Arctic Field Projects



Project Title: Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) (Award# 0424589)

PI: Gogineni, Sivaprasad (gogineni@cresis.ku.edu)
Phone: (785) 864-734  
Institute/Department: U of Kansas, CReSIS 
IPY Project? YES
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ANT\AG
Program Manager: Dr. Henrietta Edmonds (hedmonds@nsf.gov )


Project Web Site(s):

Science Summary:


Logistics Summary:


CPS will provide ANG coordination for people and cargo as fits the field schedule, KISS user days, warehouse staging space, truck and trailer rentals, fuel, camping/communication/safety equipment, assistance with site familiarization/ set-up, and deployment of an on-site project manager to assist as required. All other logistics will be arranged by the PI and paid for from the grant.



Project Title: Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) (Award# 0424589)

PI: Gogineni, Sivaprasad (gogineni@cresis.ku.edu)
Phone: (785) 864-734  
Institute/Department: U of Kansas, CReSIS 
IPY Project? YES
Funding Agency: US\Federal\NSF\GEO\OPP\ANT\AG
Program Manager: Dr. Julie Palais (jpalais@nsf.gov)
Discipline(s): | Cryosphere | Education and Outreach | Legacy Projects |

Project Web Site(s):
Institute: http://www.cresis.ku.edu/
NSF_Award_Info: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardN...

Science Summary:
The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), a Science and Technology Center led by the University of Kansas, will conduct and foster multi-disciplinary research that will result in technology and models necessary to achieve a better understanding of the mass balance of the polar ice sheets (e.g., Greenland and Antarctica) and their contributions to sea level rise. CReSIS will also work to inspire and educate the next generation of scientists and engineers and benefits society by increasing diversity in science and engineering and by transferring knowledge to industry, the public, policy makers and the scientific community. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has identified ice sheet mass balance as one of the largest unknown factors in sea-level change, and the range of possible mass balance scenarios developed by IPCC does not account for the rapid changes to ice sheets that have been observed by glaciologists. The problems associated with determining ice sheet mass balance and creating predictive models of ice sheet dynamics are scientifically and technologically complex, and the best way of solving these problems is through a Science and Technology Center focusing the efforts of a sizeable group of scientists and engineers for a significant period of time on this topic of global scale and high societal relevance. Because of the immense size and complexity of these ice sheets, data from satellite and airborne platforms, combined with ground-based, in-situ measurements and observations, are needed to accurately assess their mass balance state. Technological innovations are needed and will be made in three areas, including sensors, platforms, and cyberinfrastructure. New analytical models and algorithms must be developed to interpret the data and improve understanding of glacial dynamics. Scientists and engineers will work closely in the areas of technological innovation, data collection, and data analysis. Five partner institutions and two NASA centers will play critical roles in the new S&T Center. The Byrd Polar Research Center (BPRC) will contribute to development of in-situ observation techniques for characterizing snow, field activities, satellite observations, and modeling. Pennsylvania State University (PSU) will participate in technology development for seismic measurements, field activities, and modeling. The University of Maine (UM) will lead the development and application of numerical ice-sheet models of varying complexity. Major research universities will all be involved in developing and teaching new interdisciplinary courses to support the Center's education mission. The Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education and Research (CERSER) at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU, Elizabeth City, NC) will contribute its expertise in analyzing satellite data and generating high-level data products. Haskell Indian Nations University (Haskell, Lawrence, KS) will participate in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to perform spatial analyses and data product generation. Both ECSU and Haskell will bring to the Center their extensive experience in mentoring and educating underrepresented students. All partner institutions will be involved in the analysis and interpretation of observational and numerical data sets. CReSIS developed an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) integrated with a dual low-frequency radar sounder to measure ice thickness of fast flowing glaciers. The integrated system was successfully field-tested in Antarctica during the 2013-2014 field seasons. One of the main reasons for developing the radar-equipped UAS is to collect data over closely spaced lines, as close as 5 m, in the cross-track direction to synthesize a 2-D aperture to reduce surface clutter that masks weak bed echoes from the ice-bed interface. The surface of fast-flowing glaciers is very rough and off-vertical signals scattered by the rough ice-surface, referred to as surface clutter, can often mask weak bed echoes. We need a large 2-D aperture to reduce surface clutter both in the along-track and cross-track directions. The primary goals of the field program are to collect data over a rough-surface glacier to demonstrate the scientific utility of radar-equipped UAS for sounding the most challenging glaciers in Greenland, and to test the ultra-wideband radar with large antenna-array of 24 elements being developed as a part of NSF MRI project for operation BT-67 and to demonstrate its scientific utility in sounding and imaging polar ice.

