially valuable data on pre-colonial Indigenous fires management practices. There is a risk the prescribed burn could destroy all of the historic burn data for the Clearwater Valley, which is why the researchers want to study the area before any burning commences. Over a two week period starting August 1st, 2017, a field crew of 5 researchers will perform field work in Clearwater valley. They will take wedge and cross section samples of fire-scarred trees and dead wood, as well as increment cores from live trees. Tree-level measurements will include diameter at breast height (DBH), stem counts of surrounding trees great than 3 inches DBH, the number of trees with fire scars (along with the cardinal direction of those scars), and sample tree slope and aspect. Additionally the researchers will fly a UAV over the research area to create a 3D model of landscape.

All logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Canada - Clearwater Valley08 / 01 / 2017 08 / 14 / 20175
 


Project Title: CryoSat Validation Experiment (Award# CryoVEx)

PI: Forsberg, Rene (rf@spacecenter.dk)
Phone: 45(5719) 3532 
Institute/Department: Danish National Space Center,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: DK\Research/Higher Ed\DTU\DNSC
Program Manager: Dr. Jennifer Mercer (jmercer@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere |

Project Web Site(s):

Science Summary:
The Danish National Space Institute is part of the CRYOVEX campaign, the object of which is to provide pre-launch reference datasets for Cryosat2. NSI researchers undertake measurements of sea ice thickness and make Ice Profiles from measurements with altimeters from helicopters. The campaign is aimed in particular at understanding miscellaneous sources of error: snow loading, ice density, preferential sampling and various freeboard measurement errors. These experiments are critical in two ways. Firstly, independent ice-thickness measurements provide a means by which ESA can test CryoSat-2's performance, guaranteeing that the measurements are correct. Secondly, the results from the ground experiments will be used to correct errors in CryoSat-2 data, which can arise due to the complexity and variability of natural ice surfaces. CryoSat-2 is aimed at observing changes in the Earth’s cryosphere, i.e. changes to the ice- and snow-covered parts of the Earth. Extensive validation campaigns to gather a multitude of ground truth measurements were carried out in the Arctic prior to the launch of the first CryoSat mission and now continue for CryoSat-2. The CryoSat2 Validation Experiment, CRYOVEX, is a joint effort of the National Space Institute and the European Space Agency ESA in cooperation with the Alfred Wegener Institute.

Logistics Summary:
The Canadian Arctic Sea Ice Mass Balance Observatory (CASIMBO) is a long-term measurement programme carried forward by the University of Alberta in continuation of earlier activities in the framework of the European/ESA Greenice and CryoVEx projects. It involves systematic, large-scale in-situ and airborne snow and ice measurements which will provide important input for CryoSat-2 validation. CryoVex activities address the different components of the sea ice thickness profile, i.e. ice thickness, snow thickness, ice freeboard, and snow surface elevation, which are sensed differently by the different sensors. EM sounding is the only method to obtain direct ice thickness estimates, and therefore is essential for the validation of CryoSat-2 thickness retrievals, which are derived from freeboard measurements and assumptions of the isostatic balance for which the densities of snow and ice need to be known. However, obtained thicknesses represent total sea ice thickness, i.e. ice plus snow thickness. Therefore, differences between EM and CryoSat-2 thickness retrievals are expected and will be resolved by additional snow thickness measurements using the combination of airborne laser and radar altimetry, ground penetrating radar, and in-situ snow thickness profiling. The project will be conducting aerial surveys with 2 Twin Otters and a BT-67. The Danish Space Center planned a number of campaigns in spring/summer of 2008, including DAMOCLES/Tara, an IPY Arctic Ocean project that looks at the physical and ecological environment north of Greenland and the ESA's CRYOSAT cal /val effort.The CRYOSAT work is completed in collaboration with Liz Morris from Scott Polar Research in Cambridge. The airborne part of the campaign was carried out by DTU Space (former Danish National Space Center, DNSC) using a Twin Otter chartered from Air Greenland. The main purpose was to collect coincident ASIRAS and laser elevation data form validation sites on land and sea ice and in addition offer logistical support to ground teams. Overflights of corner reflectors were done at main validation sites in order to calibrate the ASIRAS data. The datasets from this campaign will be important for understanding the CryoSat-2 radar signals. The airborne part of CryoVEx 2008 was successfully carried out between April 15 and May 8 and the datasets have been stored and secured at DTU Space and Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI). Afterwards extensive data processing has been done by DTU Space and AWI in cooperation. In 2009, the LOMGRAV (Lomonosov Ridge airborne gravity survey) an airborne geophysical survey of the area north of Ellesmere Island and Greenland, was carried out by 3 scientists (2 Danish, 1 Canadian), and an air crew of 3. A tentative time plan was formulated to avoid operations from CFS Alert during operation BoxTop, with a change of scientists planned for late April at Eureka. PCSP-coordinated fuel arrangements for LOMGRAV. Partial fuel at Alert was flown in by the US Air Force in March 2009. PCSP provided aircraft charter arrangements, lodging at Resolute Bay and Eureka, and the coordination of fuel. In addition, in 2009, the GreenArc camp an international and interdisciplinary science ice camp north of Greenland was surveyed mid to late April. From the ice camp climate-related science in the areas of sea-ice structure and drift, oceanography, carbon exchange and shallow sub-bottom sediment coring was carried out. Ice conditions and thickness in a wider area north of Greenland and Canada was also surveyed by airborne lidar and radar methods, by lidar and radar measurements from Twin-Otter and a NASA P-3 aircraft. Researchers will continue air operations each year. The National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Space), in cooperation with York University and Environment Canada, continue its validation and monitoring program for sea ice and land ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Canada and in Greenland in March/April 2017, following similar coordinated activities in 2014. The 2017 flights will be closely coordinated with the PanArcMip EC/AWI flight program using the Polar-5 DC3 aircraft, as well as sea-ice flights of the EU ICE-ARC project, led by the British Antarctic Survey. The 2017 CryoVEx program falls in two separated campaigns, to ease load on CFS Alert, and to secure coordinated laser and radar flights with Polar-5 and NASA IceBridge. CryoVEx-2017 Phase 1: March 2017 March 20-31 will involve operations with laser, Ku- and Ka- band radar operations with Norlandair, Iceland, Twin-Otter TF-POF over sea ice north of Greenland and Canada, and flights over sea ice in the Baffin Bay the Greenland Ice Sheet. CryoVEx-2017 Phase 2: April 5-23 will involve sea ice flights from Cambridge Bay (April 7-9), CFS Alert (April 10-19), and Svalbard/Station Nord, as well as an intensive sea-ice in-situ program with landings on sea ice along CryoSat tracks north of CFS Alert. Two aircraft will be used: A Twin-Otter from Kenn Borek Air, Calgary, for sea-ice landings, and a British Antarctic Survey Twin-Otter VP-FAZ, functioning as safety back-up for the sea ice landings, as well as a supplementary lidar/radar measurement aircraft. This phase of the project will also include measurements over land and sea ice in Svalbard, in cooperation with the Norwegian Polar Institute and Univ. of Oslo. The CryoVEx-2017 project is funded by the European Space Agency and involves Canadian, Danish, British and Norwegian research teams, as well as Dutch radar company MetaSensing BV. Fuel for the operations at CFS Alert will be provided by the US Air National Guard, in cooperation with the US National Science Foundation.

