Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Continuous Records of Greenhouse Gases and Aerosol Deposition During the Holocene: Testing the Fidelity of New Methods for Reconstructing Atmospheric Change (Award# 1204176)

PI: McConnell, Joseph R ( joe.mcconnell@dri.edu)
Phone: (775) 673.7348 
Institute/Department: Desert Research Institute, Division of Hydrologic Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ANS
Program Manager: Dr. William Ambrose (wambrose@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Meteorology and Climate |

Project Web Site(s):
Data: http://nsidc.org/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The primary goals of the project are to exploit new measurement techniques to evaluate the fidelity of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide gas measurements in ice cores as records of atmospheric concentrations and change and to develop a first, high-resolution Northern Hemisphere record of atmospheric methane and carbon monoxide during the past 1400 years free of site- or ice-core-specific artifacts. To understand the influences of burial rate and history, ice impurities, as well as drilling and analytical techniques on ice core gas concentrations, the proposed project will further refine and improve new methods for continuous gas measurements and use these improved methods to analyze gases and aerosols in ice core samples from three widely distributed sites in northern Greenland: Tunu, D4, and NGRIP. All are located in the cold, dry snow zone, but each has a different annual accumulation rate and is influenced by different aerosol sources and transport pathways. Two sites previously were used for firn gas studies which will provide needed controls for firn and gas-entrapment modeling. Archived core samples are available for D4 and NGRIP, but a new core from the Tunu site is required. The measurements will utilize the Desert Research Institute's (DRI's) continuous-flow analysis with trace elements system capable of quantifying dust, sea salt, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols. This system was recently expanded to include continuous gas measurements being developed and refined by Oregon State University (OSU), DRI, and other international collaborators under an NSF Partnerships in International Research and Education (PIRE) grant primarily focused on student participation and international collaborations rather than research. The project will extend past K-12 and other outreach strategies, including coordination and development of activities with outreach specialists at the Ice Drilling Program Office. Broad outreach will be achieved with the global, radiative, and ice sheet modeling communities, NSTA-related efforts, and public lectures.

Logistics Summary:
The primary goals of this collaboration between McConnell (1204176, DRI, lead) and Brook (1204172, OSU) are to exploit new measurement techniques to evaluate the fidelity of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide gas measurements in ice cores as records of atmospheric concentrations and change – and to develop a first, high-resolution Northern Hemisphere record of atmospheric methane and carbon monoxide during the past 1400 years free of site- or ice-core-specific artifacts. To understand the influences of burial rate and history, ice impurities, as well as drilling and analytical techniques on ice core gas concentrations, the project will further refine and improve new methods for continuous gas measurements and use these improved methods to analyze gases and aerosols in ice core samples from three widely distributed Greenland sites: Tunu, D4, and NGRIP in northern Greenland. In late spring 2013, a field team of 5 will travel via ANG to Kangerlussuaq. After preparing field gear and equipment, they will travel to a field site near the Tunu-N AWS site via chartered Basler (BT-67) aircraft. Using Summit Station as a base, the Basler will shuttle the project team and cargo to the field site. After establishing the camp, the team will use dry drilling techniques to extract ~200 meters of ice core, which they will stabilize and package for later transport. The team will finish and depart the field via Basler-supported shuttle flights between Kangerlussuaq and the field site. When all cargo (including samples) is in Kangerlussuaq, the Basler will then return to its base in Canada. The team will return to the United States via the Air National Guard logistics chain, which will also support retrograde of frozen ice core samples later in the season.

CPS support includes Air National Guard (ANG) coordination for passengers and cargo between NY and Kangerlussuaq, KISS user days, some consumable core materials, freezer space as needed in Kangerlussuaq, freight for cores from NY back to PI's institution, fixed wing charters, and camp, communication and safety gear. IDDO will provide a driller and drill to extract the 200-meter core. All other logistics will be arranged by the researchers and paid through the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2013Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 04 / 2013 06 / 08 / 20135
2013Greenland - Tunu N AWS05 / 07 / 2013 06 / 06 / 20135
 


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Parameters used to generate this report:, Grant# = "1204176", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 1
 
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