Logistics Summary:
The goal of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional effort is to characterize the base of Greenland’s ice sheet and the englacial environment in two areas: the region where the supraglacial lakes form and drain to the bed through moulins and the region where Jakobshavn Glacier tributaries come together to form the main ice stream channel. As lead institution, the University of Kansas (KU) will provide overall direction and management. The Ohio State University (Co-PI Kenneth Jezek, institutional lead), Pennsylvania State University (Co-PI Richard Alley, institutional lead), University of Maine (Terence Hughes, institutional lead), Elizabeth City State University (Linda Hayden, institutional lead) and Haskell Indian Nations University (Carol Bowen, institutional lead) are key research partners as well. The research, which is planned for 2007 and onward, involves four basic efforts: airborne and surface-based radar surveys at various scales, seismic surveys, 150-meter ice core samples, and GPS deployments. The researchers plan to work from Ilulissat (for the aerial work) and at two field sites, one near Swiss Camp and another at a glacier tributary near Crawford Point (for the ground-based research). Field work during 2007 will have two foci. For the first, a team of five led by Sridhar Anandakrishnan (Penn State) will conduct ground-based reconnaissance work in May to prepare for a full experiment in 2009, a seismic effort to image the base of the Jakobshavn Glacier. After put in via Twin Otter to a field site on the upper part of the glacier, the team will establish a camp, and, working from that base, spend 3 – 4 weeks conducting a skidoo-based traverse to make measurements using radar, GPS, and explosives. They will return to Kangerlussuaq via Twin Otter at the end of the field effort. The other 2007 effort, led by Ellen Mosley-Thompson (Ohio State), will place researchers in Greenland’s Jakobshavn Drainage Basin in May. There, a team of five will camp for about three weeks near Crawford Point where several 10-meter cores will be collected in conjunction with speedograph profiles for calibration. Detailed pit studies are also planned. Put-in and take-out will be supported via Twin Otter aircraft. During 2008 the CReSIS team will work on two projects: an airborne radar survey aboard an instrumented Twin Otter; and a land-based survey. For the airborne work, a team of 9-10 (6 CReSIS and 3-4 NASA members) will base from Ilulissat to conduct an airborne survey of the Jakobshavn Glacier via Twin Otter. After arriving in Kangerlussuaq via the ANG logistics chain, the team will travel via commercial air to Ilulissat to begin survey work in mid June. They will complete efforts in late July. For the surface work, in late July, three researchers will conduct a surface-based radar survey, using the NEEM deep drilling infrastructure as a base for approximately 3 weeks. In addition, CReSIS researchers in Ilulissat will collaborate with engineers developing information networking infrastructure at both poles called POLARGRID (072305, Geoffrey Fox, Indiana State). Lead PI Gogineni will helm this effort. CReSIS fields two projects again in 2009: Twin Otter-based airborne radar surveys of the Jakobshavn region based from Ilulissat and of the Helheim and Kangerdlussuaq regions based from Kulusuk; and a seismic experiment. A team of six will begin the airborne survey work in late March. Basing from Ilulissat, they will conduct nearly two weeks of survey work before four researchers reposition to Kulusuk in western Greenland and continue the airborne surveys, and two depart Greenland. Survey work in the vicintiy of Helheim and Kangerdlussuaq Glaciers will continue for more than two weeks. The team will then move the CReSIS base to Kangerlussuaq, spending about five days there removing the instruments from the Twin Otter before flying off the island. The seismic work will require two deployments of ~10 days each, one in mid-May and the other in late July / early August. For the May trip, three researchers will select a site about 80 miles from Ilulissat, at approximately 68.72°N, -49.50°W. There, they will place instruments to record seismic activity associated with a draining lake. Four seismic systems will be installed in a cross pattern with legs approximately 5 km long. The team will need about two days to install all the systems, making day trips from Kangerlussuaq. In late July, the three will return to Greenland to remove these systems. For this work, the team will base from Ilulissat and revisit the sites via helicopter day trips from there. 2010 efforts involve two Greenlandic deployments supporting seismic work. The team will base out of Ilulissat for 10 days in May and again for about 1 week in August. For the May trip, three researchers will install ~20 small GPS receivers. The first site will be sited on rock; the remaining will be on the ice. These installations will form a line from the rock to the supraglacial lakes, and then will ring around the lakes. The team will have three days of close support: the helicopter will remain with them while they spend about 30 minutes installing each instrument before moving to the next site. They also will spend about three days working in the field on day trips from Ilulissat; the helicopter will drop them off in the morning and pick them up in the late afternoon. The day trips will allow the team to perform an active seismic experiment to examine the nature of the base of the glacier in the area around the lake. The team will return in August to remove all the GPS receivers. These will be returned to New York via Kangerlussuaq. In 2011, there will be a spring and summer deployment. The team will return to Greenland in March to collect airborne remote sensing observations required to understand and model rapidly changing outlet glaciers in southern Greenland. Four researchers will conduct Twin Otter-based airborne radar surveys based from the Ilulissat, Kulusuk, and Nuuk regions for local-scale radar sounding, internal layer mapping, and imaging of the southern outlet glaciers. This work precedes the ANG Greenland flying season, so three members of the team will fly commercially to Greenland while one flies with the Twin Otter from Calgary, Canada, to Ilulissat in northeastern Greenland. Survey work will be conducted in the Ilulissat region for approximately one week. From Ilulissat, the team researchers will reposition to Kulusuk in western Greenland and continue the airborne surveys for approximately two weeks. The team will then reposition to Nuuk and conduct airborne surveys in the region for approximately one week, before moving with the Twin Otter to Kangerlussuaq. They will spend about five days there removing the instruments from the Twin Otter before flying off the island via commercial aircraft that be arranged by the PI/project and paid from the grant. All arragnements for the Twin Otter will be made by AMD. CReSIS researchers will return to Greenland for a second campaign involving an unattended aerial vehicle in the summer of 2011. For the second phase, CReSIS researchers will return to Greenland in mid July for a ~four week field effort. CReSIS will send eight researchers and two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)—the Meridian UAV (including ground station and MCoRDS (Multi-channel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder) ice-penetrating radar system) and the smaller-scale Yak-54 UAV—plus various related tools, test equipment, and supplies, to the NEEM research station in Greenland via the 109th Air National Guard (ANG). Eight researchers and the mission cargo will travel on the ANG 109th from Scotia, NY to Kangerlussuaq and from Kangerlussuaq to NEEM. The UAVs will be used to conduct aerial flight tests and surveys of ice sheets at and around NEEM mid July to mid August. The 8 researchers and mission cargo will then return on the ANG 109th from NEEM to Kangerlussuaq and from Kangerluss