CPS will provide scheduling, coordination, and billing support for flight and fueling operations at CFS Alert as routed through Thule Air Base. The NSF will recoup the cost of this support via a direct-bill arrangement with the PI's institution. The researchers will arrange and pay for all other logistics.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2008Greenland - Thule0
2009Greenland - Thule0
2011Greenland - Thule0
2012Greenland - Thule0
2014Greenland - Thule0
2017Canada - Alert, Ellesmere Island03 / 21 / 2017 04 / 18 / 20171
2017Greenland - Thule0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Initial Peopling and Settlement of Eastern Newfoundland (Award# 1522977)

PI: Holly, Donald H (dhholly@eiu.edu)
Phone: 0(217) 581.6593 
Institute/Department: Eastern Illinois University,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ASSP
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Social and Human Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...

Science Summary:
This project is an archaeological examination of the cultural and ecological factors that contributed to the colonization and settlement of Newfoundland by Maritime Archaic peoples. The Maritime Archaic peoples (ca. 6,000 B.C.-1,000 B.C.) were the first to colonize the Eastern Subarctic and Arctic of North America. They created a way of life that allowed them to successfully occupy the entire coast and near interior of Newfoundland and Labrador for thousands of years, and maintain relationships with contemporaneous cultures that stretched throughout much of northeastern North America. However, we still know very little about their initial settlement of the region, their early social organization, and the ways these processes were affected by ecological factors. The aim of this research is to examine the initial settlement of Newfoundland within the larger context of the peopling of northeastern North America and the roles that historical processes, both cultural and environmental, played in that broader framework. This will include new archaeological excavations at early Maritime Archaic sites in Newfoundland, as well as investigation and analysis of existing Maritime Archaic artifact collections from throughout the region. It will also examine ecological data, such as plant and animal remains, to assess the wider role of environmental change in the initial occupation of the eastern Subarctic and how early cultural adaptations developed within northern coastal and island ecosystems. This project is an international collaboration of professional archaeologists, graduate students, and undergraduates. The training and education of undergraduate students is a critical component of this project. Moreover, project members will continue to collaborate with local communities to develop economic and preservation initiatives related to the archaeological sites and cultural heritage associated with this research and to create educational opportunities for students and community members in the region. This research will have extensive implications for our understanding of how and when people first settled the easternmost region of North America, and northern coasts and islands more generally. The earliest human migration onto any landscape is a complex, interactive, and dynamic historical process. In North America, the colonization process is often generalized within an evolutionary perspective that envisions humans simply reacting to ecological opportunities offered by newly available landscapes and resources at the end of the last Ice Age. It is also often framed as solely a Paleoindian process that did not extend far into the Holocene, despite the fact that large portions of northern North America were not colonized until the Middle Holocene. New archaeological fieldwork and collections analysis concerning the Archaic expansion onto and around the island of Newfoundland will inform larger models of human colonization within the region, as well as in other Arctic and Subarctic coastal zones. This includes the initial peopling of North America on the other side of the continent and the role that northern coasts and islands played in that process. It will also help us better understand the interaction between Archaic people and their environment and the adaptation strategies they employed in unknown coastal and island landscapes, as well as the relative impact they had on those environments. To address these issues the research team will survey and date extant collections to fine-tune the chronological resolution of the initial colonization processes of Newfoundland. They will also conduct new excavations at the Stock Cove and Stock Cove West sites in eastern Newfoundland where Maritime Archaic deposits have been found that appear to stratigraphically correlate to their earliest occupations of the region and that have the first evidence of architecture by Archaic peoples on the island. This will be assessed with a suite of new dates and analyses of material remains recovered from those excavations. Additionally, new geophysical surveys employing ground penetrating radar and magnetometry will be conducted to locate new Archaic deposits to help focus the excavations and noninvasively assess other archaeological deposits that could address the earliest settlement of Newfoundland. Finally, ecological data (e.g. insects, faunal remains, macrobotanicals) will be collected and analyzed to help reconstruct environmental patterns that may have impacted and influenced the peopling and settlement process by the Maritime Archaic. This project will have broader impacts that include: 1) the first excavation and analysis of a Maritime Archaic structure on the island of Newfoundland; 2) the contribution of important data to our understanding of Archaic social organization and settlement in the eastern Subarctic/Arctic; 3) obtaining key environmental data that will assist with the assessment of environmental change throughout the Holocene and may inform the development of modern policies regarding the mitigation of environmental change and economic impacts (e.g., sea mammal hunting, fishing quotas, wildlife conservation, sea ice extent, coastal erosion); 4) the training of undergraduate students in archaeological field and laboratory methods; 5) international dissemination of our results to both academic and public audiences, and; 6) increased interaction with local communities, regional museums, and other interested parties within Newfoundland and Labrador concerning their heritage and cultural resources, including public lectures and the development of educational tools (e.g., social media, historical markers, pamphlets, booklets) for those communities.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Wolff (1640962, Lead, SUNY at Albany) and Holly (1522977, Eastern Illinois University) is an international and multi-institutional project that will examine the cultural and ecological factors that contributed to the colonization and settlement of eastern Newfoundland by Maritime Archaic peoples during the Middle Holocene. See 1640962 for logistics details.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Canada - Stock Cove Field Site0
2016Canada - Stock Cove West Field Site0
2017Canada - Stock Cove Field Site0
2017Canada - Stock Cove West Field Site0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: The Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) (Award# 1602615)

