Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Collaborative Research: Thermodynamic and Dynamic Drivers of the Arctic Sea Ice Mass Budget at MOSAiC (Award# 1724551)

PI: Shupe, Matthew D (matthew.shupe@noaa.gov)
Phone: (303) 497.6471 
Institute/Department: U of Colorado, Boulder, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences 
IPY Project?
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ARC\ARCSS
Program Manager: Dr. Gregory Anderson (greander@nsf.gov )
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Instrument Development | Meteorology and Climate | Oceanography |

Project Web Site(s):
Initiative: http://www.mosaic-expedition.org/
Data: https://arcticdata.io/
NSF_Award_Info: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1...

Science Summary:
Energy fluxes to the sea ice, and the processes that control them in time and space, comprise some of the largest uncertainties in current models of the central Arctic system and are likely changing as the sea ice thins. This project will make observations to provide the type of information that model developers need for representing emergent Arctic processes. These observations will be the first set of comprehensive, coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean energy and momentum flux measurements collected within a well-defined network. They will enable a process-based understanding of ice thermodynamics and dynamics via synergistic use of a coupled model. The Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) expedition is a tremendous opportunity to leverage large US and international investments. MOSAiC is motivated by the changing Arctic system and declining sea ice, and their significant implications for the global climate system and numerous stakeholders. The initiative seeks to address leading deficiencies in model representation of coupled, atmosphere-ice-ocean processes in the Arctic system through intensive, year-round observations from a drifting station in the central Arctic and coordinated multi-scale modeling. This project will examine the detailed interplay of sea-ice thermodynamic and dynamic processes and how they control the state of the ice over a full year. This project will entail an observational array of five nodes installed at approximately 15 km separation in the central Arctic sea ice, each of which has systems to measure continuously the states of the upper ocean and lower atmosphere, the heat and momentum fluxes from the ocean and atmosphere to the ice, and the ice thermodynamic state and mass balance. A network of position buoys will be used to measure ice movement and deformation across the observing domain. Regional, coupled-system model simulations will provide the means to synthesize observational information towards process understanding. Together these tools will be used to build comprehensive sea ice energy, upper ocean heat, and sea-ice momentum budgets, examine how these co-vary in space and time over all seasons, and develop temporally evolving process relationships among multiple key parameters. They will use the detailed observations and coupled regional model to examine how energy transfer processes (thermodynamics) are influenced by sea-ice deformation (dynamics) on sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales, and they will assess sea-ice predictability related to dynamic and thermodynamic process relationships, using a full year of quasi-operational, 10-day sea-ice forecasts. Improved predictive models are an important means for addressing major societal needs related to Arctic change and declining sea ice. The project will provide an observational and process-based foundation for model development that has been called for by model developers and international experts. Moreover, it will offer insight into the sources of sea ice predictability, which will help to constrain future research pathways for improved sea ice models. The observations will enable a wide array of coupled system research that reaches well beyond the proposed project to impact research on other aspects of the Arctic physical, biological, and biogeochemical systems. Moreover, this project will support development towards autonomous ocean and atmospheric flux measurements that will help fill critical gaps in the Arctic observing network. Educational content developed around the project's research themes will support student learning on the physics of the Arctic system and enable broader scientific outreach efforts.

Logistics Summary:
This collaboration between Shupe (1724551, LEAD, CU), Stanton (1723400, Moss Landing), Hutchings (1722729, OSU) and Perovich (1724424, Dartmouth) will examine in detail the interplay of sea ice thermodynamic and dynamic processes and how they control the state of the ice over a full year. In coordination with numerous other measurements that comprise MOSAiC, this project will entail an observational array of four nodes installed at ~15km scales in the central Arctic sea ice, each of which has systems to continuously measure the states of the upper ocean and lower atmosphere, the heat and momentum fluxes from the ocean and atmosphere to the ice, and the ice thermodynamic state and mass balance. A network of position buoys will also be used to measure ice movement and deformation across the observing domain. The RV Polarstern will depart from Tromso, Norway and, once it reaches its destination, will spend the next year drifting through the Arctic Ocean, trapped in the ice. During the set-up phase, the RV Polarstern will enter the Siberian sector of the Arctic in thin sea ice conditions in late summer. A distributed regional network of observational sites will be set up on the sea ice in an area of up to ~50km from the RV Polarstern. The ship and the surrounding network will drift with the natural ice across the polar cap towards the Atlantic, while the sea ice thickens during winter. The research teams will join the expedition for several months at a time (aka legs) as the expedition will change crews and be supplied by other icebreakers and aircraft throughout the year. There will be six legs of the expedition and a total of 23 NSF awards in support of the MOSAiC effort. During Leg 1, there will be two ships involved and some of the participants will travel to/from the R/V Polarstern via the escort vessel Akademik Federov (Leg 1a). For more information on the MOSAiC expedition, go to www.mosaic-expedition.org. As preparation for this project’s participation in the larger MOSAiC project, a team of three researchers will participate in a MOSAiC-specific field training in Utqiagvik in April of 2019 along with other required MOSAiC training required for the expedition. Starting in September of 2019, the researchers will join the expedition participating in Legs 1-6. During Leg 1, five of the participants will travel on the MOSAiC escort vessel Akademik Federov (Leg 1a).

CPS will provide safety training and travel support for meetings and trainings. All other logistics support will be provided by Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) via the user day fee and/or covered by the PI direct to grant. The AWI user day fee will be covered via an agreement between the NSF and AWI.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2019Alaska - Utqiaġvik (Barrow)04 / 07 / 2019 04 / 13 / 20193
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 1, 1a09 / 20 / 2019 12 / 15 / 20197
2019Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 212 / 16 / 2019 12 / 31 / 20192
2020Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 201 / 01 / 2020 02 / 15 / 20202
2020Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 302 / 16 / 2020 04 / 09 / 20202
2020Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 404 / 16 / 2020 06 / 15 / 20202
2020Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 504 / 16 / 2020 06 / 15 / 20202
2020Arctic Ocean and Seas - MOSAiC Leg 608 / 16 / 2020 09 / 30 / 20202
 


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