CPS will provide ANG coordination for people and cargo as fits the field schedule, KISS user days, warehouse staging space, truck and trailer rentals, fuel, camping/communication/safety equipment, assistance with site familiarization/ set-up, and deployment of an on-site project manager to assist as required. All other logistics will be arranged by the PI and paid for from the grant.
SeasonField SiteDate InDate Out#People
2007Greenland - Crawford Point05 / 11 / 2007 05 / 24 / 20075
2007Greenland - Jakobshavn Glacier05 / 09 / 2007 06 / 07 / 200711
2007Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 03 / 2007 06 / 12 / 200711
2007Greenland - Swiss Camp05 / 09 / 2007 06 / 06 / 20075
2008Greenland - Ilulissat06 / 24 / 2008 08 / 24 / 20085
2008Greenland - Jakobshavn Glacier06 / 24 / 2008 08 / 24 / 20085
2008Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 23 / 2008 08 / 24 / 20088
2008Greenland - NEEM07 / 27 / 2008 08 / 24 / 20084
2009Greenland - Ilulissat03 / 24 / 2009 08 / 02 / 200910
2009Greenland - Kangerlussuaq03 / 24 / 2009 08 / 06 / 200912
2009Greenland - Kulusuk04 / 07 / 2009 04 / 28 / 20094
2009Greenland - NEEM06 / 05 / 20091
2010Greenland - Ilulissat05 / 11 / 2010 08 / 21 / 20103
2010Greenland - Kangerlussuaq05 / 10 / 2010 08 / 22 / 20103
2011Greenland - Ilulissat03 / 18 / 2011 04 / 01 / 20115
2011Greenland - Kangerlussuaq03 / 29 / 2011 08 / 12 / 201112
2011Greenland - Kulusuk04 / 01 / 2011 04 / 23 / 20114
2011Greenland - NEEM07 / 17 / 2011 08 / 12 / 20117
2011Greenland - Nuuk04 / 23 / 2011 05 / 02 / 20114
2012Greenland - Kangerlussuaq06 / 04 / 2012 07 / 12 / 20125
2012Greenland - NEEM06 / 07 / 2012 07 / 11 / 20125
2012Greenland - NEGIS06 / 14 / 2012 07 / 10 / 20124
2016Greenland - Kangerlussuaq03 / 08 / 2016 04 / 25 / 20166
 


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Parameters used to generate this report:, Grant# = "0424589", IPY = "ALL" 
     Number of projects returned based on your query parameters = 2
 
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