PI: Holmes, Robert Max (rmholmes@whrc.org)
Phone: 0(508) 444.1548 
Institute/Department: Woods Hole Research Center,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences\Biogeochemistry | Geological Sciences\Climate Change | Geological Sciences\Hydrology | Geological Sciences\Rivers |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.arcticgreatrivers.org
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Just like changes in blood chemistry can be used to diagnose an individual's health, so too can changes in river water chemistry be used to evaluate the condition of a river's watershed. In the Arctic, six massive rivers capture freshwater runoff from two-thirds of the land area that drains to the Arctic Ocean. The chemistry of this runoff reflects watershed characteristics (e.g. soil composition), and carries essential nutrients to the marine environment. The overarching scientific objective of the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) is to make sustained observations of the chemistry of these six large rivers, which is vital for assessing changes on land that subsequently impact physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Arctic Ocean. The project involves partnerships with the Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council, The Pilot Station Traditional Council, the Gwichya Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council, and with the University of Alaska at Kuskowkwin community college that serves the largely Yup’ik residents of the Yukon-Kuskowkwim Delta. . The six rivers included in the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory are the Yukon and Mackenzie in North American and the Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma in Eurasia. The rivers will be sampled near their mouths, every two months for three years, using identical sample collection and preservation protocols. Approximately 40 parameters will be measured on all samples including dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations and isotopic compositions, concentrations of dissolved nutrients, major ions, and trace elements, and optical properties of dissolved organic matter, including UV absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices. For QA/QC purposes, every analysis will be conducted at a single laboratory. The resulting data, along with complementary data on river discharge, will be made available without restriction at the Arctic-GRO website (arcticgreatrivers.org) and through the NSF Arctic Data Center. Arctic-GRO data, which build on observatory records that extend back to 2003, provide valuable end-members for the oceanographic research community as well as for analyses of terrestrial landscape change.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Holmes (1602615, LEAD, WHRC), Spencer, (1603149, FSU), McClelland (1602680, UTexas), and Shiklomanov (1602879, UNH) will continue the Arctic-GRO river sampling project (previously under NSF grant #1107774) for 2017 through 2019. The project will continue sampling the Ob’, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma rivers in Siberia, and the Yukon and Mackenzie rivers in North America. The sampling will occur six times a year on a bi-monthly basis with approximately 40 parameters being measured on each set of samples. Local and regional partners will carry out a majority of the sampling, though the U.S. researchers will take occasional trips to the field to participate in sampling. In 2017, one researcher may travel to the Northeast Science Station prior to the end of December sampling.

CPS will provide subcontracting support required to complete all of the sampling in Russia, Canada, & Alaska, user days at NorthEast Science Station (NESS), and assistance with the annual US import of water samples from the four Russian rivers. All other logistics will be organized and paid for through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Pilot Station0
2017Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2017Russia - Kolyma River1
2017Russia - Lena River0
2017Russia - Ob River0
2017Russia - Yenisey River0
2018Alaska - Pilot Station0
2018Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2018Russia - Kolyma River0
2018Russia - Lena River0
2018Russia - Ob River0
2018Russia - Yenisey River0
2019Alaska - Pilot Station0
2019Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2019Russia - Kolyma River0
2019Russia - Lena River0
2019Russia - Ob River0
2019Russia - Yenisey River0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: The Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) (Award# 1602680)

PI: McClelland, James W (jimm@utexas.edu)
Phone: 0(361) 749.6756 
Institute/Department: U of Texas, Austin, Marine Science Institute 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences\Biogeochemistry | Geological Sciences\Climate Change | Geological Sciences\Hydrology | Geological Sciences\Rivers |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.arcticgreatrivers.org
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Just like changes in blood chemistry can be used to diagnose an individual's health, so too can changes in river water chemistry be used to evaluate the condition of a river's watershed. In the Arctic, six massive rivers capture freshwater runoff from two-thirds of the land area that drains to the Arctic Ocean. The chemistry of this runoff reflects watershed characteristics (e.g. soil composition), and carries essential nutrients to the marine environment. The overarching scientific objective of the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) is to make sustained observations of the chemistry of these six large rivers, which is vital for assessing changes on land that subsequently impact physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Arctic Ocean. The project involves partnerships with the Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council, The Pilot Station Traditional Council, the Gwichya Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council, and with the University of Alaska at Kuskowkwin community college that serves the largely Yup’ik residents of the Yukon-Kuskowkwim Delta. . The six rivers included in the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory are the Yukon and Mackenzie in North American and the Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma in Eurasia. The rivers will be sampled near their mouths, every two months for three years, using identical sample collection and preservation protocols. Approximately 40 parameters will be measured on all samples including dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations and isotopic compositions, concentrations of dissolved nutrients, major ions, and trace elements, and optical properties of dissolved organic matter, including UV absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices. For QA/QC purposes, every analysis will be conducted at a single laboratory. The resulting data, along with complementary data on river discharge, will be made available without restriction at the Arctic-GRO website (arcticgreatrivers.org) and through the NSF Arctic Data Center. Arctic-GRO data, which build on observatory records that extend back to 2003, provide valuable end-members for the oceanographic research community as well as for analyses of terrestrial landscape change.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Holmes (1602615, LEAD, WHRC), Spencer, (1603149, FSU), McClelland (1602680, UTexas), and Shiklomanov (1602879, UNH) will continue the Arctic-GRO river sampling project (previously under 1107774) for 2017 through 2019. Logistic details under 1602615.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Pilot Station0
2017Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2017Russia - Kolyma River0
2017Russia - Lena River0
2017Russia - Ob River0
2017Russia - Yenisey River0
2018Alaska - Pilot Station0
2018Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2018Russia - Kolyma River0
2018Russia - Lena River0
2018Russia - Ob River0
2018Russia - Yenisey River0
2019Alaska - Pilot Station0
2019Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2019Russia - Kolyma River0
2019Russia - Lena River0
2019Russia - Ob River0
2019Russia - Yenisey River0
 


Project Title: Doctoral Dissertation Research: Reconstructing How Ecosystems Develop in High Northern Latitudes Using Genetic Markers and Temperature Signals in Lake Sediments (Award# 1657743)

PI: Miller, Gifford (gmiller@colorado.edu)
Phone: 0(303) 492.6962 
Institute/Department: U of Colorado, Boulder, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\GSS
Program Manager: Dr. Antoinette WinklerPrins (anwinkle@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://nsidc.org/acadis/
Data: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/
Data: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra
Data: https://instaar.colorado.edu/
Data: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/paleoclimato...
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
This doctoral dissertation research project will reconstruct the plant community of a lake catchment over the last 7,000 years in order to better understand how tundra ecosystems respond to changing environmental conditions. As the Arctic warms and vegetation ranges are expected to expand northward, the increase in woody vegetation at high latitudes has important implications for both global and Arctic ecosystems. By identifying how past plant community shifted and reconstructing temperatures using two new techniques that analyze lake sediments, the doctoral student will enhance understanding about the complexities of the interplay between climate and biogeography at high latitudes both in the past and in a potentially warmer future. The project will provide research education and training opportunities for undergraduate students. As a Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement award, this award also will provide support to enable a promising doctoral student to establish a strong independent research career. The doctoral student will use a combination of relatively new techniques to analyze past environments. One is the analysis of previously dated lake sediments for sedimentary ancient DNA, the complex mixture of degraded DNA found within bulk sediment, in order to identify the plants that lived within the lake catchment during the Holocene Epoch. The second technique the student will employ is a recently developed biogeochemical tool, the use of a distribution of a class of bacterial cell membrane lipids called "branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers" (brGDGTs), which can be used to estimate past temperature. Using these techniques, the student will seek answers to the following sets of research questions: 1) Following the retreat of glaciers, how long did it take for dwarf shrubs to become established in the lake catchment? 2) How did plant diversity respond to the warmth of the early Holocene and cooling during the Late Holocene? 3) When did Betula (dwarf birch), a shrub that is currently near its northern limit in our field area, become established, and did it remain present through Holocene temperature fluctuations? Through the combined use of these new techniques, the project's results will offer new perspectives about the climatic and temporal factors influencing northward plant migration in the Arctic.

Logistics Summary:
This doctoral dissertation project will conduct paleotemperature reconstructions in a lake sediment cores from Baffin Island, Canada, in order to generate a detailed record of the establishment of a tundra ecosystem following deglaciation and its evolution through Holocene climate fluctuations. In August 2017, the Co-PI will work with collaborators at the Nunavut Research Institute/Arctic College and local residents of Baffin Island. She will collect vegetation samples for DNA reference material and modern samples for determining brGDGT source. She will also establish a collaborative lake monitoring program with Arctic College in Iqaluit to provide samples that track seasonal changes in brGDGT flux. This will involve the collection of shallow soil samples, filtrates from water column samples obtained from three water depths and surface sediment using a box corer. Partners from the Arctic College will participate in this initial modern sample collection. The Co-PI will also establish air, soil, and lake temperature monitoring stations and conduct repeat measurements of pH and dissolved oxygen in order to explore the environmental factors affecting brGDGT distributions.

CPS will provide safety and communications equipment, as well as shipping support. All other logistics will be arranged and paid for by the PI from the research grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Canada - Iqaluit, Baffin Island08 / 09 / 2017 08 / 31 / 20173
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: Studies of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and Space Weather Using the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS) (Award# 1265651)

PI: Moldwin, Mark B (mmoldwin@umich.edu)
Phone: 0(734) 647.3370 
Institute/Department: U of Michigan, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Science 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\AGS
Program Manager: Dr. Therese Jorgensen (tjorgens@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Space Physics\Cusp | Space Physics\Ionospheric Physics | Space Physics\Magnetic Storms | Space Physics\Magnetospheric Physics | Space Physics\Solar-Terrestrial Relations | Space Physics\ULF Waves |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://maccs.datatransport.org
Institute: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/about.html
Data: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/index.html
Data: http://space.augsburg.edu/maccs/request.jsp
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=12...

Science Summary:
This project consists of two activities. The first will continue the operation and data distribution of observations from the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS). The second is a research program using the MACCS data along with SuperDARN radar, the Relocatable Atmospheric Observatory in Resolute Bay, nominally conjugate stations in the Antarctic and GPS TEC receivers at two of the MACCS sites. Data from the AMPERE satellites also will be used. The project identifies four topics: * Performing detailed studies of dayside high-latitude ULF waves and transient events, using multi-instrument ground-based and satellite data. * Providing observational and theoretical support for the recently-launched Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission by investigating the role of ULF waves in energizing or depleting radiation belt electrons during magnetic storms, in part using the recently developed ULF index. * Investigating the high-latitude field-aligned current structures associated with both transient events and steady convection, using magnetic field and GPS TEC data along with global data from the AMPERE project. * Using the combination of MACCS data with simultaneous data from both low-orbiting and high-orbiting satellites to separate spatial and temporal variations in magnetospheric and ionospheric processes, and carrying out theoretical and modeling studies of the excitation and propagation of ULF waves through the global magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This study will use the BATS-R-US global magnetohydrodynamic simulation code. The MACCS data are freely distributed to the entire science community.

Logistics Summary:
The collaborative project between Engebretson (1264146, Augsburg) and Moldwin (1265651, U of Michigan) consists of two activities. The first will continue the operation and data distribution of observations from the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS). The second is a research program using the MACCS data along with SuperDARN radar, the Relocatable Atmospheric Observatory in Resolute Bay, nominally conjugate stations in the Antarctic and GPS TEC receivers at two of the MACCS sites. Logistic details under 1264146.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2014Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island0
2014Canada - Nain0
2015Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island0
2015Canada - Nain0
2016Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island0
2016Canada - Nain0
2017Canada - Coral Harbour, Southampton Island0
2017Canada - Nain0
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: The Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) (Award# 1602879)

PI: Shiklomanov, Alexander (alex.shiklomanov@unh.edu)
Phone: 0(603) 862.1234 
Institute/Department: U of New Hampshire, Complex Systems Research Center 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences\Biogeochemistry | Geological Sciences\Climate Change | Geological Sciences\Hydrology | Geological Sciences\Rivers |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.arcticgreatrivers.org
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Just like changes in blood chemistry can be used to diagnose an individual's health, so too can changes in river water chemistry be used to evaluate the condition of a river's watershed. In the Arctic, six massive rivers capture freshwater runoff from two-thirds of the land area that drains to the Arctic Ocean. The chemistry of this runoff reflects watershed characteristics (e.g. soil composition), and carries essential nutrients to the marine environment. The overarching scientific objective of the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) is to make sustained observations of the chemistry of these six large rivers, which is vital for assessing changes on land that subsequently impact physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Arctic Ocean. The project involves partnerships with the Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council, The Pilot Station Traditional Council, the Gwichya Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council, and with the University of Alaska at Kuskowkwin community college that serves the largely Yup’ik residents of the Yukon-Kuskowkwim Delta. . The six rivers included in the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory are the Yukon and Mackenzie in North American and the Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma in Eurasia. The rivers will be sampled near their mouths, every two months for three years, using identical sample collection and preservation protocols. Approximately 40 parameters will be measured on all samples including dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations and isotopic compositions, concentrations of dissolved nutrients, major ions, and trace elements, and optical properties of dissolved organic matter, including UV absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices. For QA/QC purposes, every analysis will be conducted at a single laboratory. The resulting data, along with complementary data on river discharge, will be made available without restriction at the Arctic-GRO website (arcticgreatrivers.org) and through the NSF Arctic Data Center. Arctic-GRO data, which build on observatory records that extend back to 2003, provide valuable end-members for the oceanographic research community as well as for analyses of terrestrial landscape change.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Holmes (1602615, LEAD, WHRC), Spencer, (1603149, FSU), McClelland (1602680, UTexas), and Shiklomanov (1602879, UNH) will continue the Arctic-GRO river sampling project (previously under 1107774) for 2017 through 2019. Logistic details under 1602615.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Pilot Station0
2017Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2017Russia - Kolyma River0
2017Russia - Lena River0
2017Russia - Ob River0
2017Russia - Yenisey River0
2018Alaska - Pilot Station0
2018Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2018Russia - Kolyma River0
2018Russia - Lena River0
2018Russia - Ob River0
2018Russia - Yenisey River0
2019Alaska - Pilot Station0
2019Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2019Russia - Kolyma River0
2019Russia - Lena River0
2019Russia - Ob River0
2019Russia - Yenisey River0
 


Project Title: The History of Tomorrow: A research proposal (Award# 1633915)

PI: Sider, Gerald M ()
Phone: 0(718) 612.3965 
Institute/Department: City University of New York, The College of Staten Island, Department of Anthropology 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ASSP
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Social and Human Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
Why do the members of one community experiencing catastrophic economic and social loss retain an optimistic outlook for the future and others under similar circumstances experience stress and despair? This Early Action Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) award supports the development of a new theory and methodology in the social sciences for investigating and understanding communities facing increasing uncertainty about their social and economic future. Substance abuse is just one manifestation of social stress that characterizes communities where viable futures are increasingly difficult to grasp for large segments of the population. This project is rooted in the investigator's four decades of anthropological field research in communities in the north Atlantic Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and similar comparative experience in the communities of Robeson County North Carolina. Both communities have experienced economic and social stress brought about by relocations, factory closures, and natural disasters. However, the majority of members from each community have experienced and interpreted these events in very different ways. The insights gained from this project hold promise for understanding the different ways communities experience social and economic uncertainty. From these insights, the researcher hopes to gain new knowledge about the relationship between these stressors and a vision for a viable future; insights that can inform intervention methods that support community health and well-being. This award supports a comparative study of communities in severe economic and social stress, seeking to understand the very different ways that the communities themselves conceptualize the causes and consequences both of the stressors and of their very different reactions to social and economic uncertainty. This research will examine the data from two communities in the north Atlantic Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, with comparative research with two communities in Robeson County North Carolina. In both places local communities, since the mid-1990s, have experienced major declines in employment and wages, plus declining social support programs. The researcher points out that there have been locally constructed and fairly intense efforts both to help those who suffer and to mitigate the consequences of social and economic stress, yet the differences persist. The emphasis in this research begins with seeking to understand the range of responses from community to community. Using these circumstances as a starting point, the Principal Investigator will develop new theories and methods for the study of "everyday life histories" as a means for assessing locally constructed concepts of risk and uncertainty. The research builds on the concept and methods for studying "everyday histories" first developed at the Max Planck Institute for History. This research project further develops these concepts and methods by a examining of how people have lived and currently live within and against a history that stretches into what they see as an increasingly uncertain future. Toward this end the researcher will be reviewing and reinterpreting decades of his field notes on these communities, and further developing research methods which focus both on socially constructed silences in communities and obstacles to the social recognition of both "open" and "half-hidden" pleas for help. The research will contribute not only to a more nuanced and powerful theory of social stress and stressors but has the potential developing a methodology for uncovering the complex relationships between stress as a social phenomenon and the negative behavioral and physical responses to it.

Logistics Summary:
This EAGER project will research how people understand their changing circumstances in light of declining economic prosperity. In particular, they will look at how an individual’s idea of the future, in the context of crises and uncertainty, could potentially reshape people’s relations to one another. The researcher will tentatively visit six villages in 2017 and 2018. Four of the villages are in Canada (Melrose, Dunville, Happy Valley and St. John's), and two are in North Carolina, USA (Maxton and Red Springs). These villages have gone through major demographic and socio-economic changes in recent decades. This record focuses on the work in the Arctic (Canada). There will be initial trips in 2017 of about 2 weeks to each village, primarily for archival research. The researcher will follow up with visits in 2018, again visiting each village for two weeks for in depth discussion with the village residents.

All logistics will be organized by the researcher and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Canada - Dunville06 / 01 / 2017 06 / 14 / 20171
2017Canada - Happy Valley-Goose Bay06 / 01 / 2017 06 / 14 / 20171
2017Canada - Melrose06 / 15 / 2017 06 / 30 / 20171
2017Canada - St. John's06 / 01 / 2017 06 / 14 / 20171
2018Canada - Dunville06 / 01 / 2018 06 / 14 / 20181
2018Canada - Happy Valley-Goose Bay06 / 01 / 2018 06 / 14 / 20181
2018Canada - Melrose06 / 15 / 2018 06 / 30 / 20181
2018Canada - St. John's06 / 01 / 2018 06 / 14 / 20181
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: AON: The Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) (Award# 1603149)

PI: Spencer, Robert G (rgspencer@fsu.edu)
Phone: 0(530) 601.0623 
Institute/Department: Florida State University, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\AON
Program Manager: Dr. Diane McKnight (dmcknigh@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Geological Sciences\Biogeochemistry | Geological Sciences\Climate Change | Geological Sciences\Hydrology | Geological Sciences\Rivers |

Project Web Site(s):
Project: http://www.arcticgreatrivers.org
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...
Data: https://arcticdata.io/

Science Summary:
Just like changes in blood chemistry can be used to diagnose an individual's health, so too can changes in river water chemistry be used to evaluate the condition of a river's watershed. In the Arctic, six massive rivers capture freshwater runoff from two-thirds of the land area that drains to the Arctic Ocean. The chemistry of this runoff reflects watershed characteristics (e.g. soil composition), and carries essential nutrients to the marine environment. The overarching scientific objective of the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) is to make sustained observations of the chemistry of these six large rivers, which is vital for assessing changes on land that subsequently impact physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Arctic Ocean. The project involves partnerships with the Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council, The Pilot Station Traditional Council, the Gwichya Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council, and with the University of Alaska at Kuskowkwin community college that serves the largely Yup’ik residents of the Yukon-Kuskowkwim Delta. . The six rivers included in the Arctic Great Rivers Observatory are the Yukon and Mackenzie in North American and the Ob, Yenisey, Lena, and Kolyma in Eurasia. The rivers will be sampled near their mouths, every two months for three years, using identical sample collection and preservation protocols. Approximately 40 parameters will be measured on all samples including dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations and isotopic compositions, concentrations of dissolved nutrients, major ions, and trace elements, and optical properties of dissolved organic matter, including UV absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices. For QA/QC purposes, every analysis will be conducted at a single laboratory. The resulting data, along with complementary data on river discharge, will be made available without restriction at the Arctic-GRO website (arcticgreatrivers.org) and through the NSF Arctic Data Center. Arctic-GRO data, which build on observatory records that extend back to 2003, provide valuable end-members for the oceanographic research community as well as for analyses of terrestrial landscape change.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Holmes (1602615, LEAD, WHRC), Spencer, (1603149, FSU), McClelland (1602680, UTexas), and Shiklomanov (1602879, UNH) will continue the Arctic-GRO river sampling project (previously under 1107774) for 2017 through 2019. Logistic details under 1602615.

SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2017Alaska - Pilot Station0
2017Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2017Russia - Kolyma River0
2017Russia - Lena River0
2017Russia - Ob River0
2017Russia - Yenisey River0
2018Alaska - Pilot Station0
2018Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2018Russia - Kolyma River0
2018Russia - Lena River0
2018Russia - Ob River0
2018Russia - Yenisey River0
2019Alaska - Pilot Station0
2019Canada - Mackenzie Delta0
2019Russia - Kolyma River0
2019Russia - Lena River0
2019Russia - Ob River0
2019Russia - Yenisey River0
 


Project Title: Arctic Observing and Science for Sustainability (Award# 1536175)

PI: Tung, Ka-Kit (ktung@uw.edu)
Phone: 0(206) 685.3794 
Institute/Department: U of Washington, Applied Mathematics 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\ICER
Program Manager: Ms. Maria Uhle (muhle@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://ladsweb.nascom.nasa.gov
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=15...
Data: http://www.nsof.class.noaa.gov/saa/products/welcom...

Science Summary:
This award provides support to U.S. researchers participating in a project competitively selected by a 14-country initiative on global change research through the Belmont Forum. The Belmont Forum is a high level group of the world's major and emerging funders of global environmental change research and international science councils. It aims to accelerate delivery of the international environmental research most urgently needed to remove critical barriers to sustainability by aligning and mobilizing international resources. Each partner country provides funding for their researchers within a consortium to alleviate the need for funds to cross international borders. This approach facilitates effective leveraging of national resources to support excellent research on topics of global relevance best tackled through a multinational approach, recognizing that global challenges need global solutions. Working together in this Collaborative Research Action, the partner agencies have provided support for research projects that utilize existing Arctic observing systems, datasets and models to evaluate key sustainability challenges and opportunities in the Arctic region, to innovate new sustainability science theory and approaches to these challenges and opportunities, and support decision-making towards a sustainable Arctic environment. This award provides support for the U.S. researchers to cooperate in consortia that consist of partners from at least three of the participating countries and that bring together natural scientists, social scientists and end users (e.g., policy makers, regulators, NGOs, communities and industry). The Arctic Fog Variability collaborative research effort will study the spatiotemporal variability of fog in light of recent sea ice variability and in the context of increasing interest in alternative commercial shipping routes that would transit the Arctic. This partnership between Chinese, US, Canadian, and Italian investigators will utilize available in situ and satellite environmental information and navigational and economic data as well as conduct shore-based and ship-based sampling of fog variables during the peak of fog occurrence in mid-summer. A series of modeling experiments will be conducted to determine future radiative and meteorological conditions that would induce fog and determine the potential routes of vessels through the Arctic given certain Representative Concentration Pathway scenarios. Finally, the envelope of economic impact will be determined based on a suite of variables using real-life case studies for container vessels traveling between Europe and Asia. This project unites observationalists, modelers, and end-users, including shipping companies, towards a better understanding of changing operational conditions for more informed activity in Arctic waters.

Logistics Summary:
This international Belmont Forum project is a collaborative between the United States, China, Italy, and Canada. This collaboration will study the relationship between fog and solar irradiance, including fog-sea ice feedback, leading to the development of better simulation/modelling capacity for future fog patterns in these regions. This will be accomplished in three parts: 1) Improving the fog dataset of the Arctic integrating in-situ records, 2) developing fog detection algorithms from satellite-based images, and 3) conducting field campaigns at fixed sites and aboard ships. Field work at fixed sites will occur at 2 or 3 places for continuous observation. Potential candidates include Barrow, Alaska; Tuktouaktuk, Canada; and the Svalbard Islands. Marine observation of fog will be conducted from the MV Xuelong in the Chukchi Sea every two years, as well as from international collaborative cruises with vessels from Norway, South Korea, Canada and the United States from 2016-2019.

All logistics will be organized by the researchers and paid through the grants.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)05 / 01 / 2016 05 / 21 / 20163
2016Canada - Tuktoyaktuk06 / 01 / 2016 06 / 21 / 20163
2016Norway - Svalbard08 / 01 / 2016 08 / 21 / 20163
2017Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Canada Basin1
2017Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea1
2017Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2017Norway - Svalbard1
2018Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2018Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2018Norway - Svalbard1
2019Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)1
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - Canada Basin1
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - Chukchi Sea1
2019Canada - Tuktoyaktuk1
2019Norway - Svalbard1
 


Project Title: Collaborative Research: The Initial Peopling and Settlement of Eastern Newfoundland (Award# 1640962)

PI: Wolff, Christopher B (cwolff@albany.edu)
Phone: 0(518) 442.3982 
Institute/Department: State University of New York at Albany,  
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Anna Kerttula (akerttul@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Social and Human Sciences |

Project Web Site(s):
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=16...

Science Summary:
This project is an archaeological examination of the cultural and ecological factors that contributed to the colonization and settlement of Newfoundland by Maritime Archaic peoples. The Maritime Archaic peoples (ca. 6,000 B.C.-1,000 B.C.) were the first to colonize the Eastern Subarctic and Arctic of North America. They created a way of life that allowed them to successfully occupy the entire coast and near interior of Newfoundland and Labrador for thousands of years, and maintain relationships with contemporaneous cultures that stretched throughout much of northeastern North America. However, we still know very little about their initial settlement of the region, their early social organization, and the ways these processes were affected by ecological factors. The aim of this research is to examine the initial settlement of Newfoundland within the larger context of the peopling of northeastern North America and the roles that historical processes, both cultural and environmental, played in that broader framework. This will include new archaeological excavations at early Maritime Archaic sites in Newfoundland, as well as investigation and analysis of existing Maritime Archaic artifact collections from throughout the region. It will also examine ecological data, such as plant and animal remains, to assess the wider role of environmental change in the initial occupation of the eastern Subarctic and how early cultural adaptations developed within northern coastal and island ecosystems. This project is an international collaboration of professional archaeologists, graduate students, and undergraduates. The training and education of undergraduate students is a critical component of this project. Moreover, project members will continue to collaborate with local communities to develop economic and preservation initiatives related to the archaeological sites and cultural heritage associated with this research and to create educational opportunities for students and community members in the region. This research will have extensive implications for our understanding of how and when people first settled the easternmost region of North America, and northern coasts and islands more generally. The earliest human migration onto any landscape is a complex, interactive, and dynamic historical process. In North America, the colonization process is often generalized within an evolutionary perspective that envisions humans simply reacting to ecological opportunities offered by newly available landscapes and resources at the end of the last Ice Age. It is also often framed as solely a Paleoindian process that did not extend far into the Holocene, despite the fact that large portions of northern North America were not colonized until the Middle Holocene. New archaeological fieldwork and collections analysis concerning the Archaic expansion onto and around the island of Newfoundland will inform larger models of human colonization within the region, as well as in other Arctic and Subarctic coastal zones. This includes the initial peopling of North America on the other side of the continent and the role that northern coasts and islands played in that process. It will also help us better understand the interaction between Archaic people and their environment and the adaptation strategies they employed in unknown coastal and island landscapes, as well as the relative impact they had on those environments. To address these issues the research team will survey and date extant collections to fine-tune the chronological resolution of the initial colonization processes of Newfoundland. They will also conduct new excavations at the Stock Cove and Stock Cove West sites in eastern Newfoundland where Maritime Archaic deposits have been found that appear to stratigraphically correlate to their earliest occupations of the region and that have the first evidence of architecture by Archaic peoples on the island. This will be assessed with a suite of new dates and analyses of material remains recovered from those excavations. Additionally, new geophysical surveys employing ground penetrating radar and magnetometry will be conducted to locate new Archaic deposits to help focus the excavations and noninvasively assess other archaeological deposits that could address the earliest settlement of Newfoundland. Finally, ecological data (e.g. insects, faunal remains, macrobotanicals) will be collected and analyzed to help reconstruct environmental patterns that may have impacted and influenced the peopling and settlement process by the Maritime Archaic. This project will have broader impacts that include: 1) the first excavation and analysis of a Maritime Archaic structure on the island of Newfoundland; 2) the contribution of important data to our understanding of Archaic social organization and settlement in the eastern Subarctic/Arctic; 3) obtaining key environmental data that will assist with the assessment of environmental change throughout the Holocene and may inform the development of modern policies regarding the mitigation of environmental change and economic impacts (e.g., sea mammal hunting, fishing quotas, wildlife conservation, sea ice extent, coastal erosion); 4) the training of undergraduate students in archaeological field and laboratory methods; 5) international dissemination of our results to both academic and public audiences, and; 6) increased interaction with local communities, regional museums, and other interested parties within Newfoundland and Labrador concerning their heritage and cultural resources, including public lectures and the development of educational tools (e.g., social media, historical markers, pamphlets, booklets) for those communities.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Wolff (1640962, Lead, SUNY at Albany) and Holly (1522977, Eastern Illinois University) is an international and multi-institutional project that will examine the cultural and ecological factors that contributed to the colonization and settlement of eastern Newfoundland by Maritime Archaic peoples during the Middle Holocene. With field work in 2016 and 2017, of this three-year project, a field team of five will travel to Stock Cove and Stock Cove West in southeastern Newfoundland, Canada. A boat will be charted to take the researchers from the nearby town of Sunnyside to the Stock Cove field site. The plan is for two, one-month field seasons over two consecutive summers. Initial survey work will include Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EM) groundwork. Using the geophysical survey results, researchers will excavate two 2 x 5 meter (m) perpendicular trenches at the Stock Cove site. At Stock Cove West, they will excavate one 2 x 5 m trench. All soil will be screened in the field using ¼” mesh, and multiple bulk samples (~5 liter from each stratum) will be shipped to the researcher’s home institution analysis for further analysis. All formal artifacts, debitage, and organic remains from each site will be collected, analyzed, and catalogued in the Archeology Curation Lab at SUNY-Plattsburgh. In 2016 the PI, Wolff, transferred from SUNY College at Plattsburgh to SUNY at Albany (previous NSF grant # 1522202).

All logistics will be organized by the researcher(s) and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2016Canada - Stock Cove Field Site07 / 01 / 2016 07 / 15 / 20165
2016Canada - Stock Cove West Field Site07 / 16 / 2016 07 / 31 / 20165
2017Canada - Stock Cove Field Site07 / 01 / 2017 07 / 15 / 20175
2017Canada - Stock Cove West Field Site07 / 16 / 2017 07 / 31 / 20175
 


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Parameters used to generate this report:Region = "Canada", Season = "2017", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 14
 
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